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Individualized Education Plan (IEP)

An overview of the major components of the IEP - Module 4
by

Shannon Ooten

on 1 July 2016

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Transcript of Individualized Education Plan (IEP)

The IEP:
Individualized Education Plan

Page 1
Transitions
Goals
LRE Page
INFO
Name
Address
Dates
Student Strengths,
Interests, and Preferences
-Parent Concerns
-Parent/Student's
Vision for the Future
-Consideration
of Transitions
By age 16... Consider the current skill development and ability as it relates to each area, list transition activities, person responsible for making these things happen, and a completion date.
How does the student's disability impact their school day?
Think about post high school expectations.
Living
Learning
Working
Credits
Which classes you still need to pass in order to graduate on time.
Reading Comprehension
Written Language
Math
Work
Completion
Behavior
GE or Non-Academic Services
Implementation
Modifications/Accommodations
Testing accommodations for district-wide tests
(*align with CR mods)
Do the student receive all their special education services in the general education classroom?
Yes or No?
Let's talk about service delivery
and related services.
Questions?
- Gain knowledge and information regarding
state/federal requirements regarding the
development of measurable annual goals
benchmarks, and short-term objectives.

- Identify the required components of measurable
annual goals, benchmarks, and short-term
objectives.

- Provide examples of appropriate measurable goals,
benchmarks, and short-term objectives.
Module Objectives
- North Carolina Policies Governing Services for
Children with Disabilities (November 1, 2007)

- Department of Education Federal Register
(August 14, 2006)

- http://IDEA.ed.gov
Policy and Resource References
NC Policy requires that the Individualized Education
Program include:

- (2)(i) A statement of measurable annual goals, including
academic and functional goals designed to:

(A) Meet the child’s needs that result from the child’s
disability to enable the child to be involved in and make
progress in the general education curriculum.

(B) Meet each of the child’s other educational needs
that result from the child’s disability.

(ii) For children with disabilities who take alternate
assessments aligned to alternate achievement
standards, a description of benchmarks or
short-term objectives.
•NC Policy 1503-4.1
Annual Goals - Make Them Measurable


Title 1/No Child Left Behind requires that students with disabilities assessed through modified achievement standards have annual goals aligned to grade level competencies.

In NC, students in grades 3-8 & 10 who are assessed via the Extend 2 are subject to this requirement.

ESEA 1111(h)
IDEA 612 (a)(15)
Remember!
- LEAs are not prohibited from requiring standards based IEPs for all students.

- While not required to be documented on the IEP for all students, in developing annual goals for all students, consideration must always be given to the state standards set forth in the general education curriculum.

- Connecting the standard to the annual goal maintains high expectations and improves results.
What about Creating Standards-based goals?
- Annual goals in the IEP are statements that describe what a child with a disability can reasonably be expected to accomplish within the duration of the IEP.

- A measurable annual goal is a statement that links directly to the areas of need identified in the present levels of academic achievement and functional performance.
Okay.. Let's get down to business!
For each area needing specially designed instruction, determine the desired level of achievement or outcome for each goal for a student by considering the following:

• Primary concerns stated in the present level of academic
achievement/functional performance.

• Amount of time the student has left in school and the age of
the student.

• Skills needed to progress to the next level of performance.

• Skills needed to achieve transition.

• Behavior and/or skills that will improve with modifications.
What Areas?
• Strengths of the student.

• Concerns of the parent for enhancing the education of her/his child.

• Scope and sequence of the skill, curricular or behavior areas addressed.

• An observable learner performance (what the learner will be doing, a
action).

• Measurable criteria which specify the level at which the student’s
performance will be acceptable (e.g., speed, accuracy, frequency)

•Clustering behaviors or skills that are related. Any important
givens/conditions (when, with what, where)…as applicable.

• The skill/domain area (academic, behavioral, functional).

• A Student’s learning behaviors.

