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Mass Incarceration & Racial Injustice in the Criminal Justic

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Vance White

on 14 January 2014

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Transcript of Mass Incarceration & Racial Injustice in the Criminal Justic

What is Mass Incarceration?
Mass Incarceration is when a lot of people are put into prison.
This Is Wrong!
Many black and Hispanic males are being discriminated against and sent to prison based on their skin color, their ancestry and the things they do which results in mass incarceration.
"The New Jim Crow:...""
The ancestry (slavery) and the denial of citizenship of African-Americans has evolved but has remained the same over time. According to "The New Jim Crow", "An extraordinary percentage of black men in the US are legally barred from voting today..."
Stop & Frisk
In today's society, a federal law,
Stop & Frisk
was passed to "ensure the safety of the people." However, it is against the Fourth Amendment and is just an excuse to racially profile people. After all, police officers stop and frisk primarily and target black African-American males who "look" suspicious. They aren't suspicious...they seem to be suspicious".
The Issue with the Stop & Frisk law
The NYPD’s stop-and-frisk practices raise serious concerns over racial profiling, illegal stops and privacy rights. The Department’s own reports on its stop-and-frisk activity confirm what many people in communities of color across the city have long known: The police are stopping hundreds of thousands of law abiding New Yorkers every year, and the vast majority are black and Latino.

An analysis by the NYCLU revealed that innocent New Yorkers have been subjected to police stops and street interrogations more than 4 million times since 2002, and that black and Latino communities continue to be the overwhelming targets of these tactics. Nearly nine out of 10 stopped-and-frisked New Yorkers have been completely innocent, according to the NYPD’s own reports. ~NYCLU
Mass Incarceration & Racial Injustice in the Criminal Justice System by Vance White & Danee Forgenie
What is racial injustice?
Racial injustice is when people are discriminated against or judged by the pigment and tone of their skin.
"Lockdown" by Walter Dean Myers
Reese, a 15 year old African-American male, has been sent to jail from drug dealing. However, in his experience, Reese is racially profiled by a security guard, Mr.Pugh.
The Fourth Amendment
It's against the Fourth Amendment which says: " A search or seizure is generally unreasonable and unconstitutional if conducted without a valid warrant and the police must obtain a warrant whenever practicable." Searches and seizures without a warrant are not considered unreasonable if one of the specifically established and well-delineated exceptions to the warrant requirement applies. These exceptions apply "[o]nly in those exceptional circumstances in which special needs, beyond the normal need for law enforcement, makes the warrant and probable cause requirement impracticable."
Mass Incarceration
According to the Center for Constitutional Rights, there is a fight against racial profiling and discriminatory laws that lead to a disproportionate number of black males in prison. According to The Huffington Post,
there are more African-Americans under correctional control today--in prison or on probation/parole--than there were enslaved in 1850 before the Civil War.
Cause of Mass Incarceration
According to
The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration,
drugs and drug dealing amongst black males is the biggest and most common cause of mass incarceration.
Our Argument
We think the United States is doing the most. We know the government means well and is trying hard to secure the rights given to us by our founding fathers, but all of the action behind it isn't necessary. We find it superfluous to continue to make laws against the acts of the people. For example, the Stop & Frisk policy. According our research, there isn't much coming out of this. We thought the policy was supposed to be used to ensure safety amongst the people. It doesn't seem like it. It seems like an excuse to violate our privacy. 9 out of 10 stops have shown to be acts of racial profiling of black and Latino males and many have proven to be innocent. The Stop & Frisk policy is based upon the assumptions and opinions of the police.
In addition, it does not uphold the Fourth Amendment, a document which protects and approves our natural human rights as people. The Fourth Amendment also protects our privacy unlike the judgments of the Stop & Frisk policy. Other superfluous laws passed by the New York State are the "Rockefeller Drug Laws." We see no purpose in this law, however I see the effort behind it. We are 12 years old and we've seen less of the world than they have, so we know that they know no matter what law they pass, people will always find a way to obtain drugs and marijuana (cannabis), which is a herb that helps relieve stress and calm the nerves. The strictest government hones the sneakiest citizens. In other countries such as Britain and Spain, there seems to be a more non-bias and a reconcilable society. The U.S has put more people behind bars five times as many per capita compared with Britain or Spain. We believe most of the US can find other ways to control the criminal activity than racial profiling and throwing people in jail.
Treaty of Reconciliation
Since the government doesn't realize it's faults and the flaws in their efforts to ensure to safety and restore order, we are going to make them. Since we've already demonstrated and protested, we will try a different and a more direct strategy. Like our Founding Fathers, we are going to write a treaty but between the citizens and the government, restating the rights we have as a nation and individuals and ask for equality, protection and privacy. We will also ask that we are allowed to do the things we should be able to do within our communities such as walk down the street without being suspicious. We will select one representative from every state to ratify the treaty. We will care to use statistics and opinions from each citizen to support each statement in the agreement. Finally we will also ask that they try to pull the nation together without invading the privacy of its people.
Thank you for your time and patience! Stand up for what you believe is right! Let us stop the racial injustice and mass incarceration that is overlooked by our government. Convince the government to implement better strategies of reform.
Black and Hispanic males from the ages 13-25 are targeted by police officers all over the country. Police officers stop and frisk people, primarily black and Hispanic males, frequently due to assumption. They also racial profile them in the process. I don't think this fair. Do you?
"Latinos and the U.S. Justice System"
Latinos were portrayed as "powerless" and "failures" via television programming network and media portrayals in 1992. Latinos have one in six chances of being in jail. They also are three times as likely to be arrested for drug use than African-Americans, the group with the highest incarceration rate. A stereotype of Latinos is that Latinos commit majority of the crimes in California.
More Racial Injustices
African Americans: Whites
Population- 13%: 67%
Arrests- 28%: 70%
Inmates- 40%: 40%
Death Row- 42%: 56%

Death row is a place, usually a section in a prison, where prisoners awaiting execution are held.

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