Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

The New Yorker

No description
by

Kagan McSpadden

on 23 October 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of The New Yorker

1925
Harold Ross launches
the New Yorker
1926
E.B. White is hired
Peter Arno does the first of his
ninety-nine covers for the
magazine—typically full-page,
dark-wash drawings of wealthy
New York men and ample showgirls
1948
John O’Hara joins and begins
his almost 40 years as
a contributor to the magazine
1929
After the stock market crash
the, the 'Notes and Comment'
section includes the comforting
recommendation “Try and catch
a little sleep. Mother is near.”
1930
Ogden Nash publishes
his first poem in The New
Yorker, “Invocation.”
1933
first cartoon
published by
Charles Addams
He will eventually contribute
78 covers and 1200+ cartoons
1935
Office moves to
25 W 43rd street
1936
Gill and Liebing come to
the magazine and establish a
reputation for Theater and Architecture
1939
Hamburg joins the team.
He will eventually write for almost
every section including WWII and
14 Presidential Inaugurations
1941
Steinberg joins the team,
his presence will help to
define the magazine
1946
Hiroshima issue published
the entire issue devoted to
one story
E.B. White's comments on a
global government spark controversy
1951
Harold Ross passes away
William Shawn is new editor
1957
Balliett begins tenure
as jazz critic
1962
Angell joins as baseball
corespondent
1965
'In Cold Blood' published
in four issues, acclaimed
as a triumph in
literary Journalism
1967
Schell 'The Village of Ben Suc' is
published in the magazine, chronicling the demolition of a South
Vietnamese village, later published
in his book
1968
Kael began reviewing film
1973
Croce begins
reviewing dance
1985
Fleischmann family sells
The New Yorker to Advance
Publications, Inc.
1987
Robert Gottlieb
as new editor in chief
1988
Neil Sheehan’s four-part “An American
Soldier in Vietnam” is published.
The articles become the book
“A Bright Shining Lie,” which wins
the Pulitzer Prize.
1991
The New Yorker moves its offices from 25 West Forty-third Street to 20 West Forty-third Street.
1992
Tina Brown succeeds Robert
Gottlieb as editor. The magazine
introduces a substantial redesign
with the October 5th issue.
1993
“Maus: A Survivor’s Tale,”
depicts a Hasidic Jew embracing
a black woman, and provokes a
national discussion
1995
The New Yorker wins its first
National Magazine Award for
General Excellence
1998
David Remnick succeeds
Tina Brown, becoming the
fifth editor of the magazine.
1999
The New Yorker officially becomes
part of Condé Nast Publications,
and moves from 20 West Forty-third
Street to 4 Times Square.
2000
The New Yorker celebrates its
seventy-fifth anniversary
Wins National award for General Excellence.
Holds its first annual literary
and art festival in Manhattan.
2001
The magazine launches its
editorial Web site, newyorker.com
2004
The New Yorker’s circulation
passes one million
“The Complete Cartoons of
The New Yorker,” including
every cartoon printed since
the start of the magazine, is
published in a book and on
two CDs
2009
The New Yorker débuts
on Kindle and Nook
2010
The New Yorker wins three
National Magazine Awards:
Photo Portfolio, Public Interest,
and Reviews and Criticism.
Launch of the ipad app
2011
The New Yorker wins a
National Magazine Award
for Public Interest for Atul
Gawande’s “Letting Go.”
2012
The New Yorker launches
The Political Scene,
an online hub for its coverage
of the Presidential election
campaign
.
Questions?
The New Yorker
Kagan McSpadden and Whitney Cavin
Full transcript