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Lecture: Functional Grammar

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by

Kathy Mills

on 13 September 2013

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Transcript of Lecture: Functional Grammar

Nominalisation
Clauses & Phrases
Functional Grammar
SentenceMoods
Circumstances (e.g. at the Ekka)
Participants
(e.g. favourite celebrity)
Important
Details
(cc) photo by Metro Centric on Flickr
(cc) photo by Franco Folini on Flickr
(cc) photo by jimmyharris on Flickr
Processes (e.g. is rock climbing)
(cc) photo by Metro Centric on Flickr
Social Context
Genre (e.g. persuasive text)
Tenor (Roles and Relationships)
Mode (e.g. spoken)
Medium (e.g. book)
Subject Matter (e.g. biodiversity)
Text type (e.g. advertisement)
What have we learned?
Verb
Adjectives
Declarative - Beadles sells
great salads.
Interrogative - Who
makes the best coffee
around here?
Imperative - Give me one regular espresso.
Exclamation: This coffee tastes divine!
Modality
Genres & Text Types
High - must,
ought, certain
Low - can, may,
possibly
Information Report
Explanation
Recount
Exposition
Response
Procedural
Narrative
Cohesion - making
connections
Reference
(e.g. he, she, them, those, more, less)
Ellipsis & Substitutions
(e.g. one, some)
Lexical Cohesion
(e.g. synonyms, antonyms,repetition)
Text connectives
(e.g. so, as a result, accordingly, first, even so, though, for instance, in fact)
Brainstorm five grammar
concepts that can help to
improve student writing.
(e.g. subject-verb agreement)
Transitivity
By: Dr. Kathy A. Mills
QUT - Australia
Participants can include pronouns
Pronouns are used to refer to a participant already named in the text
Personal: I, me, you, him, he, it, we, us, they, them, she, her
Possessive: mine, his, hers, yours, theirs, its
Subject-verb agreement
(e.g. The best way to keep your class happy are to give them enough responsibilities.
Consistent Tense
(e.g. Mark wanted to know why Rebecca is sad, but she will not tell him)
Double Negatives
(e.g. I don't have nothing to say.)
Dangling Modifiers
(e.g. Thomas told her that he wanted to marry her frequently.
Usage - keep it simple and brief
Omit unnecessary words and use vocabulary correctly.(e.g. You should remember to consult your watch in order to keep a person from waiting for you when you have decided to meet them at a particular time.)
Examples of Sub-ordinating
conjunctions:
-although -wherever
-when -as soon as
-if -whenever
-despite -even though
TENSE
- I am liking Brave,
the movie.
- I liked Brave, the
movie.
- I will like Brave, the
movie.
- I like Brave, the
movie.
More examples:
Active: We developed a new solution.
Passive: A new solution was developed.
Active:People are destroying whole species of frogs.
Passive: Frog species are becoming extinct.
Full transcript