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Social Class-Wuthering Heights

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Devyn Arnold

on 21 December 2014

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Transcript of Social Class-Wuthering Heights

Work Experience
Status Update
like comment share
"I've no more business to marry Edgar Linton than I have to be in heaven; and if the wicked man in there had not brought Heathcliff so low, I shouldn't have thought of it. It would degrade me to marry Heathcliff now." Chapter 9, p. 70
None
About
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I am the daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Earnshaw. My adopted brother, Heathcliff, and I have become close companions. We escaped Wuthering Heights and together we traveled to Thrushcross Grange to spy on a frustrated couple, the Lintons. We were caught, and I was greatly injured by the couple's dog, so I stayed at the Grange for five weeks recovering. I have learned to be more lady-like in this time while living with Isabella and Edgar Linton. I was so happy when Heathcliff returned to Wuthering Heights and I greatly enjoyed eating dinner with him. I later married Edgar and bore him a daughter, Catherine Linton.
Education
Lives In
Wuthering Heights
Catherine Earnshaw
Work Experience
Status Update
like comment share
Nelly
- "I was almost always at Wuthering Heights; because my mother had nursed Mr. Hindley Earnshaw … and I got used to playing with the children: I ran errands too, and helped to make hay, and hung about the farm ready for anything that anybody would set me to." Chapter 4, p. 29
Joseph
- "T' maister nobbut just buried, and Sabbath not o'ered, und t' sound o' t' gospel still i' yer lugs, and ye darr be laiking! Shame on ye! sit ye down, ill childer! there's good books eneugh if ye'll read 'em: sit ye down, and think o' yer sowls!" Chapter 3, p. 17
Nelly- Housekeeper, works to keep Thrushcross Grange in a stable condition
Joseph- Servant at Wuthering Heights
About
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Nelly
- I am a housekeeper for Thrushcross Grange and Wuthering Heights. I have become a great companion to both the Earnshaw and Linton families, and am very knowledgeable on the happenings between both houses. When Mr. Lockwood reaches Thrushcross Grange, I inform him on the history of the families.
Joseph
- I am a servant to the Earnshaw family at Wuthering Heights. I am strict in my faith.

Education
Nelly- Educated
Jospeh- None (Lower Class)
Lives In
Nelly- Thrushcross Grange/Wuthering Heights
Joseph- Wuthering Heights

Work Experience
Status Update
"They were too much absorbed in their own mutual joy to suffer ebarrassment. Not so Mr. Edgar: he grew pale with pure annoyance: a feeling that reached its climax when his lady rose, and stepping across the rug, seized Heathcliff's hands again, and laughed like one beside herself." Chapter 10, p. 84
None (Gentry)
About
I was born at Thrushcross Grange to Mr. and Mrs. Linton. I grew up with my sister Isabella and became the ideal man. I am handsome and possess gentlemanly characteristics and civilized virtues. In 1783, I married Catherine Earnshaw and bore a daughter, Catherine Linton, the following year. During my marriage and after my wife's death, I grew resentment towards Heathcliff for constantly attempting to gain the afftection of my Cathy. I knew as well that my Cathy had more affection for Heathcliff than myself.
Education
Well educated
Lives In
Thrushcross Grange
Edgar Linton
Work Experience
Status Update
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"I've found out, Hareton, that I want-that I'm glad-that I should like you to be my cousin, now, if you had not grown so cross to me, and so rough." Chapter 32, p. 271
None (Gentry)
About
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I am the daughter of Catherine Earnshaw and Edgar Linton. My mother died giving birth to me. I grew up at Thrushcross Grange with my father and Nelly. I married Linton Heathcliff when I was seventeen. Unfortunately, he passed away soon after. Subsequently, I plan to marry Hareton Earnshaw. I now live at Wuthering Heights with Heathcliff, Hareton, and Joseph.
Education
Well-educated
Lives In
Thrushcross Grange
Catherine Linton
Work Experience
Status Update
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"He drove him from their company to the servants, deprived him of the instructions of the curate, and insisted that he should labour out of doors instead; compelling him to do so as hard as any other lad on the farm." Chapter 6, p. 39
None (Gentry)
About
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I am the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Earnshaw. I grew up with with my sister Catherine Earnshaw and the gypsy my father adopted, Heathcliff. I resent him for the close relationships he built with my father and sister. I despise him with a burning passion, and I wish he were dead. I was glad that I was sent away to college for three years to learn and grow both as a student and a person, and I found my one true love, Frances. Upon returning home to the Heights, I had mixed feelings for the loss of my father because he favored Heathcliff more than I. I finally had the chance to rule over Heathcliff and Wuthering Heights.
Education
I was educated by my father until I was seventeen, then was sent away to college. My education was cut short however when my father died and I had to take over control of Wuthering Heights.
Lives In
Wuthering Heights
Hindley Earnshaw
Work Experience
Status Update
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Servant/Laborer
About
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I was adopted by the Earnshaws at about six years old and was a common laborer found in Liverpool. I quickly became Mr. Earnshaw's favorite son and was greatly resented by Hindley. Catherine Earnshaw and I become inseperable, leaving Hindley to fend for himself, furthering his resentment for me. After Mr. Earnshaw died, Hindley gained ownership of Wuthering Heights and reduced me to a servant. Over the next several years, my resentment grew for Hindley as I strived to gain Cahty's heart. I later left the only life I knew behind to seek higher social status in hopes that Cathy would marry me. Three years later, I returned to Wuthering Heights only to figure out that Cathy was married to Edgar Linton.
Education
Brief Education
Lives In
Wuthering Heights
Heathcliff
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Ellen Dean (Nelly)/Joseph

