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portfolio

interior
by

anjum fahad

on 14 March 2013

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Transcript of portfolio

TRY LIVING IN ONE. HANG WASHING OUT TO DRY
AND BREAK ITS CLEAN LINES WITH YOUR BUDS AND SMALLS.
SPRAY TRIBAL NAMES ACROSS ITS SUBWAY WALLS
AND CRACK ITS FLAGSTONES SO THE WEEDS CAN TRY


THEIR DAMNEDEST. THAT'S THE WAY. FLY-TIP THE LIVES
YOU LED, OUT PAST ITS EDGE, ON THE BACK FIELD;
SIDEBOARDS ANS MANGLES MADE SENSE IN THE PEELED
SPUD LIGHT OF THE OLD HOUSE BUT THE KNIVES


ARE OUT FOR THEM NOW. THIS CELLARLESS,UN ATTICKED
PLACE WILL SHAKE THE RENTMAN OFF, WILL THROW
OPEN ITS ARMS AND WELCOME THE WHITE AROW
DELIVERY FLEET WHICH BRINGS THE THINGS ON TICK


FROM THE SLUSH PILES OF THE SEASONAL CATALOGUES.
THE QUILT BOXES WILL TAKE UP RESIDENCE
ON THE TOPS OF WHITE WARDROBES, AN AMBULANCE
RAISE BLINDS, A WHOLE GEOGRAPHY OF DOGS


WILL MAKE THEIR PRESENCE FELT. AND ONCE A YEAR
ON LE CORBUSIER'S BIRTHDAY, THE SUN WILL SET
BANG ON THE PRE-ORDAINED EXACT SPOT
AND THAT IS WHY WE PUT THAT SLAB JUST THERE.


ONE BY ONE THE SHOPKEEPERS WILL SHUT
THEIR DOORS FOR GOOD. A NEWSAGENT WILL DROW
THE LINES AT BUTTERED STEPS. THE FINAL STRAW
WIL FILL THE FIELDS BEYOND. NOW LIVE IN IT. URBAN URBAN ENVIRONMENT URBAN GRAFFITI URBAN LIVING URBAN CULTURE URBAN ARCHITECTURE URBAN FASHION STYLE URBAN GRAPHICS URBAN DESIGNS PRIMARY RESEARCH ON URBAN THEME Haider Ali, is Pakistan's finest Truck Artist. He's even had his work displayed at the Smithsonian Museum, USA under the Silkroad Folk Festival. He started his work when he was just 12, working alongside his father after school. 14 years laters, he's amongst those who're changing the face of this art. This picture was taken in 'Golimar', Karachi. Haider Ali's own workshop is in Garden East. Painted Truck
Jamil-ud-Din and Haider Ali demonstrated the art of truck painting on the National Mall during the 2002 Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

"Jamil-ud-Din and Haider Ali often walk among the throngs, savoring the spectacle. Their South Asian features inevitably lead someone to ask, "Did you make this?" The men respond with a smile, followed sometimes by the word "yes," sometimes by only a nod. Because the pair speak little English—and Urdu-speaking Washingtonians are few and far between—that is usually the extent of the conversation. But for Jamil and Haider, saying anything at all to Americans—and seeing their work displayed between the U.S. Capitol and the Washington Monument—is something that they never imagined possible. Picked by the Smithsonian Institution as the best in their trade, the two are in the middle of a surreal experience that they hope will help improve relations between the United States and Pakistan."
— Michael Vasquez, Washington Post, July 6, 2002. Pakistan’s culture and society have been significantly influenced by diverse ethnic groups living in the country. Punjabis, Kashmiris, Sindhis, Balochis, Siraikis, Pakhtuns and Muhajirs have all contributed to our cultural heritage and art over many decades. The art in Pakistan has also been greatly influenced by various regions in the neighbourhood. Notable influences include the Persian Empire along with the Afghan and Mughal Empire. The colonial regime, more popularly known as British Raj also influenced the forms of fine arts in the country.However, over the decades and various influences, one thing which still remains consistent in Pakistani art is vibrant colours. Bright colours have always been the major attraction and hence, it is no surprise that local crafts and clothing all consist of a wide spectrum of colours.Over the years, ethnic art and crafts have gained popularity on such a large scale that these symbols of trucks have now moved onto objects and clothes. The cultural art with time has not lost its true essence. However, it has matured and popularized worldwide, making it a good business strategy for a lot of common people.Having been spread at such a vast perimeter, the skills of our local people are being put to use in mass production bringing a boost in employment and appreciation. This gallery comprises hand painted items by artist Bina Ali and Anjum Rana. Over the years, ethnic art and crafts have gained popularity on such a large scale that these symbols of trucks have now moved onto objects and clothes. With vibrant floral patterns and swirl motifs intricately laid, script of poetic verses and driver’s words of wisdom have truly made a place in Pakistani native culture. Just like the truck art in Pakistan, there is another indigenous form of art which is ‘Billboard painting.’ Presently this is commonly seen on wooden planks used as wall hangings and even casual t-shirts in the market. Michele Field bus art canal boat art CONTEXTUAL RESEARCH One of the most attractive features of canals is the shining paintwork and colorful decoration of the boats. The 'Roses & Castles' decorations and distinctive sign writing traditions survive today, on a wide range of modern and traditional narrow boats. shield maiden canal boat painter I live in the Black Country where we have more canals than in Venice . Near to my home is the Dudley No 2 canal which has the prettiest stretch of canal in the region. I first became interested in narrow boat decoration when I moved to this area and developed a passion for the canals.
One day I saw a “Roses and Castles” painting course advertised and thought I’d have a go. Which led to several more courses and many hours of practice with the “Waterways Craft Guild” and the creation of my company “Canal Art by Julie”. ’m qualified with the Waterways Craft Guild as a “Journeyman in Decorative Art” and decorate boats and items of canal ware with roses, castles, scrolls, stars and sign-writing as well as teaching canal art as a college subject and I also go into schools and have students in groups or individuals in my workshop. Over the years I have become a well established Oxford shire artist.
The subjects I most enjoy painting are Canals, Waterways, Woodlands, Landscapes and I also have a passion to paint large vibrant floral canvases. These are such fun to paint, it's just nice to get carried away and express yourself with bright vibrant colorss. Acrylics are such lovely mediums to work with. Julie Reflective work These are a few patterns which I explored from my contextual research and I explored it in my sketch book Illustrating MY WORK Glass work Textile work Ceramics work URBAN BRUTALISTS HAIDER ALI JAMIL-UD- DIN BINA ALI AND ANJUM RANA Navin Rawanchaikul

