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Egyptian Influence on Greek Art

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Meg Prince

on 15 June 2015

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Transcript of Egyptian Influence on Greek Art

MID BRONZE AGE
With ever increasing technological advances starting in the early bronze age, the ability to gather enough of a surplus assisted in the ability to trade both on land and overseas. It was from this breakthrough in the exchanging of goods that the Greeks were able to incorporate foreign influences into their arts.
LATE BRONZE AGE
On the mainland Mycenaean civilization flourished. Trade increased, which is apparent by the numerous Mycenaean goods found throughout Egypt. This increase in trade allowed for the accumulation of wealth which was displayed in the form of grave goods such as pottery, weapons, and jewelry. Graves grew more elaborate with the construction of large tombs.
Dark Age
TIMELINE
Egyptian Influence on Greek Art
ARCHAIC PERIOD
Population and societal regrowth developed into an expansion of sophistication in technology. This was a great benefit in terms of trade, not only for wealth through exportation but inspiration received from goods imported from overseas. Pottery developed into something unlike anything seen in the past. Statues, both lifesize and larger, began to appear. Architecture changed as the skills learned from Egyptian architects developed. Limestone and marble became increasingly popular.
2100-1600 BCE
The second grand palace at Knossos arose in 1700 BCE. Overseas trade brought in an array of precious goods and metals. Objects such as musical instruments were introduced and were depicted in their art. The sistrum, a rattle type instrument, appears in various scenes in pottery and paintings. The sistrum's Egyptian origins date back to the Old Kingdom over a thousand years prior.
Minoans
c. 1900-1450 BCE
Harvester Vase
This time in Egypt: 1st Intermediate Period-Middle Kingdom
Queen Nefertari holding a sistrum
c. 1600-1200 BCE
This time in Egypt: 2nd Intermediate Period-New Kingdom
Tholos Tomb
Graves grew more elaborate with the construction of large tholos tombs and the quantity of goods that were left inside. One such tomb is known as the Tomb of Atreus. It's construction includes various chambers which hold treasures along with the deceased, not unlike Egyptian mastabas and pyramids. The façade was brightly painted in a manner similar to that of the Egyptian temples.
Tholos Tomb Façade
Goods within the tomb included items such as pottery decorated in a fashion that takes after imagery found in Egyptian art. This Egyptian tomb wall painting depicts women mourning the deceased, while a woman mourns the departing warriors in similar stance on a Mycenaean vase.
CITATIONS
Uluburun
MID BRONZE AGE
PICTURES
Harvester Vase Full:
https://classconnection.s3.amazonaws.com/168/flashcards/1808168/jpg/janson_chapter_4-131351562180273.jpg

Harvester Vase Sistrum:
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schnittervase#/media/File:Schnittervase_Relief_16-9_04.jpg

Nefertari Sistrum:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/51/Abu_Simbel_Nefartari_Sistrum-2.jpg
LATE BRONZE AGE
PICTURES
Tholos Tomb Diagram:
http://www.greeceancientmodern.com/TreasuryAtreus.jpg

Tholos Tomb Exterior:
http://classics.unc.edu/files/2014/05/MY-TrAtr.jpg

Tholos Tomb Facade:
http://classics.unc.edu/files/2014/05/MY-TrAtr2.jpg

Egyptian Temple at Philae
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8b/Egypt_Temple_Philae.jpg

Egyptian Mastaba:
https://ucfant3145f09-04.wikispaces.com/file/view/Mastaba_diagram.jpg/108058695/350x239/Mastaba_diagram.jpg

Warrior Vase Mourner:
https://c3.staticflickr.com/7/6022/5923219685_54aa1135c5_b.jpg

TT55 Mourning Women:
https://c4.staticflickr.com/4/3735/11207456605_dff63a225d_b.jpg

PICTURES
Progogeometric Vase:
http://www.britishmuseum.org/explore/highlights/highlight_image.aspx?image=ps337302.jpg&retpage=18218

Geometric Vase:
http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/14.130.14
DARK AGE
ARCHAIC PERIOD
PICTURES
Peplos Kore:
http://www.classics.cam.ac.uk/museum/museum-images/peplos-kore

Kouros
:
http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/32.11.1

Statue of Rahotep & Nofret:
http://www.ancient-egypt.org/who-is-who/r/rahotep-and-nofret.html

Standing Statue:
http://albertis-window.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Menkaure-and-Queen-2490-2472-BCE.jpg

Kroisos:
https://classconnection.s3.amazonaws.com/1878/flashcards/765035/jpg/6a-3-3.jpg

Dying Warrior from the West Pediment of the Temple of Aphaia:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1c/Aphaia_pediment_warrior_W-VII_Glyptothek_Munich_79.jpg

Dying Warrior from the East Pediment of the Temple of Aphaia:
https://klimtlover.files.wordpress.com/2012/09/dying-warrior-east-pediment.jpg

