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Three Agricultural Revolutions

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by

Sean Morris

on 18 February 2015

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Transcript of Three Agricultural Revolutions

Major Impacts
Second Agricultural Revolution
First Agricultural Revolution
3 Agricultural Revolutions
Notes
Place your own picture
behind this frame!
Double click to crop it if necessary
San Francisco
Budapest
Important
Details
(cc) photo by Metro Centric on Flickr
(cc) photo by Franco Folini on Flickr
(cc) photo by jimmyharris on Flickr
Stockholm
(cc) photo by Metro Centric on Flickr
Sedentary Lifestyle
Population Increase
Surplus allowed for Specialization of Labor
Allowed for secondary and tertiary sectors of economy to develop
(8,000-5,000 BC)
Vegetative Agriculture
Shifting Cultivation
Farms are abandoned after they lose their fertility
Coincides with Industrial Revolution -New Tech
New crops from the Americas
Crop Rotation
Gov't Policy - Enclosure Movement
Urbanization
Food from the America had higher caloric value
Growth of cities
Pollution
Unsanitary
First Take off industries: Textiles
Assets
map
details
doodles
notes
outlook
photo frame
Interregional Migration
Health
Cradle of Civilization
Slash & Burn Farming
Seed Agriculture
(Sauer) - cloning of existing plants - stems, roots ; replanting from the wild
Annual seed planting
17th-18th Centuries
Interregional Migration
Ended common lands
Potatoes grow in anything
Small farms became large farms
Workers forced to migrate to cities
Less Labor needed to produce
Less Labor needed to produce
The Third Agricultural Revolution
The Green Revolution 1970's
Increase Yield
Seed & Fertilizers
Eliminate Hunger
It's not that we don't have enough food, it's that it's not distributed equally.
Long - term soil degradation
GE or GMO
Genetically Engineered
75% of all processed food in U.S.
Ideological Aversion
Western Europe
Norman Borlaug
Norman Borlaug
The majority of domesticated animals and plants are from this region
Full transcript