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Mountain Men

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sofia mazursky

on 14 April 2015

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Transcript of Mountain Men

Mountain Men
Mountain Men hunted animals for fur
Buckskin clothes
Crude wool hats
Shoes of buffalo or deerskin
Crude snowshoes
Beavers
Beavers were the most common animal the Mountain Men hunted
They had to keep moving to find more beavers
Moved West to
follow beavers
Location
St. Louis, Missouri
Trading Post
The Mountain Men traded pelts for food, weapons, and supplies
What They Wore
Beliefs
Weapons
Barnett Trade Gun
Pukamoggran
Steelyard knife
A wrong step could lead to instant death
The Mountain Men were Catholics
Idaho
Utah
Wyoming
Oregon
Where They Came From
Saint Louis, Missouri
were famous in town
often traveled to many different locations for game
Population of beavers declined quickly
Legacy
Routes became California and Oregon trails
Risks
Attacked by thieves, Indians, wolves, and bears
Lots died of diseases
Traveled on high mountains
Amount of beavers went down over time
Took place in July
Barnett Trade Gun
Steelyard knife
Pukamoggran
Diseases
Small Pox
Chlamydia
Malaria
Gonorrhea
Syphilis
Yellow Fever
Trading posts made into stations for settlers moving west
Personal journals
Starvation and exposure
By 1830 most of the beaver population was killed off
Could only trap in the fall and spring
During spring the coats were thick from winter
Trapping Season
Rendezvous
Began as a gathering to exchange pelts
Became a month long carnival in the wilderness
Festival caught the attention of others
Appearance
Shoulder-length hair
Heavy beards
Red, wind-burned faces
Weather-beaten individuals
Other Occupations
Tanner
Other Animals
Works Cited
Deer
Foxes
Bears
Wolves
Rabbits
Squirrels
"Avillage.web.virginia.edu - University of Virginia." Web. 27. Mar. 2015

"Mountain Men: Lifestyle"
Mountain Men: Lifestyle
. Web. 27. Mar. 2015.

Smith, C. Carter. The Riches of the West: A Sourcebook on the American West. A Millbrook Press Library ed. Brookfield, Conn.: Millbrook, 1992. Print.

"The Mountain Men." The Mountain Men. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Mar. 2015.

Web. 23 Mar. 2015. <http://wyomuseum.state.wy.us/pdf/DTMountainMan.pdf>.


Battle Scars
Often had bullet wounds
Had spear head wounds
All due to reckless Indians
Often lost toes, fingers, and noses from frostbite
Endured all this pain, but still did their jobs
International spy
Venture capitalist
Wilderness scout
Frontier diplomat
Indian fighter
Explorer
Cartographer
Riverman
Hunter
Fisherman
Housing
Lived in log cabins
Lived in camp sites
ugly ass cabin
sausage!
eat my ass
b
bitch town
Full transcript