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STAAR Crossover Short Answer

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by

Sarah Gadsby

on 11 December 2015

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Transcript of STAAR Crossover Short Answer

Step 4: TRANSITION!
Steps 5-6: Evidence #2
Short Answer Responses
The Lion King and Finding Nemo both contain the central theme: sometimes we feel guilty for hurting those we care about.
In the Lion King, Simba states, “You said you'd always be there for me! But you're not. And it's because of me. It's my fault. It's my fault,” (p. 42). He says this because even though his father died a long time ago, he still feels guilty, knowing that his father dies trying to rescue him.
Similarly,
in Finding Nemo, Marlin, Nemo’s father, says, “Nemo, see he was mad at me. And maybe he wouldn't have done it if I hadn't been so tough on him, I don't know, but now he’s gone,” (p. 63). One of the reasons that Nemo’s dad is so desperate to find him is because he feels guilty about the way he treated his son.
Both Simba and Marlin feel guilty for putting their loved one in harm’s way.
On crossover short answers, you will need to answer a question about
two separate works of literature
and discuss how they are
linked
. This means you will have to write about how the two works are
similar
.
Step 1
1. Answer the prompt
and include the titles of
both
works.
Step 7
How do I answer
crossover questions?

What components do I need?!
Steps 2-3: Evidence #1
2. Back up your answer
with evidence from the
FIRST
work.
3. Comment
on how the evidence from the
first
work connects back to your answer.
5. Back up your answer
with evidence from the
SECOND
work.
6. Comment
on how the evidence from the
second
work connects back to your answer.
4. You will need
a transition word or statement
that will
lead into
your reference of the second work.
Now...
Let's look at an example!
The ABCs of SARs
Step 1: ANSWER the prompt
1. Answer what is being asked in an
intellectual
tone.
Step 2: BACK it up with evidence
Example of Dropped Quote:
"i'm sure you wouldn't mind if i took a pair of tweezers and i tweezered
your
behind!
"
Step 3: COMMENT and connect your evidence back to the prompt.
Dropped Quotes are simply using the entire quote.
After being bitten, the narrator of the poem is
annoyed
with the mosquito and lashes back at him saying, "I'm sure you wouldn't mind if I took a pair of tweezers and I tweezered
your
behind!"
Example of an embedded quote:
Example Prompt:
How does the author use language to reveal what the community is like in "The Giver"?

Answer:
In

Lois Lowry's


novel
, "
The Giver
,"
Lowry
uses
plain and direct
language
to
reveal
the
lifeless
atmosphere of The Community and the
controlling nature
of The Community's Elders.
3. Use the
author's name
and the
name of the piece
when possible.
1. Write a 1-2 sentence explanation of how the quote you selected connects to the prompt.

2.
Transition
from your quote to your comment about the quote.
"This quote reveals...
"From the text we can tell...
"This line indicates...
"The author's words show the reader...
1. Select the
MOST CONVINCING
evidence to support your answer.

2. Don't
"quote drop."
Instead,
embed
your evidence by
introducing
the quote, using the
author's last name
and a
marker verb
.

3.
Explain
your quote by combining the quote with
some of your own words
.
2. Use strong
L2 associative words
to describe the topic.
In [
author's name
]'s [
text type
] "[
title
]", [
author's last name
] uses [
tool or literary device
] to [
marker verb
] [
L2 word
] and [
L2 word
].
Use L2 words as...

an adjective:
"an
L2
[noun]"
"a
lifeless
atmosphere"

a noun:
"a sense (or feeling) of
L2
"
"a sense of
control
"
or "a feeling of
control
"
Introduce
your quote:
"In [
line/paragraph #
], [
author's name
] [
marker verb
], "
textual evidence
"
Explain
your quote:
"[
Author's name
] is trying to [
marker verb
] a sense of [
L2
] by using words such as [
word from text
] and [
word from text
].
Marker Verbs:
claims
states
refers
mentions
reveals...
Prompt:
How are the themes of "The Lion King" and "Finding Nemo" similar?
Crossover SARs are JUST like single-text SARs, but...
7.
Conclude
with a statement re-explaining how your two works
relate
to one another.
Crossover SARs
There are 7 steps to writing a Crossover SAR. Here is the breakdown:
Describe the author's attitude towards mosquitoes in the poem, "Mosquito".
Single-selection Prompt:
Answer:
In the poem, "Mosquito," J. Patrick Lewis'
attitude
towards mosquitoes is
infuriated.
The author's
imaginative
story shows the reader that he finds mosquitoes
frustrating
to deal with, and that he would not have any problems smacking one that bit him!
In the poem, "Mosquito," J. Patrick Lewis'
attitude
towards mosquitoes is
infuriated.
After being bitten, the narrator of the poem is
annoyed
with the mosquito and lashes back at him saying, "I'm sure you wouldn't mind if I took a pair of tweezers and I tweezered
your
behind!"
The author's
imaginative
story shows the reader that he finds mosquitoes
frustrating
to deal with, and that he would not have any problems smacking one that bit him!
Comment & Connect
A
B
C
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