Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Exam Techniques

This presentation is designed for workshop use - the information is available in a booklet in myBU. The information is best viewed full-screen. Use the arrow button to advance the presentation.
by

Tamsyn Smith

on 19 September 2012

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Exam Techniques

Exam
Techniques What will we cover today? The night before your exams Hour before the exam In the exam room Tackling questions Planning answers Panic! After the exam Why take exams? Different types
of exams Exam myths Failure would ruin your life The exam could expose you Exams will show up gaps in your education You should have read everything If you haven't understood everything it isn't worth doing Exams are for people with good memories Exam papers are unreadable Exams are for speed merchants You have to revise until you drop What Examiners
don't want to take marks away you to write everything you know poor structure and answers
written in note form your unsubstantiated opinions A catalogue of examples illegible handwriting and poor presentation colloquial expressions/slang Allow time for How would you allocate your time if you had to answer two essay questions in a 2 hour exam Top Tips Sit close to the front if possible. Avoid sitting by people who you know have irritating habits, if possible Put your hand up before your run out of paper Stop writing at the end of the time you have allocated to a question Start all questions - two-thirds rule Don't cross through your plans Begin with the question that you find the easiest Don't write personal notes to the examiner When you've left the room, don't discuss your answers with anyone If you panic, stop writing, sit quietly and take some deep breaths. Have you considered all aspects of the exam? The day before the exam Details Be Prepared Final revision Good luck The day of the exam During the exam 1 2 1 2 3 4 Reading: 5 minutes
Planning: 20 minutes
Writing: 45 minutes x 2
Proofreading: 5 minutes What Examiners want you to answer the right number of questions you to answer all parts of a question ATQS Amswer the question set To give you marks Overly complex sentences P.E.E. Point. Example/Evidence. Explanation/Expand. you to demonstrate what you understand Some commentators have recently suggested that racism is increasing in British Society. Using examples, discuss this proposition. Is the rapid development of new 'high-tech' shopping centres a bad thing? Discuss in the light of Carl Gardner's article. The UK floods of 2007 were primarily a result of ineffective government policy. Discuss. Has the use of target costing in the car industry contributed to its collapse? Tennis racquets originally had wooden frames with strung sheep gut. Describe the requirements of materials for the frame and the strings for the current racquets. Suggest two alternatives for each section. Justify your choices, paying attention to cost, manufacture and the environment. A.T.Q.S. Answer the question that has been set Pay careful attention to the wording Check that you fully understand the meaning of key procedure words Key procedure words 1/3 Discuss Prove Relate Analyse Show Define Contrast State Justify Consider something by writing about its most important aspects from different points of view. Give arguments for and against, provide supporting evidence, and consider the implications of what you say. Draw a reasoned conclusion based upon the evidence you have presented. Demonstrate something is accurate, true or valid by using facts, evidence, documents and/or other information to build your case in a logical sequence of statements leading from evidence to conclusion. Establish how things are connected or associated in a cause and effect sense. Examine a topic or issue by dividing it into component parts. For each part you should: identify important points and key features; discuss each point and show how they interrelate; form judgements about each part and the whole i.e. strengths and weaknesses, pros and cons, research for and against, causes and effects. Draw a reasoned conclusion based upon the evidence you present. Explain something giving evidence or examples to establish a strong case. Explain the exact meaning of a word or phrase, giving sufficient detail to enable it to be distinguished from other similar words/phrases/ideas. Where relevant show that you understand why the definition may be problematic. Explore the differences between two things. You should probably emphasise points of similarity as well. Express the main points of an idea or topic clearly and concisely. Express valid reasons for accepting a particular interpretation, decision or conclusion, probably including the need to 'argue' a case through consideration of the objections others might make. Key procedure words 2/3 Key procedure words 3/3 Trace Summarise Describe Account for Illustrate Explain Interpret Criticise Compare Outline Assess/