VIDEO
Kore:
youtube.com/watch?v=RjpT4Apgda8


CLASSICAL PERIOD
HELLENISTIC
Tholos Tomb
Painted Replication
of Facade
Old Kingdom Mastaba
Tholos Tomb
Mycenaean Warrior Vase
Egyptian Painting from Tomb TT55
1200-750 BCE
750-480 BCE
This time in Egypt: Late New Kingdom-3rd Intermediate Period
This Time in Egypt: Late Period
While the production of statues of lifesize stature and larger were reletively new to Greece, the Egyptians had been building them for thousands of years. What the Greeks developed was the "freestanding form". Popular designs were the male youth (kouros) and the maiden (kore).
Development of Sculpture
Kouros
Variation from Egypt
Stance and shape remain recognizable traits between the Greek kouros statues and the Egyptian figures. However with creation of the freestanding sculpture, the Greeks had eliminated the need for a support block behind the figure.
The Use of Color
Taking after their Egyptian Counterparts, scuptures were fully
painted in vibrant colors.
Painted Representation
of the Peplos Kore
The Statues of
Rahotep and Nofret
Unlike the Egyptian statues, the Greek form continued to slowly evolve into a more lifelike and fluid structure.
Realism and Form
CLASSICAL PERIOD
480-323 BCE
Even in a time spotted with war, sculpture and architecture continued to refine forms. As a result of the war with Persia, Greeks purposely began to push away from near-eastern influences and it's rigid style in favor of a more expressive and active form.
This Time in Egypt: Late Period
Hellenistic Period
The Ptolemaic reign in Egypt began shortly after the death of Alexander the Great and it's artistic influence lasted nearly 300 years. Greek design was intertwined with the conquering of Egypt. Most art from this period is depicted in the form of statuary.
Experimentation
Sculptures began to experiment with different forms of emotion, especially agony.
The Female Nude
Terracotta
Subject Matter
Egyptian Greeks
323-30 BCE
This Time in Egypt: Ptolemaic Period
PICTURES
Lacoon and His Sons
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/17/Laocoon_Pio-Clementino_Inv1059-1064-1067.jpg
Bathing Aphrodite with Eros
http://www.theoi.com/image/S10.17Aphrodite.jpg
Girl Standing
http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/07.286.31
Two Girls Playing a Game Known as Ephedrismos
http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/07.286.4
Standing Woman
http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/09.221.28
Childbirth Scene
http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/74.51.2698
Statuette of an African (known as Ethiopian)
http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/18.145.10
Arsinoe II
http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/the-collection-online/search/545764
Ptolomy XII
http://usercontent2.hubimg.com/9046239_f248.jpg
Cleopatra VII
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-tU7-fFQCVGc/T6k6jUo9PNI/AAAAAAAADb4/Xm6BzI2JIzk/s640/Hermitage.jpg
Lacoon and His Sons
Bathing Aphrodite With Eros
The variety in female statues expanded. More often they were depicted nude. The form was more active and they were often crouching down or bathing.
Greece's Ptolemy I was the first of the line of Ptolemies to occupy Egypt and insert themselves as Pharoahs. Reversely, they incorporated parts of Greek art into traditional Egyptian imagery.
Statuette of Arsinoe II for her Posthumous Cult
Cleopatra VII
Protogeometric Vase
Geometric Vase
Overseas trade had virtually stopped along with any influences that would come with it. The Greeks were unable to take advantage of the art that flourished during Egypt's most glorious days. Despite the lack of direct influence, the Greeks significantly improved their pottery techniques, paving the way to the formation of Corinthian pottery.
Ptolomy XII
Small statuettes became popular for personal use rather than for religion. These were often painted in shades of black, reds, skin tones, and rarely, blues. The subject matter focused more on personal and everyday lives rather than of goddesses and gods.
Girl Standing
Two Girls Playing a Game Known as Ephedrismos
Standing Woman
With the shift away from the focus of religion, sculptures took form in a variety of people, including different ages, social classes, and even varying ethnicities. Realism and individualism became important.
Childbirth Scene
Statuette of an African (known as Ethiopian)
END
Egyptian Tomb at Philae
Painted Replication
Egyptian Variance
While much of Egyptian art remained consistant, it's depiction of the human form continued to portray an ever increasing amount of individualism. This is reflected in Greek imagery as well.
Statuette of a Woman
Ritual Figure
PICTURES
Caryatid
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Caryatid_Erechtheion_BM_Sc407.jpg

Discus Thrower
http://bachperformance.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/medium_8330173857.jpg

Grave Stele of a Little Girl
http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/27.45

Temple of Hatshepsut
http://www.crystalinks.com/TempleofHatshepsut.html

Ramesseum
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/ee/Ramesseum_08.JPG

Acropolis
http://users.clas.ufl.edu/karelisa/Athens%20images/acropolis_panorama.jpg

Statuette of a Woman
http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/30.8.93

Ritual Figure
http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/2003.154
TEMPLES
The Egyptians were no strangers to
building monumental temples. The Greeks learned much in the way of architecture.
Temple of Hatshepsut
Acropolis
Ramesseum
Sculpture in Movement
Discus Thrower
Caryatid
Individualism
Even portraiture in funerary steles were customized.
Grave Stele of a Little Girl

Middle Bronze Age 2100-1600

Late Bronze Age 1600-1200
Dark Age 1200-750
Archaic Period 750-480
Classical Period 480-323
Hellenistic Period 323-30
Old Kingdom 2600-2150
1st Intermediate Period 2150-1940
Middle Kingdom 1940-1600
2nd Intermediate Period 1600-1550
New Kingdom 1550-1070
3rd Intermediate Period 1070-650
Late Period 650-323
Ptolemaic Period 323-30
Egyptian
Greek
Created by: Meghan Prince
Davies, Penelope J.E., et. al. Janson's History of Art: The Western Tradition. 7th ed. New Jersey: Pearson Education Inc, 2007. Print.

Pomeroy, Sarah B., et.al. A Brief History of Ancient Greece: Politics, Society, and Culture. 3rd ed. New York: Oxford UP, 2014. Print.
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