Shakespeare in Taxi
01 June 2000 – 01 June 2001
Navin Rawanchaikul’s Shakespeare in Taxi began with hours of informal conversations between the artist and cab drivers about their experiences of working in Birmingham. These discussions formed the raw material for a comic book distributed freely from the backseats of city taxis. The illustrated story featured a taxi driver from the West Midlands who conjures up an imaginary friendship with William Shakespeare to assist him in the search for love. In the same vein, Rawanchaikul had the bodywork of a second-hand cab transformed into a huge comic strip, depicting many of the individuals he met in Birmingham.


Navin Rawanchaikul.
Shakespeare in Taxi Navin Rawanchaikul (born 1971) Thai: นาวิน ลาวัลย์ชัยกุล is a Thai artist with Japanese permanent resident status whose ancestral roots are in Hindu-Punjabi communities of what is now Pakistan. He has developed a unique and vast body of works that rely heavily on team spirit and collaboration, and are most often produced under the auspices of Navin Production Co., Ltd. His artistic development began with works rooted in his local community of Chiang Mai. As he embarked on more and more international presentations of his work he started to engage in a process of exploring the negotiation between local circumstances and trends of globalisation. RAZZAL DAZZAL PAINTING Painting of Dazzle-ships in Drydock at Liverpool, by Edward Wadsworth, 1919 Dazzle camouflage, also known as razzle dazzle or dazzle painting, was a family of ship camouflage used extensively in World War I and to a lesser extent in World War II. Credited to artist Norman Wilkinson, it consisted of complex patterns of geometric shapes in contrasting colours, interrupting and intersecting each other.

Unlike some other forms of camouflage, dazzle works not by offering concealment but by making it difficult to estimate a target's range, speed and heading. Norman Wilkinson explained in 1919 that dazzle was intended more to mislead the enemy as to the correct position to take up than actually to miss his shot when firing.

Dazzle was adopted by the British Admiralty and the U.S. Navy with little evaluation. Each ship's dazzle pattern was unique to avoid making classes of ships instantly recognisable to the enemy. The result was that a profusion of dazzle schemes was tried, and the evidence for their success was at best mixed. So many factors were involved that it was impossible to determine which were important, and whether any of the colour schemes were effective. TOBIAS REHBERGER
Rehberger calls his cafeteria “Was du liebst, bringt dich auch zum Weinen” (Whatever you love, will bring you to wines). It is a crazy, retro-inspired space, juxtaposed with a jumble of forms and colours with black and white as the combining theme. He collaborated with the Finnish furniture house Artek that created custom furniture for the space Tobias Rehberger won the best artist Golden Lion this summer at the 53rd International Art Exhibition of the Venice Biennale. SIMON AND TOM BLOOR Simon & Tom Bloor have worked together since 2003. Using a range of media they explore aspects of architecture, design and popular culture, especially in the light of obscure histories and flawed idealism. For this project the Bloors adopt geodesic design, a method of construction popularised in the 1950s by visionary thinker Buckminster Fuller, as a fast and efficient – if imperfect – way of creating any curved, enclosed space.



Their geodesic canopy for a working canal boat provides shelter for visitors who can travel along Birmingham’s historic waterways while browsing an onboard library of utopian design. In reference to another remarkable moment of design history, the artists have painted the exterior of the canopy with their interpretation of dazzle camouflage, a type of graphic patterning devised by war artists for naval ships as a means of confusing the enemy. Known as ‘Razzle Dazzle’ during the First World War its success was limited, 3D work SALON INTERIOR batik screen printing
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