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History of the Corning Glass Works

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Kim Reep

on 16 September 2013

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Transcript of History of the Corning Glass Works

1870 - The firm had suffered sever financial hardships and was declared bankrupt. On September 15, 1870, the company was ordered into receivership and Amory Houghton, Sr. retired.

1871 - In early 1871 Nathan Cushing of Boston bought the business. He placed Amory Houghton, Jr. (1837-1909) in charge as manager.

1872 - Amory Houghton, Jr. bought the business on credit. It survived the Panic of 1873.

1875 - Amory Houghton, Jr. became President of the firm now reorganized as Corning Glass Works. Brother Charles F. Houghton (1846-1897), and others, became partners in the firm.

In 1910 Alanson B. Houghton (1863-1941) became President of the firm.
In 1854 Amory Houghton, Sr. organized the Union Glass Co. in Somerville, MA. He was one of the principals. Francis Houghton, Amory's son or brother, served as President. The Union Glass Co. failed in 1860. It was reorganized, perhaps as Union Glass Works.


In 1868 Amory Houghton, Sr. removed the Brooklyn Flint Glass Works to Corning, NY, renaming it the Corning Flint Glass Works. He became President of the firm. The plant's fittings were moved via the Erie Canal and its Corning feeder.
Corning Glass Works - Flood of 1889
In 1911 Corning Glass Works became a national corporation rather than a family controlled one.
In 1851 Amory Houghton, Sr. (1813-1882), a coal and wood dealer, became affiliated with Bay State Glass Works in Cambridge, MA. He served on the Board of Directors.
History of the Corning Glass Works
In 1918 Corning Glass Works acquired Steuben Glass (Founded 1903 by the Englishman, Frederick Carder, its major product was colored art glass tableware). Steuben became a division of the parent firm.

Alanson B. Houghton was elected to Congress, 37th District.
Frederick Carder
Steuben Glass
Frederick Carder with his wares
1919 - Arthur A. Houghton Sr. (1866-1928) became President of the firm. Alanson B. Houghton became Chairman of the Board.

1920 - Elmira lawyer Alexander D. Falck became President of the firm when Alanson B. Houghton left for public service and Arthur A. Houghton Sr. fell ill.
[Alanson B. Houghton was reelected to Congress.]
1923 - [Alanson B. Houghton was appointed to be Ambassador to Germany.]
1925 - [Alanson B. Houghton resigned as Ambassador to Germany in February. In April he was appointed to the Court of St. James.]
1928 - [Alanson B. Houghton resigned as Ambassador to the Court of St. James.]

1928 - Eugene C. Sullivan became President of the firm.

Arthur A. Houghton Sr.
Alexander D. Falck
Amory "Am" Houghton, Sr. (1899-1981) became President of the firm in 1930. Alexander D. Falck was Chairmen of the Board, and Alanson B. Houghton was Chairman of Executive Committee.

In 1933 The Steuben Division was reorganized as Steuben Glass, Incorporated, wholly owned by Corning Glass Works. Arthur A. Houghton, Jr. (1906-1990) assumed presidency of the new firm. Water-clear colorless glass replaced the old art glass colors.

Corning Glass Works was reincorporated again in 1936 as Corning Glass Works, possibly because of the acquisition of Macbeth-Evans, the maker of specialty glass products with a history that paralleled Corning's. Corning adopted Macbeth-Evan's Logo - a glass blower dubbed "Little Joe."
Amory Houghton Sr.
Amory Houghton Sr.
1941 - Glen W. Cole (1895-1955) became President of the firm. Amory Houghton, Sr., became Chairman of Board

1945 - Corning Glass Works became a public corporation. Stock traded on the New York Stock Exchange as "GLW."

1946 - William C. Decker became President of the firm. Amory Houghton, Sr. continued as Chairman of the Board.

1951 - The Corning Glass Center was opened. Comprised of The Corning Museum of Glass, the Hall of Science and Steuben Glass, it marked the 100th anniversary of the company. Amory Houghton and Arthur A. Houghton were the instigators of the project.

1961 - Amory "Amo" Houghton, Jr. (1926 - ) became President of the firm. William C. Decker became Chairman of the Board. Amory Houghton, Sr. became Chairman of the Executive Committee. [Amory Houghton, Sr. returned to Corning from France.]

Glen W. Cole
Amory Houghton, Sr.
Amory Houghton Jr.
Eugene C. Sullivan
1964 - R. Lee Waterman became President of the firm. Amory Houghton, Jr. became Chairman of the Board. William C. Decker became Chairman of the Executive Committee. (Amory Houghton, Sr. retired April 1963. Continued his service as honorary Chairman of the Board.)

1971 - Thomas C. MacAvoy became President of the firm. Amory Houghton, Jr. continued as Chairman of the Board.

1983 - James R. Houghton became Chief Executive Officer of firm. Businesses were regrouped. Office of company-wide President was eliminated. Amory Houghton, Jr. became Chairman of Executive Committee. Arthur A. Houghton, Jr. resigned as Chairman of Steuben.

1986 - James R. Houghton continued as Chairman of the Board. Roger G. Ackerman, Richard Dulude, and E. Martin Gibson became "Group Presidents." Amory Houghton, Jr. no longer listed. [He began service as a U.S. Congressman this year.]

1989 - Firm was reorganized as Corning Incorporated.
Dick Dulude
James Houghton
Van Campbell
Tom MacAvoy
E. Martin Gibson
Bill Hudson
In 1864 Amory Houghton, Sr. sold the Union Glass Co., and purchased the Brooklyn Flint Glass Works, formerly owned by John Loftus Gilliland, which had failed in 1855.
Feeder Canal, Gibson, NY
Feeder Canal, Gibson, NY
Feeder Canal, Gibson, NY
Boat bringing the Glass Works to Corning NY in 1868
Mules pulling a simialar boat down the Erie Canal
Amory Houghton Jr
.
William Decker
James Houghton
Tom MacAvoy
R. Lee Waterman
Amory Houghton Jr.
Roger Ackerman
Early Corning Glass Works Factory
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