evaluate Enumerate Argue List Identify Comment on Reconcile Review Planning the answer Practise devising plans for past questions Leave the plan visible Don't spend too long on each plan Consider different ways of planning Make 2 or more of your plans before starting to write your answers Allow time for planning, when calculating how much time you have Follow either the causes and effects of something, or the stages in development of something, over a period of time. Give a brief, concise account of the main points of an argument, leaving out superfluous details and side-issues. Give a full account or detailed representation of something. Spell out the main aspects of a topic or idea, or the sequence in which a series of events happened. Give a good explanation of something and evaluate (possible) causes/reasons. Give reasons for or account for something with the addition of examples, statistics or diagrams to provide 'illustrative' examples. Give reasons for or account for something. Similar to 'Describe'. Give the meaning to and explain the relevance of data or other material presented. Give your judgements about the good and/or bad qualities of theories/opinions. Support your decisions with reasons & evidence indicating the criteria on which you base your judgement. Cite specific instances of how the criteria apply in this case. Identify the characteristics or qualities two or more things have in common. You should probably emphasise points of difference as well. Indicate the main features, facts, or general idea of a topic and place in a clear structure or framework to show how they interrelate. Judge the significance, value or importance of something. Pay due attention to positive, negative and disputable aspects, and refer to the special knowledge and judgements of experts as well as your own. Draw a reasoned conclusion based upon the evidence you have presented. List and mention items separately in number order. Make a case, based on appropriate evidence for and / or against something, making sure that your case is logically structured. Mention items separately in order. Pick out what you regard as the key features of something. You should make clear the criteria you use in doing so. Rather vague. Usually means something more than giving your own opinion about something and more likely implies 'analyse' or 'assess'. At the very least, what you say should be supported by reasons and evidence. Show how apparently conflicting ideas or propositions can be seen to be similar in important respects. Involves the need to 'analyse' and 'justify'. Survey a topic and assess it critically. Who are the commentators? What definitions of racism are available? What is the evidence FOR and AGAINST the proposition? What is meant by British Society? Consider something by writing about its most important aspects from different points of view. Give arguments for and against, provide supporting evidence, and consider the implications of what you say. Draw a reasoned conclusion based upon the evidence you have presented. What is meant by rapid? What are ‘high-tech’ shopping centres? What is the evidence FOR and AGAINST the proposition? Who is Carl Gardner? What has he said? Consider something by writing about its most important aspects from different points of view. Give arguments for and against, provide supporting evidence, and consider the implications of what you say. Draw a reasoned conclusion based upon the evidence you have presented. Tennis racquets originally had wooden frames with strung sheep gut. Describe the requirements of materials for the frame and the strings for the current racquets. Suggest two alternatives for each section. Justify your choices, paying attention to cost, manufacture and the environment. Give a full account or detailed representation of something. Spell out the main aspects of a topic or idea, or the sequence in which a series of events happened. Express valid reasons for accepting a particular interpretation, decision or conclusion, probably including the need to 'argue' a case through consideration of the objections others might make. Rapid climate change occurred towards the end of the last (Devensian) glaciation in a phase called the Allerød or Windermere interstadial. Describe these changes (climate, vegetation and fauna) and, giving examples, discuss the consequences for Late Upper Palaeolithic human activity in Britain. The nature and role of the Magistrates Court, Crown Court, County Court and High Court are clearly distinguishable. Select TWO of these courts, explain their nature and role, and distinguish their key features. Outline three research methods used by Biological Psychologists. Discuss the strengths and limitations of each of these methods. Choose a source (known public figure or type of individual) and a product, issue or cause and explain analytically why your chosen source would be appropriate for promoting that product, issue or cause and persuading the target public to buy or take action. Compare and contrast the mechanisms of stability in two joints (either the elbow and knee, or hip and shoulder), describing the functional anatomy as fully as possible. Critically evaluate three different store layout formats detailing the advantages and disadvantages of each of the layout designs chosen. Give sector related examples of their usage highlighting their differing application and characteristics. Benefits to store, staff and shopper should be highlighted. ApSci Business