“I have not broken your heart - you have broken it - and in breaking it, you have broken mine ... I forgive what you have done to me. I love my murderer - but yours! How can I?” Chapter 15, p. 139
Well educated
British Social Classes

1. Royalty
2. Aristocracy
3. Gentry
4. Lower Classes (makes up the majority of the population)
Social Class Descriptions
* Aristocrats had a secure social status because they had official titles.
* Gentry had a fragile social status even though they usually had large estates and servants.
* Most Gentry had no title and their social status was subject to change.
* In order to determine if someone was a gentleman or not, you must consider the following: the amount of land he owned, how many servants he had, if he kept a horse and carriage, and if his money came from land or banking and commercial activities.
* Earning money through banking and commercial activites was seen as less prestigious than inheriting money through family.
Social Class Passage 1:
"Mr. Hindley came home to the funeral; and-a thing that amazed us and set the neighbors gossiping right and left-he brought a wife with him. What she was, and where she was born, he never informed us: probably, she had neither money nor name to recommend her, or he would scarcely have kept the union with his father."
Chapter 6, p. 38
Social Class Passage 2:
"Cathy stayed at Thrushcross Grange five weeks: till Christmas. By that time her ankle was thoroughly cured, and her manners much improved. The mistress visited her often in the interval, and commenced her plan of reform by trying to raise her self-respect with fine clothes and flattery, which she took readily: so that, instead of a wild, hatless little savage jumping into the house, and rushing to squeeze us all breathless, there lighted from a handsome black pony a very dignified person, with brown ringlets falling from the cover of a feathered beaver, and a long cloth habit, which she was obliged to hold up with both hands that she might sail in." Chapter 7, p. 45


Social Class Passage 3:
"Now fully revealed by the fire and candlelight, I was amazed, more than ever, to behold the transformation of Heathcliff. He had grown a tall, athletic, well-formed man; beside whom, my master seemed quite slender and youth-like. His upright carriage suggested the idea of his having been in the army. His countenance was much older in expression and decison of feature than Mr. Linton's; it looked intelligent, and retained no marks of former degradation. A half-civilized ferocity lurked yet in the depressed brows and eyes full of black fire, but it was subdued; and his manner was even dignified: quite divested of roughness, though too stern for grace."
Chapter 10, p. 83
Connection: The Industrial Revolution in England
*In 1801 the Industrial Revolution was under way in England; when Emily Brontë was writing in 1847, it was a dominant force in English economy and society, and the traditional relationship of social classes was being disrupted by mushroom-new fortunes and an upwardly-aspiring middle class.
Citations
* http://www.shmoop.com/wuthering-heights/society-class-quotes-3.html

*http://academic.brooklyn.cuny.edu/english/melani/novel_19c/wuthering/economic.html

*http://classiclit.about.com/od/wutheringheightsbronte/a/aa_wutheringquo_2.htm

*http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/wuthering/summary.html
Full transcript