• Special factors.
Always Consider
Characteristics of Measurability:

• Reveals what to do to measure whether the Goal has been accomplished.
• To measure something is to do something.
• Yields the same conclusion if measured by several people.
• A measurable goal allows us to know how much progress has been made since the last measured performance.
• A measurable goal can be measured as written, without additional information.
• Measurable goals contain givens (if necessary), the learner performance, and the criterion (level of performance to be reached).

If you cannot “measure” what is written…then it is not a measurable goal. For example, whether a student can “count to 10 without error” can be readily determined as it is stated. “Will improve counting skills” cannot be assessed without additional information.
What exactly does “measurable” mean?
Unfortunately, IDEA does not define it.C
Frequently used examples of criteria:

• 4 of 5 trials
• 3 consecutive days
• % accuracy

Use of percentage: “The history of how this strange use of percentage began appears to be lost. But we should know not to aspire to have Josh cross the street safely 80% of the time.”

Excerpt taken from: Writing Measurable IEP Goals and Objectives; Bateman & Herr, 2006

“The use of percentage needs to be carefully limited to a narrow range of goals”

Appropriate use of %: Jane will correctly spell 95% of the 6th grade spelling words dictated to her.Inappropriate use of %: Jane will improve her behavior 80% of the time with 90% accuracy.
Criterion or Level of Performance
Measurable Non-Measureable
Let's Compare
Present Level of Academic Achievement
and Functional Performance

A review of informal checklist of social/emotional skills, indicate that Isabel is very social and loves to tease her friends in a playful way. When required to complete tasks, Hope often avoids these tasks by talking with her friends, and it often takes 5-10 verbal prompts to get Hope to begin the task. Once she begins, she almost always completes the tasks. When she is tired she exhibits extreme emotions: uncontrollable giggling, sobbing, and occasional anger, approximately 5 times per week (according to parental and teacher report). This inhibits her progress in the general curriculum, as she needs direct instruction of social skills.

Annual Goal : When required to complete tasks, Isabel will begin the task with a maximum of 3 prompts.

Annual Goal: When Hope is tired, she will apply a replacement behavior in 3 of 4 instances.
Activity #1


A review of speech/language anecdotal log of observations
indicate that Star speaks using words and phrases. She does
not use complete sentences or questions when speaking. She
responds to greetings appropriately. She does not verbally
express herself to gain others attention. Instead she grabs
others and/or their clothing (e.g. hats, jackets) to initiate
conversation or join in a group. These skill deficits affect her
ability to communicate within the general education setting
and develop appropriate social skills.

Annual Goal: Given non-instructional activities Star will
improve expressive language skills to initiate and/or join
in conversations with others, an average of 3 times per
week.

Integrated Goal: Yes
Present Level of Academic Achievement
and Functional Performance
PLAAFP
Academic
Achievement
Functional
Level
Present
Present Level of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance Based on informal teacher assessment and review of observations from anecdotal record, Colin can sort one dollar bills, up to four dollars. Colin is unable to make coin combinations to equal one dollar. This affects his ability to calculate and problem solve in the general curriculum as well as in daily life skill activities.

Annual Goal: Given coins (quarter, dime, nickel, penny), Colin will make coin combinations to equal one dollar, in 3 different ways, 9 of 10 trials.
NC Policy 1503-4.1


Title 1/No Child Left Behind requires that students with disabilities assessed through modified achievement standards have annual goals aligned to grade level competencies.

In NC, students in grades 3-8 & 10 who are assessed via the Extend 2 are subject to this requirement.

ESEA 1111(h)
IDEA 612 (a)(15)
Remember!
- LEAs are not prohibited from requiring standards based IEPs for all students.

- While not required to be documented on the IEP for all students, in developing annual goals for all students, consideration must always be given to the state standards set forth in the general education curriculum.

- Connecting the standard to the annual goal maintains high expectations and improves results.
What about Creating Standards-based goals?
- Annual goals in the IEP are statements that describe what a child with a disability can reasonably be expected to accomplish within the duration of the IEP.

