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Literary Devices in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams

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Abbey Moore

on 5 May 2013

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Transcript of Literary Devices in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams

"This ships hung in the air, much in the same way that bricks don't."
"His voice took on the quality of a cat shagging brushed nylon." Allusion Personification Hyperbole Theme Literary Devices "Zaphod Beeblebrox, adventurer, ex-hippie, good-timer, (crook? quite possibly), manic self-publicist, terribly bad at personal relationships, often thought to be completely out to lunch."
"And then whenever I stop to think—why did I want to do something?—how did I work out how to do it?—I get a very strong desire just to stop thinking about it."

"They can't think or imagine, most can't spell. They just run things."
Life is what you make it! The Hitchhiker's Guide
to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams Metaphor Symbolism "They wouldn't lift a finger to save their own grandmother... without orders signed in triplicate, sent in, sent back, queried, lost, found, subjected to public inquiry, lost again, and finally buried in soft peat for three months and recycled as firelighters." "The only thing that the bowl of petunias thought as they fell was "Oh no. Not again." Abbey Moore Foreshadowing 42 The destruction of Arthur Dent's house versus the destruction of the Earth

"I'm afraid you're going to have to accept it," said Mr. Prosser, gripping his fur hat and rolling it around the top of his head; "this bypass has got to be built and it's going to be built!"

"As you will no doubt be aware, the plans for development of the outlying regions of the Galaxy require the building of a hyperspatial express route through your star system, and regrettably your planet is one of those scheduled for demolition." The Babel Fish Biblical: Tower of Babel
God says, "If as one people speaking the same language they have begun to do this, then nothing they plan to do will be impossible for them." ""Listen!"
"But I can't speak Vogon!"
"You don't need to. Just put this fish in your ear." He was experiencing the aural equivalent of looking at a picture of two black silhouetted faces and suddenly seeing it as a picture of a white candlestick." Simile "...holding it as if it was a two-week-dead lark..."
"It invariably produces a concoction that is almost, but not quite entirely unlike tea."
"Vogons have as much sex appeal as a road accident." Zaphod Beeblobrox and The Vogons: politicians Understatement "Won an award, you know. Lovely crinkly edges. I was most upset to hear of its destruction. The mice were furious."

"If you're a researcher on this book thing and you were on Earth, you must have been gathering material on it."
"Well, I was able to extend the original entry a bit, yes."
"Let me see what it says in this edition, then. I've got to see it."
... "What? Harmless! Is that all it's got to say? Harmless! One word! ... Well, for God's sake I hope you managed to rectify that a bit."
"Oh yes, well I managed to transmit a new entry off to the editor. He had to trim it a bit, but it's still an improvement."
"And what does it say now?" asked Arthur.
"Mostly harmless," admitted Ford with a slightly embarrassed cough. Irony "There was a planet in which a third of its population were thinkers, a third of its population were do-ers, and a third of its population were telephone sanitizers. The thinkers and do-ers wanted to be rid of the telephone sanitizers, so they told the telephone sanitizers that the planet was to be eaten by a giant mutant star-goat, and sent them off in a vast space ark. Shortly after this, all the thinkers and do-ers were wiped out by a virulent disease contracted from a dirty telephone." “Good morning,” said Deep Thought at last.
“Er… good morning, O Deep Thought,” said Loonquawl nervously, “do you have… er, that is…”
“An answer for you?” interrupted Deep Thought majestically. “Yes. I have.”
The two men shivered with expectancy. Their waiting had not been in vain.
“There really is one?” breathed Phouchg.
“There really is one,” confirmed Deep Thought.
“To Everything? To the great Question of Life, the Universe and Everything?”
“Yes.”

“Though I don’t think,” added Deep Thought, “that you’re going to like it.”

“Tell us!”
“All right,” said Deep Thought. The Answer to the Great Question…”
“Yes…!”
“Of Life, the Universe and Everything…” said Deep Thought.
“Yes…!”
“Is…” said Deep Thought, and paused.
“Yes…!”
“Is…”
“Yes…!!!…?”
“Forty-two,” said Deep Thought, with infinite majesty and calm. "Forty-two!" yelled Loonquawl. "Is that all you've got to show for seven and a half million years' work?"
"I checked very thoroughly," said the computer, "and that quite definitely is the answer. I think the problem, to be quite honest with you, is that you've never actually known what the question is." Shut up and go away,
and take your bloody
bypass with you! So Long
and Thanks
for all the Fish! The End
Full transcript