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Japan Culture Project

ESL 577 project by Kate Morgan, Morgan Petronis, Shannan Smith and Lori Ziminski
by

Kate Morgan

on 21 April 2014

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Transcript of Japan Culture Project

Japan: the country and its people:
Historical Overview
Family and Cultural Beliefs:

-“Saving face” is important in Japanese society.

-very conscious of age and status.

- emphasis on working together for the group, rather than the individual.

- disrespectful to stare into another person's eyes, particularly those of a person who is senior to you in age or status.

- rich history of fine and performing arts traditions
Education in Japan:
Same number of years as American students
School year starts April 1. Consists of 3 terms with short breaks in between. Ends in March and students move onto next grade.
240 school days per year adds up to 720 more days than American students over same 12 year period
Student population: uniform culture
Class size 35-40 student per class with one teacher teaching all subjects in elementary
Graduation statistics:
100% complete elementary, 90% high school, 40% university or junior college
Japanese Culture Project
by:
Kate Morgan
Morgan Petronis
Shannan Smith
Lori Ziminski

A typical student in Japan:
What teachers of Japanese students should know:
Japan: the country and its people:
How teachers can help Japanese ELLs:
English sounds and pronunciation
phonetic differences
English rhythm and cadence
English grammar
Reading, Writing, Vocabulary
10,000 B.C.: Prehistoric Japan
Mid 1500's: Increased Contact with Europeans
1600-1800's: Shogunate policy of National Seclusion
1852-1854: Perry's Expedition "The American Invasion"
1854: Mutual recognition -Japan and USA
1941: Japanese / American Relations Suspended
1952: Japanese / American Relations Resumed
Constitutional Monarchy
Emperor: Akihito
Prime Minister: Head of Government
Parliament
Current dominant Party: the Liberal Democratic Party
3.5% GDP spent on Education
Political Overview
Japan: the country and its people
The Land
Total Population~127,368,088
Rugged, Mountainous Terrain
Slightly Smaller than California
4 Main Islands- Honshu
Arable Land: ~11%
Pollution: Air Pollution, Acid Rain
36.5
11.3
2.8
Japan: the country and its people
The People
teamwork
Japanese students' language strengths
student work ethic
eye contact
Ethnicity: 98.5% Japanese
Religion: Shintoism 83.9%, Buddhism 71.4%
Literacy: 99%
Life Expectancy: 83 years
School-Life Expectancy: 15 years
Unemployment: 9.1%
Poverty: 16 % below poverty line
Industrialization: 67% urban population
(Koreans 0.5%, Chinese 0.4%, other 0.6%)

References:

Culture of Japan
http://www.everyculture.com/Ja-Ma/Japan.html
Educational Systems of Japan
http://www.bookmice.net/darkchilde/japan/educ.html
Education in Japan
http://www.education-in-japan.info/sub1.html
Government of Japan
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Government_of_Japan
History of Japan
http://web-japan.org/museum/historyofjp/histjp.html
How do Japan's Students Do It? They Cram http://www.nytimes.com/1992/04/27/world/how-do-japan-s-students-do-it-they-cram.html?pagewanted=all&src=pm
Japanese education system
http://www.japan-guide.com/e/e2150.html
JAPANESE VIEWS OF THE U.S.: A SPECIAL RELATIONSHIP AND THE DIFFERENCE OF MEMORIES
http://uscpublicdiplomacy.org/index.php/newswire/cpdblog_detail/japanese_views_of_the_us_a_special_relationship_and_the_difference_of_/
Kids Web Japan
http://web-japan.org/kidsweb/explore/schools/index.html
Stanford Program on International and Cross-Cultural Education http://spice.stanford.edu/docs/142
Teaching English to Japanese students
http://humanities.byu.edu/elc/teacher/japanesestudents.html
The World Factbook
https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/rankorder/2119rank.html?countryName=Japan&countryCode=ja&regionCode=eas&rank=10#ja

Elementary students only have classes in the morning
Middle/high school students have 5 or 6 classes daily
Lunch is provided in public schools
Recess may be used for cleaning the classroom
Extracurricular activities play a large part
one day a week for elementary
multiple days (maybe every day) for middle/high
The National Curriculum
All schools in Japan follow same guidelines.
Revised every 10 years or so.
Elementary curriculum includes:
Japanese, social studies, math, science, music, arts and handicrafts, homemaking and physical education
Emphasis on music, fine arts, and physical education
Middle school curriculum includes:
Japanese, math, social studies, science, English, music, art, physical education, field trips, clubs, and homeroom time
"Specials" emerge and teachers don't teach all subjects
High Schools
Types:
Elite academic high schools
Non-elite academic high schools
Vocational high schools
Correspondence high schools
Entrance exams
Different curricula to meet student needs
Traditional Interests
Art
Art of the Samurai, metalwork, netsuke, sagemono, lacquer, painting, ceramic, and sculpture. 
Anime and Manga
Takashi Murakami. His work focuses on Japanese society in the post-war period.
Nature
Enjoyment of nature, especially flowers is important to the Japanese culture. (castles, temples, shrines and formal gardens)
Cherry Blossom (Sakura)
Bonsai
Flower arranging
Typical Japanese gardens contain:Water, an island , a bridge to the island, a lantern, a teahouse or pavilion
Tea Ceremony

Sports
Kendo, Judo, Aikido
Sumo
Food
Traditional Japanese Cuisine is an important element of their cultural identity
White rice, soy products, raw or grilled seafood does not rely on intense seasonings, but rather contrast in tastes and textures
many small dishes instead of large main course
presentation important
Since World War II, consumption of dairy products, beef, bread, and other Western foods has increased dramatically.
Clothing
Traditional
Kimono


Modern
Mostly "western style"
Kimono still worn, but mostly for ceremonies and festivals
Full transcript