- A measurable annual goal is a statement that links directly to the areas of need identified in the present levels of academic achievement and functional performance.
Okay.. Let's get down to business!
For each area needing specially designed instruction, determine the desired level of achievement or outcome for each goal for a student by considering the following:

• Primary concerns stated in the present level of academic
achievement/functional performance.

• Amount of time the student has left in school and the age of
the student.

• Skills needed to progress to the next level of performance.

• Skills needed to achieve transition.

• Behavior and/or skills that will improve with modifications.
What Areas?
• Strengths of the student.

• Concerns of the parent for enhancing the education of her/his child.

• Scope and sequence of the skill, curricular or behavior areas addressed.

• An observable learner performance (what the learner will be doing, a
action).

• Measurable criteria which specify the level at which the student’s
performance will be acceptable (e.g., speed, accuracy, frequency)

•Clustering behaviors or skills that are related. Any important
givens/conditions (when, with what, where)…as applicable.

• The skill/domain area (academic, behavioral, functional).

• A Student’s learning behaviors.

• Special factors.
Always Consider
Characteristics of Measurability:

• Reveals what to do to measure whether the Goal has been accomplished.
• To measure something is to do something.
• Yields the same conclusion if measured by several people.
• A measurable goal allows us to know how much progress has been made since the last measured performance.
• A measurable goal can be measured as written, without additional information.
• Measurable goals contain givens (if necessary), the learner performance, and the criterion (level of performance to be reached).

If you cannot “measure” what is written…then it is not a measurable goal. For example, whether a student can “count to 10 without error” can be readily determined as it is stated. “Will improve counting skills” cannot be assessed without additional information.
What exactly does “measurable” mean?
Unfortunately, IDEA doesn’t define it.C
Frequently used examples of criteria:

• 4 of 5 trials
• 3 consecutive days
• % accuracy

Use of percentage: “The history of how this strange use of percentage began appears to be lost. But we should know not to aspire to have Josh cross the street safely 80% of the time.”

Excerpt taken from: Writing Measurable IEP Goals and Objectives; Bateman & Herr, 2006

“The use of percentage needs to be carefully limited to a narrow range of goals”

Appropriate use of %: Jane will correctly spell 95% of the 6th grade spelling words dictated to her.Inappropriate use of %: Jane will improve her behavior 80% of the time with 90% accuracy.
Criterion or Level of Performance
Clearly Defined, Visible, Countable Behavior

Examples of “observable” behavior:

• Reading Orally
• Dressing One’s Self
• Speaking to Adults Without Vulgarities
• Pointing, Drawing, Identifying, Writing, etc.

Non-Examples of Observable Behavior:

• Becoming Independent
• Respecting Authority
• Enjoying Literature
• Improving, Feeling, Knowing, etc.
Observable... What exactly does that mean?
Measurable Non-Measureable
Let's Compare
Present Level of Academic Achievement
and Functional Performance

A review of informal checklist of social/emotional skills, indicate that Isabel is very social and loves to tease her friends in a playful way. When required to complete tasks, Hope often avoids these tasks by talking with her friends, and it often takes 5-10 verbal prompts to get Hope to begin the task. Once she begins, she almost always completes the tasks. When she is tired she exhibits extreme emotions: uncontrollable giggling, sobbing, and occasional anger, approximately 5 times per week (according to parental and teacher report). This inhibits her progress in the general curriculum, as she needs direct instruction of social skills.

Annual Goal : When required to complete tasks, Isabel will begin the task with a maximum of 3 prompts.

Annual Goal: When Hope is tired, she will apply a replacement behavior in 3 of 4 instances.
Activity #1


A review of speech/language anecdotal log of observations indicate that Star speaks using words and phrases. She does not use
complete sentences or questions when speaking. She responds to greetings appropriately. She doesn’t verbally express herself
to gain others attention. Instead she grabs others and/or their clothing (e.g. hats, jackets) to initiate conversation or join in a
group. These skill deficits affect her ability to communicate within the general education setting and develop appropriate social
skills.

