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Animal Farm - Rhetoric

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kristy montoya

on 29 October 2014

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Transcript of Animal Farm - Rhetoric

Significant Uses of Rhetoric
In the novel Animal Farm, one character who consistently makes use of rhetoric throughout is the pig Squealer. He makes multiple speeches over the course of the novel, one particular example being his speech in chapter 7 about Snowball.
Techniques and Effects
Rhetoric is often made effective through the use of rhetorical appeals (pathos, ethos and logos). When used correctly, these appeals make the argument more convincing. However, fallacies can also be present in rhetoric, decreasing its effectiveness.
Rhetorical Appeals
Pathos (Emotions)
Ethos (Morals, Beliefs, Credibility)
Examples of ethos in Squealer's speech:
1. "Our leader, Comrade Napoleon," announced Squealer, speaking very slowly and firmly, "Has announced categorically—categorically, comrade!—that Snowball was Jones' agent from the very beginning..."
Examples of pathos:
1. "And do you not remember, too, that it was just at that moment, when panic was spreading, and all seemed lost, that Comrade Napoleon sprang forward qitha cry of "Death to humanity!" and sunk his teeth into Jones' leg?"
Fallacies & Response
Examples of Fallacies
Other Animals' Response
1. (Appeals to False Authority) "Our leader, Comrade Napoleon," announced Squealer, speaking very slowly and firmly, "Has announced categorically—categorically, comrade!—that Snowball was Jones' agent from the very beginning..."

Squealer uses this speech, like with all the rest, to persuade the other animals at Animal Farm to follow what the pigs want them to do. This speech in particular has them believing that Snowball was a traitor from the start, going so far as to put false memories into their heads.
Purpose
When looking at these speeches it is important to ask if they are being used for the purpose of good or evil. While the animals who hear these speeches are conditioned to think they are for a good purpose, it is easy to tell from an outsider's point of view the intent is more pernicious.
Is It Convincing?
It takes a lot to make a convincing argument—reasons, appeals, delivery. The speaker is also an important part; even the best argument fails if the speaker lacks the talent to deliver. Through his impressive use of reasoning and delivery, Squealer manages to make all of his arguments convincing.
Squealer seems to have a very good idea of what appeals are the most likely to have the others agreeing or complying with his requests. Also, his use of language, either unnecessarily complicated to intimidate the other animals or overly simplified to limit debate, is especially effective.
Full transcript