Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

The Breakfast Club

No description
by

Lorri Caldwell

on 15 April 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of The Breakfast Club

.
.
For each person who watches The Breakfast Club, the characters portray someone we know or once knew in high school. For many of us, we can place ourselves in one of the stereotypes it portrays. The basic context of the movie is still repeated in sitcoms today (such as That 70’s show, Friends, or The Big Bang Theory).
In my own gifted classroom, I do see some of the tendencies as very accurate, but I see each of my students as more diverse than how they are portrayed in the movie. For example, I see tendencies consistent with Bender, but with some of the athlete incorporated too. I don’t think gifted students can be so easily placed into the cookie-cutter stereotypes the movie portrayed. Maybe it is because my students are middle school and their identities are not fully developed and are still so drastically altered by peers. But, I do think the movie is consistent with the insecurities and pressures felt by gifted students. Bender was certainly not the only one who was gifted! Obviously Brian, the brain, was the smart/gifted one, but also Allison, the basket-case, has strong gifted indicators.

Video Clips
Identity
SOCIAL
The Breakfast Club
A group of high school students attend Saturday morning detention. Throughout the day, they explore their stereotypical characteristics as they try to understand their own unique identities.
Bender’s social and emotional development is dysfunctional at best. Other factors which may contribute to his affective development include resilience, emotional sensitivity, intensity, and depth, and possibly the need for self-actualization. He also has a highly developed sense of humor. Although, in Bender’s character, these other aspects have a much more negative connotation than normally applied. Bender’s resilience is obvious in the fact that he has found ways to deal with his family issues and is still self-confident and very strong in his actions and beliefs. Bender’s slanderous comments against the other characters shows keen observations about each of them personally. His sensitivity, intensity, and depth are not used in a positive way, but it cannot be denied that he posses those traits. It is as though he can see through their defenses and use those weaknesses to expose the insecurities of the other characters. Lastly, Bender’s sarcasm is actually quite humorous throughout the movie. His highly developed sense of humor draws the other characters to him, although they don’t want it directed at them.

John Bender
"The Criminal"
And these children
that you spit on
as they try to change their worlds
are immune to your consultations.
They're quite aware of what they're going through.
David Bowie
T
Describe to me who you think you are...
Movie opening: Students arrive for Saturday Detention
Finding Themselves
For each person who watches The Breakfast Club, the characters portray someone we know or once knew in high school. For many of us, we can place ourselves in one of the stereotypes it portrays. The basic context of the movie is still repeated in sitcoms today (such as That 70’s show, Friends, or The Big Bang Theory).
In my own gifted classroom, I do see some of the tendencies as very accurate, but I see each of my students as more diverse than how they are portrayed in the movie. For example, I see tendencies consistent with Bender, but with some of the athlete incorporated too. I don’t think gifted students can be so easily placed into the cookie-cutter stereotypes the movie portrayed. Maybe it is because my students are middle school and their identities are not fully developed and are still so drastically altered by peers. But, I do think the movie is consistent with the insecurities and pressures felt by gifted students. Bender was certainly not the only one who was gifted! Obviously Brian, the brain, was the smart/gifted one, but also Allison, the basket-case, has strong gifted indicators.

Accuracy? Portrayal of real gifted students?

Facilitation of moral discussions and small group counseling

Although Bender seems to despise each of the others in detention that day, he does instigate the interaction and discussion among them. He believes he is being realistic and states, “I’m just trying to help her” when questioning “the princess” about her parent’s divorce. Whether Bender wants to engage them in conversation only to destroy their self image or whether he actually enjoys the conversation and challenge is hard to gauge in the movie. What is clear is that he leaves feeling a sense of accomplishment in the interactions that day. Continued discussions would be a helpful strategy to help Bender work through his feelings and learn appropriate ways to interact with others without aggression and insult.

Strategies explained…

Extracurricular activities involving social action

Bender does not seem involved in any extracurricular activities. He makes fun of the others for being involved in school clubs which he feels are useless. Interestingly, he defends “the brain” against “the princess” when she insults academic clubs versus social clubs at school. He points out that the physics club is “demented and sad, but still sorta social” and “just as important to him (Brian).”
Rather than punishing Bender’s behavior with repeated Saturday detentions, he could be enrolled in community hours at a local shelter for abused women and children. As a victim of abuse himself, this social action could allow him to see that he is not alone in his struggle against physical violence. Ultimately, it may help him shed his “criminal” stereotype and stop his bullying behaviors.

Strategies explained…

Mentorship
To address Bender’s lack of respect for authority and the lack of strong role models in his life, Bender could benefit from a mentorship program. If an adult Bender respected showed encouragement, guidance, and belief in his abilities through mentorship, there could be strong, positive outcomes. If mentorship worked constructively for Bender, he could become a mentor for troubled youth as his resilience and sensitivity are strong traits for community service.

