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Sonnet 18 by William Shakespeare.

English 9 project for Ms.Adams
by

effy obasi

on 23 September 2012

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Transcript of Sonnet 18 by William Shakespeare.

Sonnet 18 by
William Shakespeare.

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date:
. SONNET 18 Imagery Alliteration Personification Metaphor "Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines" This line states personification as because
it is giving human qualities to something
non-human "heaven doesn't have an eye" "Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May" This is referring to the SIGHT.
Because this line clearly states the growing of buds 'Flowers' during the season of May. " So long lives this, and this gives life to thee" Usage of 'L' and 'T' And every fair from fair sometime declines, Usage of 'F's ' "And often is his gold complexion dimmed," In this particular line : Using HIS for GOLD.
human use for something non-human. Similies "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day" The speaker announces his first simile--a comparison-- in the first line: by comparing the woman he loves to a summer day Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, "Darling buds : are referred to as Flowers as in
plant life and the conditions needed to sustain life, so he is saying his lover is the reasoning he is living. Sometime too hot the eye
of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion
dimmed,
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course untrimmed:
But thy eternal summer
shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wander'st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st,
So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee Rhyme End Rhyme : Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And every fair from fair sometime declines And often is his gold complexion dimmed, By chance, or nature's changing course untrimmed: Internal Rhyme And every fair from fair sometime declines, Rhyme Scheme. Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? A
Thou art more lovely and more temperate: B
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, A
And summer's lease hath all too short a date: B
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, C
And often is his gold complexion dimmed, D
And every fair from fair sometime declines, C
By chance, or nature's changing course untrimmed: D
But thy eternal summer shall not fade, E
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st, F
Nor shall death brag thou wander'st in his shade, E
When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st, F
So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see, G
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee. G Quatrain, Quatrain, Quatrain Couplet Pattern: AbAbCdCdEfEfGG Tone / Mood TONE: Sonnet 18 has a tone of admiring, affectionate, and romantic.
Evidence: "Thou art more lovely and temperate" Mood: The sonnet has a mood of dreamy, flirty, and awed.
Evidence:"So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this and this gives life to thee." And everything beautiful sometimes loses its beauty. Analysis Should I compare you to a summer's day?
You are more lovely and more passionate Rough winds shake the beloved flowers
And summer is to short
The sun is sometimes hot or normally goes behind the clouds. You can't control the nature, it keeps changing by accident or by tides But your age will not fade
Death will not visit you
Because in my heart you will live forever So long there is people on this earth,
So long will this poem live on, making you immortal The theme of the poem is LOVE NEVER DIES.
Evidence: "When in eternal lines to time thou growest."
This quote communicates that the speaker's lover will always be in his/her heart regardless of what happens. Theme The sonnet is written to a loved one because through out the poem the speaker is expressing his love and affection. Intended Audience By : Effiem Obasi, Bianca Rodriguez, Isaac Pleasant, Damon Mc., and Nathaniel Vocabulary Temperate: moderate or self-Restrained

The eye of the heaven: sun

Nature's changing course: the natural changes age brings

The fair thou ow'st: that beauty posses
Rhyme: A repetition of similar sounds or words
End Rhyme: A rhyme that occurs in the last syllables of a verse.

Internal Rhyme: rhyme created by two or more words in the same line of verse.
Rhyme Scheme: a regular pattern of a rhyme that is consistent throughout the poem Objective IWBAT understand the concept of mood, tone, literary devices, and a theme of a sonnet. IWBAT to analyze Shakespeare's Sonnet.
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