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Ableism

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by

Daniel Echevarria

on 5 October 2013

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Transcript of Ableism

How does being able-bodied
privilege a person?
Examples?
Breaking Bad
Cerebral Palsy
"A term used to describe normal
assumptions and practices that often lead
to unequal treatment of people with
apparent or assumed physical, mental,
behavioral, or developmental
disabilities."



by Jonathan Cruz, Danny Echevarria, & Hisa Hashisaka
A Brief History of Ableism
Disability in Current Times
Intersectionalities of Ableism

Take space, make space
Trust Intent
Seek to understand before understood
“I” statements
Don’t yuck my yum
Safe space, brave space
Respect the silence
Living List
Gain familiarity with language used to discuss
ableism

Examine how we formed our understanding of disability & our relationship to it today

Consider historical and current events pertaining
to disabilities

Become more aware of how disability may impact one's college experience



Workshop Goals
People-First
Language
Throughout this workshop we will be
using the term “people with disabilities”
as opposed to “disabled people.”
Try to utilize this language
during this workshop.
Stereotype Activity
What are some common myths and stereotypes
you have heard of about people
with disabilities?

Physical disability - An impairment which limits physical function of limb(s) or motor ability  

Mental disability - Associated with impairment of "normal" mental functioning

Developmental disability - Lifelong mental or physical impairments manifested at an early age

Behavioral disability – Affects a person's ability to recognize and express emotions and hinders social interaction
report released today on minority representation on broadcast television shows that scripted characters with disabilities will represent only one percent of all scripted series regular characters — six characters out of 587 — on the five broadcast networks: ABC, CBS, The CW, Fox, and NBC. Not only is this invisibility in the media misrepresentative of people with disabilities, it also means few opportunities for actors with disabilities to be cast.
Television:
Glee
Game of Thrones, Tyrion
Breaking Bad, Walter White Jr.
Switched At Birth
How does the media portray people with disabilities?

How do you distinguish what is appropriate to laugh at?
Small Group
Language Activity
Lame
Psycho
Special-Ed
Retarded
Bipolar
OCD
Dumb
Crazy

Disability & the College Experience
Step in / Step out Activity
Small-Group debrief

How did you feel doing this exercise? Did you feel uncomfortable?

When faced with a disability, did you feel disadvantaged?

Are people with disabilities inherently disadvantaged or do "societal norms" disadvantage them?
Final Group Discussion
Come as you are:
How did you feel about attending this workshop when you first heard about it?

Leave as you become:
Has this conversation about disability influenced you at all? Will you be leaving this workshop with new information?
S.E.A.S - Student and Employee Accessibility Services coordinates and facilitates services for Students, Faculty, Staff and Visitors with physical, psychological, and learning disabilities.

20 Benevolent Street
SEAS@brown.edu

Fall courses of interest:
PHP1680: Pathology to Power: Disability, Community, Health
SIGN0100: American Sign Language I, II

Spring:
SIGN0900: Introduction to Deaf Studies
SOC1250: Perceptions of Mental Illness


Ableism
Media Representations of People with Disabilities
Defining Ableism
Able-bodied

Have you ener thought about able-bodies privilege?
Disability & Media
Glee

Paraplegia, OCD, Down-Syndrome, Stutter
Game of Thrones
Dwarfism
Family Guy
Paraplegia
Switched at Birth
Master Chef
Deafness
Blindness
"Retard Girl" Meme
How does the media portray people with disabilities?

How do you distinguish what is appropriate to laugh at?

Small Group Debrief
Disability & the College Experience
Mental Health Study:
A 2008 study found that half of college-aged people surveyed met criteria for at least one psychiatric disorder in the previous year

Only a quarter of these people sought treatment

Stigma is often a barrier to treatment
South Park
How does television and social media portray people with disabilities?

How do you distinguish what is appropriate to laugh at?
Small- Group
I am able to take part in all Physical Education activities.





I can read printed materials easily.







I need to make special arrangements to leave my house for extended periods of time.








I need to check external conditions such as air quality, weather, and pollen count to safely leave the house.






I have to consider my route when entering a building.







I need to take prescription medication on a regular basis.






I need extra time on tests.






I cannot hear what my professor is saying without aid.






I am able to easily complete oral presentations.






There are many negative stereotypes of my disability.








Take a deep breath.







When I learned about history in school, people of my ability were well represented.







I need someone to take notes for me during lectures because it is difficult for me to do so.







I need an interpreter for any verbal presentations given.