Strategies explained…

Mentorship
Extracurricular activities involving social action
Facilitation of moral discussions and small group counseling


Strategies that would be helpful for Bender

Bender’s social and emotional development is dysfunctional at best. Other factors which may contribute to his affective development include resilience, emotional sensitivity, intensity, and depth, and possibly the need for self-actualization. He also has a highly developed sense of humor. Although, in Bender’s character, these other aspects have a much more negative connotation than normally applied. Bender’s resilience is obvious in the fact that he has found ways to deal with his family issues and is still self-confident and very strong in his actions and beliefs. Bender’s slanderous comments against the other characters shows keen observations about each of them personally. His sensitivity, intensity, and depth are not used in a positive way, but it cannot be denied that he posses those traits. It is as though he can see through their defenses and use those weaknesses to expose the insecurities of the other characters. Lastly, Bender’s sarcasm is actually quite humorous throughout the movie. His highly developed sense of humor draws the other characters to him, although they don’t want it directed at them.



Other aspects of affective development

Family definitely plays a compelling role in Bender’s defiant behavior, underachievement, and anger issues. Bender indicates that his father verbally abuses him and even physically abuses him showing the group a burn on his arm from a cigar because he spilled paint on the floor of the garage. Bender’s mother seems to be unable to support him against the violence as she is victim herself. He sees family as a liability and is angry that others have the “perfect family”. He uses family as a weapon for insult against the other students.

Information from and interaction
with parents/family members

Bender is defensive and arrogant toward the other students in detention. His aggressive behavior begins immediately as he begin the assault of stereotypical insults against the others. His aggression is most focused on the characters deemed “The Princess” and “Sport”; this antagonistic behavior is rooted in his own feelings of insecurity and his anger over socioeconomic and family stressors.

Reactions to Peers

Bender displays severe negative reactions to the school environment. He has extreme disrespect for authority which can be seen in his comments and actions toward Mr. Vernon, the principal. He also shows disrespect for school property when he damages the library books and furniture. The school environment appears to be a place to act out his anger about his home environment. Bender refuses to accept authority and receives two more months of Saturday detention when gets into a confrontational faceoff with Vernon.

Reactions to the school environment

Looking at The Breakfast Club from a Gifted Perspective

The other characters seem to have mixed feelings about Bender. They fluctuate between being intimated by him to being impressed by him. The “Princess” is disgusted by his continuous comments regarding her virginity, her wealth, and her social status. At times, the characters seem to feel sorry for him, especially when he reenacts scenes with his father and the physical abuse. Interestingly, the “athlete” does not seem to believe many of his claims, and even challenges Bender several times throughout the movie. Their differences escalate to physical violence where the athlete quickly overcomes Bender. The “basket-case” is impressed by his ability to disregard what others think about him. The “Brain” works to achieve his acceptance and approval; Bender is a way to explore life in ways he has only dreamed of but was too confined by norms to allow.

Other’s reaction to John Bender

“The Criminal”
Bender, as he is referred to in the movie, has received detention for pulling the fire alarm.
Bender shows several indicators for being unidentified gifted.
Underachiever
Strong vocabulary and increased problem solving skills
Confidence and leadership skills

John Bender

John Bender

“The Criminal”

John Bender, as he is referred to in the movie, has
received detention for pulling the fire alarm.

Bender shows several indicators for being
unidentified gifted.
Underachiever
Strong vocabulary and increased problem solving skills
Confidence and leadership skills

Looking at The Breakfast Club from a Gifted Perspective

Bender displays severe negative reactions to the school environment. He has extreme disrespect for authority which can be seen in his comments and actions toward Mr. Vernon, the principal. He also shows disrespect for school property when he damages the library books and furniture. The school environment appears to be a place to act out his anger about his home environment. Bender refuses to accept authority and receives two more months of Saturday detention when gets into a confrontational faceoff with Vernon.

Reactions to the school environment

Bender is defensive and arrogant toward the other students in detention. His aggressive behavior begins immediately as he begin the assault of stereotypical insults against the others. His aggression is most focused on the characters deemed “The Princess” and “Sport”; this antagonistic behavior is rooted in his own feelings of insecurity and his anger over socioeconomic and family stressors.

Reactions to Peers

The other characters seem to have mixed feelings about Bender. They fluctuate between being intimated by him to being impressed by him. The “Princess” is disgusted by his continuous comments regarding her virginity, her wealth, and her social status. At times, the characters seem to feel sorry for him, especially when he reenacts scenes with his father and the physical abuse. Interestingly, the “athlete” does not seem to believe many of his claims, and even challenges Bender several times throughout the movie. Their differences escalate to physical violence where the athlete quickly overcomes Bender. The “basket-case” is impressed by his ability to disregard what others think about him. The “Brain” works to achieve his acceptance and approval; Bender is a way to explore life in ways he has only dreamed of but was too confined by norms to allow.

Other’s reaction to John Bender

Family definitely plays a compelling role in Bender’s defiant behavior, underachievement, and anger issues.
Bender indicates that his father verbally abuses him and even physically abuses him showing the group a burn on his arm from a cigar because he spilled paint on the floor of the garage. Bender’s mother seems to be unable to support him against the violence as she is victim herself. He sees family as a liability and is angry that others have the “perfect family”. He uses family as a weapon for insult against the other students.