School DEC MS HSC ST Can you answer these questions now? What SHOULD/ SHOULDN'T you do the night before the exams? How can you spend the hour before the exam? What can you do in the exam room? How should you approach the questions? How can you plan your answers? What can you do if you panic? What should you do at the end of the exam? What do you know about the UK floods of 2007? Where exactly is the question asking about? Why was 2007 a significant year? What is the evidence FOR and AGAINST the proposition? What other reasons for the floods were there? Consider something by writing about its most important aspects from different points of view. Give arguments for and against, provide supporting evidence, and consider the implications of what you say. Draw a reasoned conclusion based upon the evidence you have presented. Which policy/policies are being referred to? Yes or no?
Do you agree? What is target costing? Is it used in the car industry? What else has caused the collapse of the car industry? How serious are problems in the car industry? Is it fair to say there is a collapse in the car industry? Business School The nature and role of the Magistrates Court, Crown Court, County Court and High Court are clearly distinguishable. Select TWO of these courts, explain their nature and role, and distinguish their key features. Explain: Give reasons for or account for something. Similar to 'Describe'. ApSci Rapid climate change occurred towards the end of the last (Devensian) glaciation in a phase called the Allerød or Windermere interstadial. Describe these changes (climate, vegetation and fauna) and, giving examples, discuss the consequences for Late Upper Palaeolithic human activity in Britain. Describe: Give a full account or detailed representation of something. Spell out the main aspects of a topic or idea, or the sequence in which a series of events happened.
Discuss: Consider something by writing about its most important aspects from different points of view. Give arguments for and against, provide supporting evidence, and consider the implications of what you say. Draw a reasoned conclusion based upon the evidence you have presented. MS Choose a source (known public figure or type of individual) and a product, issue or cause and explain analytically why your chosen source would be appropriate for promoting that product, issue or cause and persuading the target public to buy or take action. Explain: Give reasons for or account for something. Similar to 'Describe'.
Analyse: Examine a topic or issue by dividing it into component parts. For each part you should: identify important points and key features; discuss each point and show how they interrelate; form judgements about each part and the whole i.e. strengths and weaknesses, pros and cons, research for and against, causes and effects. Draw a reasoned conclusion based upon the evidence you present. ST Critically evaluate three different store layout formats detailing the advantages and disadvantages of each of the layout designs chosen. Give sector related examples of their usage highlighting their differing application and characteristics. Benefits to store, staff and shopper should be highlighted. Criticise: Give your judgements about the good and/or bad qualities of theories/opinions. Support your decisions with reasons & evidence indicating the criteria on which you base your judgement. Cite specific instances of how the criteria apply in this case.
Evaluate: Judge the significance, value or importance of something. Pay due attention to positive, negative and disputable aspects, and refer to the special knowledge and judgements of experts as well as your own. Draw a reasoned conclusion based upon the evidence you have presented. DEC
Outline three research methods used by Biological Psychologists. Discuss the strengths and limitations of each of these methods. Outline: Indicate the main features, facts, or general idea of a topic and place in a clear structure or framework to show how they interrelate.
Discuss: Consider something by writing about its most important aspects from different points of view. Give arguments for and against, provide supporting evidence, and consider the implications of what you say. Draw a reasoned conclusion based upon the evidence you have presented. HSC Compare and contrast the mechanisms of stability in two joints (either the elbow and knee, or hip and shoulder), describing the functional anatomy as fully as possible. State which pair you have chosen.
Describe how one of then works.
Describe how the other one works.
Discuss in detail the similarities between the two
Discuss the differences
Compare: Identify the characteristics or qualities two or more things have in common. You should probably emphasise points of difference as well.
Contrast: Explore the differences between two things. You should probably emphasise points of similarity as well.
Describe: Give a full account or detailed representation of something. Spell out the main aspects of a topic or idea, or the sequence in which a series of events happened.
Full transcript