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Elizabeth "Bessie" Coleman

A Prezi about Elizabeth "Bessie" Coleman. If more information needed about her, there is a video on the last slide.
by

LuCena Fire Emblem

on 3 March 2016

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Transcript of Elizabeth "Bessie" Coleman

Birth
Elizabeth "Bessie" Coleman
Education
Schools Coleman went to are:
- Berlitz School in Chicago
-Langston University
-Caudron Brother's School of Aviation

Career
Coleman had two jobs:
-a manicurist at the White Sox Barber Shop
-aviator
Death
Conclusion
Introduction
Elizabeth "Bessie" Coleman was the first African American woman aviator, or pilot. In this Prezi, I will give you important facts about her in 5 categories, which are birth, education, career, death, and contribution to society.
Coleman was born on January 26, 1892 in Atlanta, Texas, the tenth of 13 children from her parents, George and Susan Coleman.
Coleman died in a practice for an airshow with her mechanic and publicity agent, William D. Wills, when she was only 34 years old on April 30, 1926.

Bessie Coleman was awesome! For more information on her, watch the video below.*

*Video is not allowed at school
because of YouTube.
Contribution to Society
Bessie Coleman contributed to society by becoming the first African American and African American woman to become an aviator. This proves that anyone can do anything they want to.
1892-1926
Full transcript