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Game

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by

Courtney Bell

on 7 November 2014

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Transcript of Game

Group 3
Rebecca, Sasha, Jennifer, Courtney,
Introduction:
(Key Terms)
How Do You Get To The Doctor?

Game
Population of 232,090
There are several transportation options available for those with physical disabilities within the city of Regina.
These services are:
Paratranist
Wheelchair Assessable Cabs
Low-Floor Public Buses
Renting/modifying cars (MediChair, taxi's)
Urban Center: Regina Saskatchewan
How Do You Get To The Doctor?
Without the use of your arms?
How Do You Get To The Doctor?

Without the use of your legs?
Transportation Services = Feet, Walkers, Wheel Chairs, Bikes, Automobiles, Busses, Planes, Trains, Boats, etc.
Mobility Affecting Disabilities = A physical or mental disability that impairs one’s ability to get around. Loss of limb, loss of the use of limb(s), multiple sclerosis, severe autism, visual impairment, etc.
Rural Communities = Red Earth FN: Population 1100, Shoal Lake FN: Population 631, Pilot Butte: Population 1850
Urban Community = Regina: Population 232,090 (Regina Leader Post, 2014)
A form of public transportation that is run by the city of Regina. It was designed specifically for individuals residing in Regina and living with a disability.
Those with neurological, mobility related, or sensory related disabilities are permitted to use this service.
Paratranist may be booked for trips to work, school, medical appointments or recreational activities.
Using Paratransit
First introduced in 1998 as a way for those with limited mobility to access public transit. (City of Regina, 2014)
These buses literally lower to the ground to allow for easy access to the bus.
The low floor buses provide easy access for anyone with a mobility device, scooter, stroller and more.
Currently the city of Regina boosts that it is “ 100% low floor accessible." (City of Regina, 2014)
Still not a fully accessible service (those with complex mobility issues may have a hard time using this transit service)

Service users can book for one-way or two-way trips.
Service users can book their trip via email or by phoning the booking agent.
Bookings can be made Monday to Friday 9:00 a.m. -8:00 p.m. or Friday 9:00 a.m. -6:00 p.m.
It is recommended that users book seven days in advance (City of Regina, 2014)
Also offer two accessible Taxis
Car modifications (Medichair)
Prices vary depending on modifications to the vehicle.
“3.8 million people, or 13.7% of Canadians aged 15 and older, reported being limited in their daily activities because of a disability... 26.0% [classified themselves] as very severe; 22.5%, severe; 19.8%, moderate; and 31.7%, mild." (Statistics Canada, 2013)
Regina Paratransit
A form of public transportation
designed specifically for individuals residing in Regina and living with a disability.
Paratranist may be booked for trips to work, school, medical appointments or recreational activities. (City of Regina, 2014)
By having a system such as Paratransit, the City of Regina is meeting the Article 9 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.
Rural Setting: Shoal Lake First Nation
Three Transportation Services:
Taxi Service which comes from Red Earth.
Ambulance from Carrot River and Nipawin,
Police Services from Red Earth.
Rural Setting: Red Earth, First Nation
Taxi,
Ambulance from Carrot River or Nipawin,
Police Station

Canada's Stance Providing Transportation For Those With Disabilities
Article 9 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities:
“To enable persons with disabilities to live independently and participate fully in all aspects of life, States Parties shall take appropriate measures to ensure to persons with disabilities access, on an equal basis with others, to the physical environment, to transportation, to information and communications, including information and communications technologies and systems, and to other facilities and services open or provided to the public, both in urban and in rural areas. These measures, which shall include the identification and elimination of obstacles and barriers to accessibility,

(United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, 2006)
In order to get on to the paratransit bus, service users must must pay in exact cash (at the time of pickup), or swipe their reloadable “R Card”
The cost of paratranist in the city is the same as a bus ride of the regular transit services offered in Regina.
The driver will pick the service user up from a specific point of origin, and drop them off in a specific place. (City of Regina, 2014)
Booking Paratransit
How Do You Get To The Doctor?
Without the use of your eyes?
A Comparison of Rural Communities to Urban Communities
Regarding Transportation for Those with Reduced Mobility

CASW and Transportation For Those With Disabilities
Regina Paratranist
Low-Floor Buses
Background Information
Other Transportation Services
Pilot Butte
Reference List
Why is Transportation Important?
“Transportation enables community participation, a sense of belonging, and access to all the benefits of citizenship.” (The Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission, 2013)
Run by City of Regina.
CHARTER RATE CHARGE
charter rate is $60.30/hour.
There will also be an additional charge for trips outside the city limits of $0.39/kilometre.
Rural Transportation for Those With Disabilities

Communities surrounding Regina
Pilot Butte - 17.4km - 18min
White City - 17.7km - 16min
Grand Coulee-18.2km - 19min
Zehner - 23.5km - 36min
Pense - 34.9km - 26min
Rouleau - 74.1km - 49min

Rural Transportation for Those With Disabilities

Taxi fares to Pilot Butte, especially with regards to Taxis that are wheelchair accessible, would cost significantly more than the bus system.
Rural Transportation for Those With Disabilities

When you consider the cost weekly, monthly or yearly to those with disabilities in small communities surrounding larger centres, the cost becomes insurmountable.

So how do people in small communities that surround urban centres and, thus, have very low economic structures of their own manage with a disability?