Information from and interaction
with parents/family members

The other characters seem to have mixed feelings about Bender. They fluctuate between being intimated by him to being impressed by him. The “Princess” is disgusted by his continuous comments regarding her virginity, her wealth, and her social status. At times, the characters seem to feel sorry for him, especially when he reenacts scenes with his father and the physical abuse. Interestingly, the “athlete” does not seem to believe many of his claims, and even challenges Bender several times throughout the movie. Their differences escalate to physical violence where the athlete quickly overcomes Bender. The “basket-case” is impressed by his ability to disregard what others think about him. The “Brain” works to achieve his acceptance and approval; Bender is a way to explore life in ways he has only dreamed of but was too confined by norms to allow.

Other’s reaction to John Bender

Family definitely plays a compelling role in Bender’s defiant behavior, underachievement, and anger issues. Bender indicates that his father verbally abuses him and even physically abuses him showing the group a burn on his arm from a cigar because he spilled paint on the floor of the garage. Bender’s mother seems to be unable to support him against the violence as she is victim herself. He sees family as a liability and is angry that others have the “perfect family”. He uses family as a weapon for insult against the other students.

I
nformation from and interaction
with parents/family members



The other characters seem to have mixed feelings about Bender. They fluctuate between being intimated by him to being impressed by him. The “Princess” is disgusted by his continuous comments regarding her virginity, her wealth, and her social status. At times, the characters seem to feel sorry for him, especially when he reenacts scenes with his father and the physical abuse. Interestingly, the “athlete” does not seem to believe many of his claims, and even challenges Bender several times throughout the movie. Their differences escalate to physical violence where the athlete quickly overcomes Bender. The “basket-case” is impressed by his ability to disregard what others think about him. The “Brain” works to achieve his acceptance and approval; Bender is a way to explore life in ways he has only dreamed of but was too confined by norms to allow.

Other’s reaction to John Bender

The other characters seem to have mixed feelings about Bender. They fluctuate between being intimated by him to being impressed by him. The “Princess” is disgusted by his continuous comments regarding her virginity, her wealth, and her social status. At times
the characters seem to feel sorry for him, especially when he reenacts scenes with his father and the physical abuse. Interestingly, the “athlete” does not seem to believe many of his claims, and even challenges Bender several times throughout the movie. Their differences escalate to physical violence where the athlete quickly overcomes Bender. The “basket-case” is impressed by his ability to disregard what others think about him. The “Brain” works to achieve his acceptance and approval; Bender is a way to explore life in ways he has only dreamed of but was too confined by norms to allow.

Peer reaction to John Bender

Bender is defensive and arrogant toward the other
students in detention. His aggressive behavior starts immediately as he begins the assault of stereotypical
insults against the others. His aggression is most
focused on the characters deemed “The Princess”
and “Sport”; this antagonistic behavior is rooted in
his own feelings of insecurity and his anger over socioeconomic and family stressors.

Mentorship
Extracurricular activities involving social action
Facilitation of moral discussions and
small group counseling

To address Bender’s lack of respect for authority and the lack of strong role models in his life, Bender could benefit from a mentorship program. If an adult Bender respected showed encouragement, guidance, and belief in his abilities through mentorship, there could be strong, positive outcomes. If mentorship worked constructively for Bender, he could become a mentor for troubled youth as his resilience and sensitivity are strong traits for community service.

Bender does not seem involved in any extracurricular activities. He makes fun of the others for being involved in school clubs which he feels are useless. Interestingly, he defends “the brain” against “the princess” when she insults academic clubs versus social clubs at school. He points out that the physics club is “demented and sad, but still sorta social” and “just as important to him (Brian).” Rather than punishing Bender’s behavior with repeated Saturday detentions, he could be enrolled in community hours at a local shelter for abused women and children. As a victim of abuse himself, this social action could allow him to see that he is not alone in his struggle against physical violence. Ultimately, it may help him shed his “criminal” stereotype and stop his bullying behaviors.

Although Bender seems to despise each of the others in detention that day, he does instigate the interaction and discussion among them. He believes he is being realistic and states, “I’m just trying to help her” when questioning “the princess” about her parent’s divorce. Whether Bender wants to engage them in conversation only to destroy their self image or whether he actually enjoys the conversation and challenge is hard to gauge in the movie. What is clear is that he leaves feeling a sense of accomplishment in the interactions that day. Continued discussions would be a helpful strategy to help Bender work through his feelings and learn appropriate ways to interact with others without aggression and insult.


Strategies:
Other than the other students in detention, two other characters interact with John Bender in the movie. First, the principal Mr. Vernon, has a strong dislike and distrust of Bender evidenced several times through both verbal and physical confrontation. Although Vernon criticizes Bender, he does seem to recognize his potential as he offers him advice: "Spend more time doing something with yourself instead of trying to impress people." Vernon seems to see through the mask that Bender hides behind. Like many gifted students, Bender hides his intelligence and giftedness behind low grades and bad behavior to try and impress others. The only other character is Karl the janitor who Bender also mocks and insults. Neither adult thinks highly of Bender.

Reaction of others to John Bender
Full transcript