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Cold War Propaganda

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by

Sudarshan Thirumalai

on 30 November 2015

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Transcript of Cold War Propaganda

Cold War Propaganda
The United States (Anti Communist)
By Ryan Sheehy and Sudarshan Thirumalai
The Soviet Union (Communist)
Cold War propaganda permeated the life of Soviets and Americans alike.
Both countries tried to express their superiority over the other
Propaganda showed itself through posters, movies, music, TV shows, literature, art, sports, and education
Civil defense from a nuclear strike was also a focus for both countries.
http://www.designer-daily.com/10-amazing-cold-war-propaganda-posters-2901

http://englishrussia.com/2006/09/20/soviet-propaganda-against-usa-posters/

Hixson, Walter L. Parting the Curtain: Propaganda, Culture, and the Cold War, 1945-61. Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1997. Print.

http://englishrussia.com/2006/09/20/soviet-propaganda-against-usa-posters/

http://www.designer-daily.com/examples-of-american-cold-war-propaganda-2918
References:
Depicts the USA and USSR, side-by-side, as identical Superman characters
It implies that each nation is simply a mirror image of the other and that both are equally harmful and destructive
Why Superman?
Superman is a masculine and ridiculous figure, thus depicting the Cold War itself


Superman
By Roman Cieslewicz
1968
Jo-Jo The Dove
Unknown
1951
Made by the French anti-communist group, Paix et Liberté
Mocks Stalin’s promotion of peaceful values
Stalin is depicted as a peace protestor with sinister motives
holding a “Peace” sign in one hand and a weapon in the other
America Under Communism
Unknown
This poster shows communism burning up the american flag
The Soviets are seen attacking the American people
Apocalyptic in nature
Novel Cover
1956
This piece shows the horror of a Soviet dominated America
The explosions and buildings being destroyed in the distance further emphasizes the need to stop the Soviets
The Red Iceberg
Comic

1960
Anti-Communist Ad
Canada Air
1955
Rocky IV
Movie
1985
Rocky IV was a movie about a hard working American defeating a Soviet cheat
At the end of the movie, even the soviets admit that the American is better, and cheer him on
Avengers Comic
"Red Guardian"
1967
Duck and Cover
1951
Red Rape
Book Cover
1960
The loudspeaker says that “Soviet Union offers to stop nuclear weapon tests”.
Uncle Sam, which represents the US, is sitting in a ring of nuclear detonation switches trying to set off as many as he can.
The ladder says "Nato."
It shows the US stockpiling missiles.
The dollar signs on the missiles show how evil capitalism is.
This is the Black Sea and Uncle Sam is looking through a spyglass on USSR with a sign “Provocation” on it.
He is standing on US warships.
Uncle Sam was widely used to represent USA in soviet propaganda.
To Fly Higher Than All, Farther Than All, Faster Than All [D. Pjatkin, 1954]
Published one year after Stalin’s death, this poster reinforces the message that Soviet research and development of weapons and machinery is ongoing.
The Soviets are trying to display their military and building supremacy compared to the rest of the world.
If You Want To Be Like Me- Just Train! [V. Koretskiy, 1951]
The Soviets wanted a strong, beautiful people to show their supremacy.
The Soviet Union also wanted strong citizens who could work for the benefit of the Motherland.
This photograph depicts an evil Uncle Sam.
It also depicts a hardworking Russian, which shows the value that the Soviets put on working for the Motherland.
Same Year Different Weather [Unknown, Year Unknown]
The black thermometer shows the “American Industry Rate” is well below the “Soviet Industry Rate”, which is displayed on the red thermometer.
Dark clouds loom over the USA, and the USSR bathes in glorious sunshine, which shows the trouble in the American capitalist economy and the strength of the soviet communist economy.
People and the Party Are Undivided [M. V. Luk'janov and V.S. Karakashev, 1978]
In this poster, banners carried by marching Soviet citizens create a somewhat subtle image of Lenin’s face.
The caption reads “People and the party are undivided.”
A Mighty Sports Power [B. Reshetnikov, 1962]
By 1962, sporting events such as the Olympic Games had become hotly contested between the Soviet Union and the USA.
Each country was desperate to win in order to demonstrate their power and dominance over the other.
In the 1956 and 1960 Olympic Games, the Soviet Union was victorious.
The character in this poster has been painted to resemble an Olympic torch, with gold medals in the background.
The End
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