Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Flowers For Algernon Artistic Depiction

No description
by

Ashley Ryan

on 5 March 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Flowers For Algernon Artistic Depiction

1. Emotions "He wrote something down on paper and I got skared of failing the test" (3) "I felt good when he said not everybody with an eye-Q of 68 had that thing like I had it" (9) "Burt said yes and he smiled and that maid me feel good" (2) 2. Desires "He said...I was her bestest pupil in the Beekman School for retarded adults and I tried the hardist becaus I reely wantd to lern I wantid it more even then pepul who are smarter even then me" (4) "all my life I wantid to be smart and not dumb" (4) "I want to get smart if they will let me" (4) "I said...but I dont even care if it herts or anything because Im strong and I will werk hard" (4) "I just want to be smart like other pepul so I can have lots of friends who like me" (13) 3. Perceptions "Then when I am smart they will talk to me and I can sit with them and listen like Joe Carp and Frank and Gimpy do..." (15) 3. Perceptions "Then when I am smart they will talk to me and I can sit with them and listen like Joe Carp and Frank and Gimpy do when they talk and have a discushen about important things" (15) "If your smart you can have lots of friends to talk to and you never get lonley by yourself all the time" (15) "What do smart pepul think about or remebir. Fancy things I bet." (16) "When I become intelligent the way Prof. Nemur says, with much more than twice my I.Q> of 70, then maybe people will like me and be my friends." (49) 4. Memories "I dont remembir how to prey to him but I think mom use to make me prey to him a lot when I was a kid that he should make me get better and not be sick." (19) "When I once tolld my mom I wantid to be a painter like Uncle Herman my sister Norma said yeah Charlies going to be the artist of the family. And dad slappd her face and tolld her not to be so goddam nasty to her brother." (32) "Then I saw a picture that I remembered in my mind when I was a kid and the children in the block let me play with them, hide-and-go-seek and I was it. After I counted...I kept looking until it got cold and dark and I had to go home." (41-42) "He's better off dead. He'll never be able to live a normal life. He'll be better off--" (185) 1. Emotions "I was excited at the thought of seeing him." (181) "Somehow I've become separated emotionally from everyone and everything." (202) "And what I was really searching for...was a way to make myself a part of people again emotionally, while still retaining my freedom intellectually." (202-203) 2. Desires 3. Perceptions "Then when I am smart they will talk to me and I can sit with them and listen like Joe Carp and Frank and Gimpy do..." (15) 3. Perceptions "I had that written down in my progress reports, at the time...though I didn't understand at the time what you meant by it. But that's beside point because I'm aware of it now." (218) "Days--I've been thinking, reading, and writing; and nights--wandering in search of myself. And I've discovered that Charlie is watching me." (201) Knowledge/Understanding "It's as if all the knowledge I've soaked in during the past months has coalesced and lifted me to a peak of light and understanding. This is beauty, love, and truth all rolled into one. This is joy." (241) "For the first time, I'm afraid of the future." (258) "I am afraid. Not of life, or death, or nothingness, but of wasting it as if I had never been." (284) "I don't pretend to understand the mystery of love, but this time it was more than sex, more than using a woman's body. It was being lifted off the earth, outside fear and torment, being part of something greater than myself." (293) 4. Memories "I can't help it! He's got to go! We've got her to think about. I won't have her come home from school crying every day like this because the children tease her. We can't destroy her chance for a normal life because of him." (184) "You can be proud of me now and tell all the neighbors. You don't have to hide me in the cellar when company comes." (264) "She blamed Matt for not watching me, for leaving us alone together, and she beat me with a strap until I was nearly unconscious. Do you remember it? Did it really happen that way?" (272) Charlie communicates what he saw on the ink spills during his testing before the operation. Before Charlie has undergone the surgery and gained knowledge, he experiences everyday emotions, like happiness, sadness, and fear. Charlie experiences fear and anxiety when he is unable to find the picture on the inkblot during Burt's testing. When Dr. Strauss tells Charlie that he has something very good ("motor-vation"). Charlie is pleased. Charlie explains to Prof. Nemur why he wanted to learn to read ans spell. When Prof. Nemur explains that Charlie is doing something great for science, Charlie does not care. His concern is socially focused. When Prof. Nemur explains the uncertainty of the experiment on humans, Charlie still believes that he wants the procedure, but obviously, he is unable to understand the ramifications. Miss Kinnian expressed to Dr. Strauss how hard Charlie has worked and how much Charlie really wants to learns. Charlie desperately wants the operation and is hoping they that they are able to get permission from his family. Before Charlie undergoes surgery and gains knowledge, he only wants to be smart in order to fit in and have friends. Although Charlie does not like preparing progress reports, he realizes that it is part of science and that he has to try to be smart so he can join in discussions with his friends. Charlie thinks about Joe, Frank, and Gimpy and believes people who are smart have many friends. While Charlie is recovering from the operation, he wonders how he can think like a smart person and imagines what they must think about. Charlie, although angry upon the realization that at times people made fun of him, believes that once he acquires intelligence, he will be accepted and have friends. Prior to gaining knowledge, Charlie believes that if he is smart, he will automatically have many friends who like him. When Burt and Charlie have lunch at the college restaurant, Burt tells