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P3 Report explaining electoral process in UK

Government policies P3
by

Lydia Lingley

on 7 October 2015

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Transcript of P3 Report explaining electoral process in UK

P3 Report explaining electoral process in UK
TASK 2 IS A WRITTEN REPORT
Include both words and images to describe each stage of the process.
Who is entitled to stand?
Over 18 years
British, commonwealth or Rep of Ireland citizen
Nominated by 10 registered electors
Authorisation from party or independent
£500 deposit
Cover each point (9)
You may not stand for the general election if....
You are a prisoner serving 12 months or more.
You are a bankrupt.
Candidate selection process

If you are standing as an independent representative there are no candidate selection procedures; as long as you are eligible you may stand for office.

Existing MPs who want to stand for re-election are normally automatically approved.

The political parties often have more potential candidates than they need to fill the seats they are hoping to win. This is when some form of selection procedure becomes necessary to ensure that the best candidate, or the candidate most likely to win the seat, is selected. There are many methods of doing this. One method is that the party selects a list of centrally approved candidates from which the local branch can then choose.


Candidates are decided in a rigorous way which in many ways mirrors the public services selection procedure. They are subject to a paper sift of their CV and application form; there may be a weekend of aptitude tests; they may also undergo a background check.

Another method involves the local branch of the party interviewing the potential candidates to find the one they want to serve their area. Sometimes a party will draw up a shortlist containing only women in order to improve the numbers of women serving in Parliament, but this can be controversial.

Candidate selection
Influence of party system
Political party in power calls the general election ( any time within 5 years).
May therefore reduce taxes just before hand.
2 or 3 big parties will have funds to support candidates.
publicity and electioneering activites
Publicity and electioneering
Door to door canvassing
Posters
Leaflets
T.V
Negative campaigning
Negative campaigning
Can you think of any UK examples?
Representatives
Candidates and parties campaign until polling day. Then it's up to citizens to make up their minds. Every eligible resident gets to cast one vote for a candidate in their local constituency. The candidate with the most votes becomes the local Member of Parliament, or MP, for that area. He or she will represent everyone in the constituency in the House of Commons.
Period of Election
Elections give people a chance to make decisions about how their country is run. Holding free and fair elections is the most important ingredient in making any country a democracy. In the UK, general elections take place in May once every five years, unless Parliament votes to hold an election sooner.
Leafleting
Posters
Canvassing door to door
T.V party political broadcasts
Publicity and Electioneering
Polling office
Booth
Ballot slip
Post
Electronic
Proxy
Voting Processes
MPs are more able to help you with issues that Parliament or government are responsible for, such as:

Tax (but not council tax as this is set and paid to your local authority).

Hospitals and the National Health Service (not local social services).

Benefits, pensions, national insurance.

Immigration.

School closures and grants (not day-to-day school problems like governors or the local education authority).
Voting Systems
http://assets.parliament.uk/education/Interactive-Whiteboard-Resources/IWB_3_2/deploy/iwb_3.html?level=3&activity=3
First past post
single transferable vote
alternative vote
proportional representation
Responsibilities of Elected Bodies
In a written report including a table of comparison, compare the election process of 2 levels of government and show evidence for the points.
M2
Hand in W/C 19/10/15
MPs are more able to help you with issues that Parliament or government are responsible for, such as:

Tax (but not council tax as this is set and paid to your local authority).

Hospitals and the National Health Service (not local social services).

Benefits, pensions, national insurance.

Immigration.

School closures and grants (not day-to-day school problems like governors or the local education authority).
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