My education might be interrupted by visits to the doctor because of my disability.








In order to communicate with a professor or tutor, I am limited to a word processor or email.







When I swear, dress sloppily, or am in a bad mood people may attribute it to my disability.






I have had to spend money on technology and services because of my disability.







I have to worry about the ingredients in the foods that I eat.







I can easily understand spoken language










Most people have a good understanding of my disability.
Step-In, Step-Out Activity
Now, for the remainder of this exercise, please disregard the slips of paper you were handed and respond to the following statements based on your own personal experience.












In my ethnicity, race, or culture there is a stigma around seeking psychological or mental help.










In my community people generally cannot afford physical or occupational therapy.










I have a friend or family member with a disability (physical, mental, behavioral, learning, etc.)







I have a disability (physical, mental, behavioral, learning, etc.),







I have felt inconvenienced by policies and procedures used to give fair access to those with disabilities.







I have wondered about the fairness of giving people extra time on tests.








A person’s ability impacts my willingness to date them.







I would consider someone’s ability when entering an intimate relationship with them.








My abilities or those of my partner have or will affect my decision to have children.







Please take a deep breath.








Sometimes I feel uncomfortable around people with disabilities.








A friend’s disability affects the way I hang out with them.







I have made fun of someone that I perceived as disabled.






I have used the word “retarded” as an insult.







During this step in/step out activity, I am physically able to step in and step out.








At some point, I could have stepped in, but did not.



How did you feel doing this exercise? Did any questions make you feel uncomfortable?

Did this activity raise any questions? Why?


Small-Group Debrief
Intersections

How did you feel coming into this workshop?


What will you take away from this workshop into the future?
Closing Remarks
Cerebral Palsy Stuttering Tourette's
Resources
Construction
Steep Streets
Broken Sidewalks
Curb Cuts Blocked
Where did you first learn about disability?

As an adult, how have your impressions of disability changed?

What do you consider a disability?

Personal Roots Questions
1883: Essays in Eugenics
Encouraged institutionalization & forced sterilization
1950: Social Security expanded for people with disabilities
1960's: De-institutionalization Movement
1973: Rehabilitation Act
Prohibited discrimination in federally-funded programs, public schools
1990: Americans With Disabilities Act
Equal-access to employment
Public spaces made more accessible
Interpretation services for the hard-of-hearing
2004: 1st Annual Disability Pride Parade in Chicago
Present Challenges:
Educational barriers provide significant challenges for children with disabilities

People with disabilities 4 times more likely to be jailed than in psychiatric hospitals

Timeline
Mental Health @ Brown
Campus Accessibility:
Disability in the College Experience
Accessibility @ Brown
I have used the word “retarded”
as an insult.







I have made fun of someone that I perceived as disabled.







I have wondered about the fairness of giving people extra time on tests.







When I learned about history in school, people with disabilities were represented.







Sometimes I feel uncomfortable around people with disabilities.







I have felt inconvenienced by policies and procedures used to accommodate those with disabilities.







I considered my route when entering this building.








A person’s ability would impact my willingness to date them.







I would consider someone’s ability when entering an intimate relationship with them.







I have been physically attracted to a person with a visible disability.








Please take a deep breath.







I have a friend or family member with a disability (physical, mental, behavioral, learning, etc.)








I have a disability
(physical, mental, behavioral, learning, etc.)







People do not believe me when I tell them I have a disability.







My gender has affected how my disability is perceived.







I have had to spend money on technology or services because of my disability.







People do not have a good understanding of my disability.








I think that people of my ethnicity, race, or culture are disproportionately affected by disability.







In my ethnicity, race, or culture there is a stigma around seeking psychological or mental help.







In my community people generally cannot afford physical or occupational rehabilitation.











A family member or friend’s disability affects the way I hang out with them.












During this step in/step out activity, I am physically able to step in and step out.









At some point during this activity I could have stepped in, but did not.

Thank you. Please take your seats.
Step In/Out
Move In/Out
Able-bodied Privilege
Have you ever considered that being
"able-bodied" privileges a person?
Come as you are...
Leave as you become!
THANK YOU!

1883
1940s

1963
1975
1990
The College Experience
Mental Health & Campus Accessibility
What are your thoughts about mental health in college? Did the study results surprise you?

What do you think about accessibility at Brown?
Disability & Sex:
Disability & Race:
Disability & Class:
Disability & Sexual Orientation:
Stereotype Activity
Internet Culture
Full transcript