Charlie that college kids are discussing art, politics, and religion. The word "religion" triggers his mind to remember his previous association with the word. Dr. Strauss gives Charlie sleeping pills so he can get lots of rest. These sleeping pills remind Charlie of his Uncle Herman, who was a painter and used to sleep all the time. After going out with Joe and Frank to a party where Charlie is brutally teased, Charlie recalls enduring the same kind of treatment when he was younger by kids on the block. Before Charlie has acquired knowledge, he is able to recall some memories, but he does not have any emotional reaction to these memories. Charlie explains to Alice that part of him is the Charlie that is afraid of women because of his mother and that part of him has not matured emotionally. Charlie, while immersed in work at the lab, contemplates the joy and energy he gets from learning and knowledge. Charlie comes to the realization that what happened to Algernon’s brain might well happen to his and he is scared. Charlie has an appointment with Dr. Strauss and as he lies on the couch experiencing a series of strange sensations and visions, one of them being fear. After Charlie is finally able to make love to Alice, he realizes that his feelings for Alice are unable to be explained and are something bigger than himself. Charlie, having warm memories of his father, is excited to see his father after more than fifteen years, as he plans to visit him at the barbershop. Charlie continues to explain to Alice that what he has always wanted was to be emotionally connected to people and to be intelligent at the same time. While visiting his mother, Norma comes home and they discuss the past and why Charlie was send away. Charlie asks Norma about his memory of the incident in the basement when they were playing together and Norma bumped her head. Charlie needs approval from his mother and despite her cruelty to him in the past, wants her to be proud of him. While still in the barber’s chair at his father’s shop, the memories of his mother’s cruel words seep into Charlie’s mind. As Charlie is resting in the barber’s chair with pads of cotton over his eyes, after failing to let his father know that he was Charlie and not just a random customer, memories coming flooding back of his mother’s insistence that Charlie be put away. "I've got to know what's going to happen while I'm still enough in control to be able to do something about it." (220) Charlie, realizing that his intelligence may be temporary and that he may end up institutionalized, wants to visit Warren. "I dont know any work but the job I use to do at the bakery. I dont want to go back their because they all knew me when I was smart and maybe theyll laff at me." (306) Charlie contemplates what he can do when Mrs. Mooney, his landlady, tells him he should get a job. Eventually, after the surgery, Charlie realizes that his desire for friends, cannot be fulfilled by an increase in intellect. Charlie longingly wants true friends and the ability to keep his intellect at the same time. "When I was retarded I had lots of friends. Now I have no one. Oh, I know lots of people. Lots and lots of people. But I don't have any real friends." (249-250) "You've got to understand, I'm not the same as I was. I've changed. I'm normal now. Don't you understand? I'm not retarded any more." (263) "Maybe that's why it was so important for me to learn. I thought it would make people like me. I thought I would have friends. That's something to laugh at, isn't it?" (299-300) "Its easy to have frends if you let pepul laff at you. Im going to have lots of frends where I go." (311) Charlie decides that is time for his to go to the Warren Home school. He gives Prof. Nemur advice on how to have more friends. After Alice leaves, Charlie recalls the conservation that transpired between them and that he explained to Alice his perception of what learning would do for him. Charlie visits his mother and is desperate to show her that he is intelligent now. Charlie compares the friends that he had when he retarded to the friends that he has now that he is intelligent. Charlie's perceptions change after his surgery, especially as they relate to friendship. After Charlie has acquired knowledge, those Charlie once thought of as friends, his gang at the bakery, he now views men who just used him for their cruel entertainment. However, as Charlie's intellect declines, he reunites with the "gang" and realizes they really were his friends. After the surgery, Charlie is able to recover, reflect, and make sense of many of his memories, which leads to his understanding of who Charlie was and is. After the surgery, Charlie understands his past and how people viewed him, including his family. This realization results in a range of emotions including sadness, anger, desire, and fear. Additionally, Charlie is able to understand why he feels these emotions. Charlie explains to Alice what he has been doing with his time and why he has not been contact with them. Nemur, while explaining to Charlie that they still have the highest hopes of permanence for Charlie’s intelligence, also claims that they tried to make it clear to Charlie that the intelligence may be temporary. Charlie understands that now, but did not understand it then. "I passed your floor on the way up, and now I'm passing it on the way down, and I don't think I'll be taking this elevator again. So let's just say good-bye here and now." (288-2889) While Charlie is undergoing testing with Burt, he explains that Burt cannot really empathize with what he is going through. He adds that they do not happen to belong on the same level. Once Charlie has undergone surgery and gained knowledge, he is able to really understand things he could never before. Additionally, Charlie's understanding goes beyond the surface level. http://www.askamathematician.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/Elevator.gif http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2005/jun/02/farout http://missjenniferwatson.blogspot.com/2010/12/romance-me-rain.html http://www.examiner.com/article/the-evolution-of-robert-pattinson-his-many-lives http://www.loisgreenfield.com/galleries/dance/2662/antigravity.html
Full transcript