Annual Goal: Given non-instructional activities Star will improve expressive language skills to initiate and/or join in
conversations with others, an average of 3 times per week.

Integrated Goal: Yes
Present Level of Academic Achievement
and Functional Performance
Performance
Clearly Defined, Visible, Countable Behavior

Examples of “observable” behavior:

• Reading Orally
• Dressing One’s Self
• Speaking to Adults Without Vulgarities
• Pointing, Drawing, Identifying, Writing, etc.

Non-Examples of Observable Behavior:

• Becoming Independent
• Respecting Authority
• Enjoying Literature
• Improving, Feeling, Knowing, etc.
Observable... What exactly does that mean?

Jessica plays/engages in a preferential activity by herself for up to 30
minutes based on daily log of observations. She does not initiate play
with her peers, and only plays alongside others when they have toys that
are interesting to her. She often takes those toys rather than asking for
a turn (on average 4 times per day). Jessica’s social skills interfere with
her educational performance and development of relationships to work
and play cooperatively with others.

Annual Goal: When other children are playing, Jessica will ask when
she wants to play with particular toys that others are playing with, 4
out of 5 times.
Present Level of Academic Achievement
and Functional Performance
According to teacher observation/anecdotal records, Logan continues to struggle to create a product about a personal event as it relates to text (Competency 8.1). He has improved his recall of personal events. He has worked on creating text about his personal experience by creating photo journals of events he has participated in. He currently can add one or two words to describe the photo. Relating those events to a text is frustrating for Logan because it is hard for him to make comparisons.

Annual Goal: Given photo journals, Logan will write text to describe the photo using 5 descriptive words 4 of 5 trials.
Present Level of Academic Achievement
& Functional Performance
“The IEP is the heart of the Individuals with Disabilities Education
Act (IDEA), and measurable goals developed from appropriate present
levels of academic achievement and functional performance, are the
heart of each IEP”
~Bateman & Herr
“A Child is the Root of the Heart”
TEAM TALK
B
-TERM
bjectives
enchmarks
AND
For children with disabilities who take alternate assessments aligned to alternate achievement standards, the IEP must include a description of benchmarks or short-term objectives.

Once the IEP team has developed measurable annual goals for a child, the team can develop strategies that will be most effective in realizing those goals and must:Develop either measurable, intermediate steps (short- term objectives), or major milestones (benchmarks) … to monitor progress during the year, and, if appropriate, to revise the IEP consistent with the student’s instructional needs.

NC Policy 1503-4.1(2)(ii)
- Annual goals in the IEP are statements that describe what a child with a disability can reasonably be expected to accomplish within the duration of the IEP.

- A measurable annual goal is a statement that links directly to the areas of need identified in the present levels of academic achievement and functional performance.
Okay.. Let's get down to business!
For each area needing specially designed instruction, determine the desired level of achievement or outcome for each goal for a student by considering the following:

• Primary concerns stated in the present level of academic
achievement/functional performance.

• Amount of time the student has left in school and the age of
the student.

• Skills needed to progress to the next level of performance.

• Skills needed to achieve transition.

• Behavior and/or skills that will improve with modifications.
What Areas?
• Strengths of the student.

• Concerns of the parent for enhancing the education of her/his child.

• Scope and sequence of the skill, curricular or behavior areas addressed.

• An observable learner performance (what the learner will be doing, a
action).

• Measurable criteria which specify the level at which the student’s
performance will be acceptable (e.g., speed, accuracy, frequency)

•Clustering behaviors or skills that are related. Any important
givens/conditions (when, with what, where)…as applicable.

• The skill/domain area (academic, behavioral, functional).

• A Student’s learning behaviors.