Rural Transportation for Those With Disabilities

Hoogsteen and Woodgate (2013) claim that there are advantages and disadvantages in managing disabilities (in the study, specifically Autism) in Canadian rural communities.
Disadvantages include having less access to professional and structured supports.
The advantage was that everyone in a rural community knows each other to provide more personal support (Hoogsten & Woodgate, 2013).

Rural Transportation for Those With Disabilities

Interview with Karen Byrd, Assistant Administrator of the Town of Pilot Butte

Q: Do the people of Pilot Butte with mobility issues get subsidized for the extra cost to get Paratransit to service the town or do you have a contract with them at all to provide services?

A: Well we certainly don’t have a contract or anything as a town. I have never seen Paratransit or taxis for people with mobility issues being used in our town.

Interview:

Q: Then how does the Town of Pilot Butte deal with meeting the transportation needs of people with mobility issues?
A: There are really three ways that I can think of:

1. Country Lane Care Home owners.
2. School has an Inclusive Learning Program (ILP) and transports children with differing abilities to the school daily. They may provide services at certain times of the day if requested.
3. Neighbours in our community help each other.


Interview:
Examples of Community Support:

“Last year’s Fire”

“Your Mom’s Garage Door is Open”

“Clayton”

Rural Transportation for Those With Disabilities

Q: How do you identify when there is someone in the town that has a need for the community to fill?

Q: With the population of the town being very transitional, how do you continue to maintain a close sense of community for support?

A: We talk to the people who are new to the town. As a town, we supply welcome baskets to new people who arrive and sit and visit with them. Everyone goes to the Post Office or the Town Office sooner or later and we make ourselves accessible.

Interview:

Q: Has there been any talk or rumours of ways to make transportation to Regina’s services easier, specifically for people with disabilities?

A: As long as I have been here (>30years), there has been talk about creating some sort of shuttle system, either by bus or by train, but to make it cost effective to run, it would be best to incorporate our neighbouring communities. By doing that we run into problems with how much time it would take for the people from the first community picked up to get where they are going. We are also all independent communities with unique needs and it would take some sort of transportation committee to have everyone on the same page.

Interview:

A: Since we have lost the generosity of the previous care home owners, we have considered buying a wheelchair accessible van and having it run by volunteers. We have a great resource of volunteers in this community through the Lions Club, the Volunteer Fire Department, and other community members.

Interview:

Community framework is built
Around individual needs

Individual need is placed within
an already existing framework

Rural System

Urban System

Rural Transportation for Those With Disabilities




Canadian Survey on Disability, 2012. (2013, December 3). Retrieved November 6, 2014, from http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/131203/dq131203a-eng.htm

Canadian Survey on Disability, 2012. (2013, December 3). Retrieved November 6, 2014, from http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/131203/dq131203a-eng.htm
City of Regina. (n.d.). Regina Paratransit (RPS). Retrieved November 6, 2014, from https://www.regina.ca/residents/transit-services/regina-paratransit/

City of Regina. (n.d.). Regina Paratransit (RPS). Retrieved November 6, 2014, from https://www.regina.ca/residents/transit-services/regina-paratransit/

Code of Ethics 2005. Ottawa: CASW, 2005. Print

Gove, P., & Webster, I. (1993). Transportation. In Webster's third new international dictionary of the English language, unabridged. Springfield, Mass.: Merriam-Webster.

Government of Saskatchewan. (2013, January 1). Social Services - Government of Saskatchewan. Retrieved November 7, 2014, from http://www.socialservices.gov.sk.ca/

Hoogsteen, L., & Woodgate, R. L. (2013). Embracing autism in Canadian rural communities.
Australian Journal of Rural Health, 21(3), 178-182.

The Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission. (2013). Achieving equivalent, comparable, and accessible public transportation in the city of Regina a report to stakeholders. Saskatoon, Sask.: Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission.
Disability, disabilities, convention, UN, rights, accessibility. (2006, January 1). Retrieved November 6, 2014, from http://www.un.org/disabilities/convention/conventionfull.shtml

Saskatchewan Voice of People with Disabilities Inc. (2014, January 1). Saskatchewan Voice of People with Disabilities Inc. Retrieved November 6, 2014, from http://saskvoice.com/

SASW. (2012). Standards of practice for registered Social Workers in Saskatchewan. Regina,
SK: SASW.

One way trip from Pilot Butte to appointment in Regina

17.4km 34.8km
x 2
x $0.39
=34.8km = $13.57

This would just be the cost of having the Paratransit bus leave Regina to Pilot Butte, pick up the client, and take them to Regina. This cost would be doubled to return to Pilot Butte.

Rural Transportation for Those With Disabilities
• Social workers respect the diversity among individuals in Canadian
society and the right of individuals to their unique beliefs consistent
with the rights of others." (CASW, 2005)

CASW and Transportation For Those With Disabilities

As a result the theme of Dignity and Worth is most important when creating any disability policy and that inaccessibility to transportation for those with a disability can strip them of dignity and make those in rural areas feel even more isolated than they already are.
Value 1 of the CASW Code of Ethics which is Respect for the Inherent Dignity and Worth of Persons.
"Social workers respect the unique worth and inherent dignity of all people and uphold human rights.
http://vipmedia.globalnews.ca/2013/04/yqr-paratransit.jpg?w=336&h=224&crop=1
leaderpost.com
Full transcript