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British Literature poem project

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by

Olivia Rainville

on 12 April 2013

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Transcript of British Literature poem project

Olivia Rainville, Heavenleigh Walker, Xinru Zhang, Cindy Zhang & Sophie Casale When you are old
By: William Butler Yeats When you are old When you are old and grey and full of sleep, and nodding by the fire, take done this book, and slowly read, and dream of the soft look your eyes had once, and of their shadows deep; When you are old He recalls the days he was in her life and very much in love with her. Yeats chooses not to directly say that he is the narrator to match the mysterious qualities of the third stanza.
But in doing so, he has allowed the reader to interpret some secrets of himself. He hopes that if, once old, she pulls down the book, she will grow chilly and sorrowful that she did not see how steadfast his love was but how foolish she was taking no notice of it. When you are old Yeats' diction changes as the poem progresses from stanza to stanza When you are old The rhyme scheme of this poem is ABBA CDDC EFFE When you are old "When you are old and grey and full of sleep, and nodding by the fire, take down this book, and slowly read" How many loved your moments of glad grace and loved your beauty with love false or true, but one man loved the pilgrim soul in you, and loved the sorrows of your changing face; And bending down beside the glowing bars, murmur, a little sadly how love fled and paced upon the mountains overhead and hid his face amid a crowd of stars In his opening, he instructs an "old and gray" woman "full of sleep" to "slowly read" a book of memories from her youth. She is comfortable and lazy in her age, now living out her days dozing idly.
These words soothe and ease the reader into a likewise comfortable state to better their understanding of his intention
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