• Special factors.
Always Consider
Characteristics of Measurability:

• Reveals what to do to measure whether the Goal has been accomplished.
• To measure something is to do something.
• Yields the same conclusion if measured by several people.
• A measurable goal allows us to know how much progress has been made since the last measured performance.
• A measurable goal can be measured as written, without additional information.
• Measurable goals contain givens (if necessary), the learner performance, and the criterion (level of performance to be reached).

If you cannot “measure” what is written…then it is not a measurable goal. For example, whether a student can “count to 10 without error” can be readily determined as it is stated. “Will improve counting skills” cannot be assessed without additional information.
What exactly does “measurable” mean?
Unfortunately, IDEA doesn’t define it.C
Frequently used examples of criteria:

• 4 of 5 trials
• 3 consecutive days
• % accuracy

Use of percentage: “The history of how this strange use of percentage began appears to be lost. But we should know not to aspire to have Josh cross the street safely 80% of the time.”

Excerpt taken from: Writing Measurable IEP Goals and Objectives; Bateman & Herr, 2006

“The use of percentage needs to be carefully limited to a narrow range of goals”

Appropriate use of %: Jane will correctly spell 95% of the 6th grade spelling words dictated to her.Inappropriate use of %: Jane will improve her behavior 80% of the time with 90% accuracy.
Criterion or Level of Performance
Clearly Defined, Visible, Countable Behavior

Examples of “observable” behavior:

• Reading Orally
• Dressing One’s Self
• Speaking to Adults Without Vulgarities
• Pointing, Drawing, Identifying, Writing, etc.

Non-Examples of Observable Behavior:

• Becoming Independent
• Respecting Authority
• Enjoying Literature
• Improving, Feeling, Knowing, etc.
Observable... What exactly does that mean?
Measurable Non-Measureable
Let's Compare
Present Level of Academic Achievement
and Functional Performance

A review of informal checklist of social/emotional skills, indicate that Isabel is very social and loves to tease her friends in a playful way. When required to complete tasks, Hope often avoids these tasks by talking with her friends, and it often takes 5-10 verbal prompts to get Hope to begin the task. Once she begins, she almost always completes the tasks. When she is tired she exhibits extreme emotions: uncontrollable giggling, sobbing, and occasional anger, approximately 5 times per week (according to parental and teacher report). This inhibits her progress in the general curriculum, as she needs direct instruction of social skills.

Annual Goal : When required to complete tasks, Isabel will begin the task with a maximum of 3 prompts.

Annual Goal: When Hope is tired, she will apply a replacement behavior in 3 of 4 instances.
Activity #1


A review of speech/language anecdotal log of observations indicate that Star speaks using words and phrases. She does not use
complete sentences or questions when speaking. She responds to greetings appropriately. She doesn’t verbally express herself
to gain others attention. Instead she grabs others and/or their clothing (e.g. hats, jackets) to initiate conversation or join in a
group. These skill deficits affect her ability to communicate within the general education setting and develop appropriate social
skills.

Annual Goal: Given non-instructional activities Star will improve expressive language skills to initiate and/or join in
conversations with others, an average of 3 times per week.

Integrated Goal: Yes
Present Level of Academic Achievement
and Functional Performance
hort
S
O
Overview
• Short term objectives (also called IEP objectives) are:

Measurable, intermediate steps between the present levels of educational
performance of a child with a disability and the annual goals that are
established for the child. They are developed based on a logical breakdown of the major components of the annual goals, and can serve as milestones for measuring progress toward meeting the goals.
The 411 on Short Term Objectives
IEP teams may develop benchmarks, … describing the amount of progress
the child is expected to make within specified segments of the year. …

What do benchmarks do?

They:

Establish expected performance levels that allow for regular checks of progress that may coincide with the reporting periods for informing parents of their child’s progress toward achieving the annual goals, and they are the major milestones that the student will demonstrate that will lead to the annual goal. Benchmarks usually designate a target time period for a behavior to occur.
Benchmarks
An IEP team may use either
short term objectives
or
benchmarks
or
a combination of the two
depending on the nature of the
annual goals and
the needs of the child.
Changes to note...
• WHO (Student)
Example: Bill

• WHAT (Target Behavior)
Example: Bill will use decoding strategies with words
in isolation, phrases, and sentences.

