Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

And Then There Were None

No description
by

Brooke McCormick

on 13 January 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of And Then There Were None

FONTS
Last 1/3 of project Lit Terms!
Lit Term #4-

An example of an alliteration was found on page 173 paragraph 1 in the book And Then There Were None. The example is, “Five people--five frightened people.” This is an alliteration because the initial consonant sound “f” was repeated three times in the sentence. This use of an alliteration helped me to understand that this sentence was particularly important, as authors use alliterations to draw a reader’s attention in. This alliteration also helped with the the rhythm of reading the story.


Lit Term #2-
An example of imagery was found on page 163 paragraph 4 in the story
And Then There Were None
. The example is, “There was a wet dank smell in her nostrils… On the windowpane the bee was buzzing-- buzzing...And then she felt the prick.” This is imagery because the author uses descriptions that align with the senses (sight,smell, taste,touch, hearing) to make the book more vivid. This example uses smell (“wet dank smell”), hearing (“the bee was buzzing”) and feeling (“felt the prick”) to make what the character was experiencing more clear. This use of imagery helped me to understand what was happening to the character through the use of senses.

Lit Term #3-
An example of an idiom was found on page 212 paragraph 1 in the book
And Then There Were None
. The example is, “We went over the place with a fine-tooth comb.” This is an idiom because the words do not literally make sense; going over a place with a fine-tooth comb means to go over a place or a thing carefully. This use of an idiom helped me to understand how the characters were searching the place in a precise, careful manner.

Lit Term #5
Lit Term #1
An example of a simile was found on page 162 paragraph 3 in the story
And Then There Were None
. The example is, “‘No!’ The word burst from her lips like an exploding shell.” This is a simile because the author is using the word “like” to compare how the woman said the word to an exploding shell. An exploding shell would be extremely fast and powerful, so the way she said “No!” would be as well. This use of a simile helped me to understand how the word “No!” spoken by the woman came out of her mouth quickly and with force.

Brooke McCormick
Sam Side
And Then There Were None
Pages 161-247
Period 4


An example of an allusion was found on page 212 paragraph 4 in the book And Then There Were None. The example is, “‘He must have prepared a secret place beforehand--naturally--of course it’s just what he would do. You know, like a Priest’s Hole in old manor houses.’” This is an allusion because if a reader was not aware of what a Priest’s hole is (it is a hiding spot for priests for Catholic homes many years ago), they would not understand what was referred to in the story. They would not comprehend it as clearly. This use of an allusion helped me to understand what kind of hiding spot one of the characters was speaking of.
Full transcript