• WHEN
Example: Bill will use decoding strategies with words
in isolation, phrases and sentences by 6/1/09.
Benchmark Components
• WHO (Student)
Example: Bill

• WHAT (Target Behavior)
Example: Identify a (appropriate) decoding strategy

• CONDITIONS/CIRCUMSTANCES – WHEN NEEDED
Example: Given one syllable words

• CRITERIA (Level To Indicate Attainment)
Example: 8 of 10 trials
Short-Term Objective Components
Present Level of Academic Achievement
& Functional Performance

A review of informal checklist of social/emotional skills, indicate that Isabel is very social and loves to tease her friends in a playful way. When required to complete tasks, Isabel often avoids these tasks by talking with her friends, and it often takes 5-10 verbal prompts to get Isabel to begin the task. Once she begins, she almost always completes the tasks. When she is tired she exhibits extreme emotions: uncontrollable giggling, sobbing, and occasional anger, approximately 5 times per week (according to parental and teacher report). This inhibits her progress in the general curriculum, as she needs direct instruction of social skills.
Activity # 2
Annual Goal : When required to complete tasks, Isabel will begin the task with a maximum of 3 prompts.

Annual Goal: When Isabel is tired, she will apply a replacement behavior in 3 of 4 instances.

Annual Goal : When required to complete tasks, Isabel will begin the task with a maximum of 3 prompts.

Benchmarks: By November 1, 2012, Isabel will begin a task with no more than 6 prompts.

By February 1, 2013, Isabel will begin a task with no more than 4 prompts.

By April 1, 2013, Isabel will begin a task with no more than 3 prompts.
The rest of the story...
Annual Goal: When Isabel is tired, she will apply a replacement behavior
in 3 of 4 instances.

Short-term Objectives:

1. Given instruction, Isabel will identify 2 replacement
behaviors to use when she is tired, 8 of 10 trials.

2. When Isabel is tired and demonstrates emotional outburst,
she will apply a replacement behavior in 1 of 4 instances.

3. When Isabel is tired and demonstrates emotional outburst, she will
apply a replacement behavior in 2 of 4 instances.
So... Isabel will...
Present Level of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance

A review of speech/language anecdotal log of observations indicate
that Sam speaks using words and phrases. She does not use complete
sentences or questions when speaking. She responds to greetings
appropriately. She does not verbally express herself to gain others
attention. Instead she grabs others and/or their clothing (e.g. hats,
jackets) to initiate conversation or join in a group. These skill deficits
affect her ability to communicate within the general education setting
and develop appropriate social skills.

Annual Goal: Sam will improve expressive language skills to initiate
and/or join in conversations with others, an average of 3 times per week
during non-instructional activities.

Integrated Goal: Yes
How about this...
Annual Goal: Sam will improve expressive language skills to initiate
and/or join in conversations with others, an average of 3 times per
week during non-instructional activities.

Benchmarks:

By October 10, 2012 Sam will join in conversation with others.

By December 10, 2012 Sam will initiate conversation with others.
More about Sam...
Annual Goal: Sam will improve expressive language skills to initiate and/or join in conversations with others, an average of 3 times per week during non-instructional activities.

Short-term Objectives:

Given non-instructional activities, Sam will join in conversation with others 2 times per week.

Given non-instructional activities, Sam will join in conversation with others 3 times per week.

Given non-instructional activities, Sam will initiate conversation with others 2 times per week.

Given non-instructional activities, Sam will initiate conversation with others 3 times per week.
Things to
think about...
Be Specific
IMPORTANT
Special Factors
Student Needs
Informal Assessments
Course of Study
Everything on track? Are we headed in the right direction?
Be Specific
More about Sam...
How important are they...?
Signatures?
Full transcript