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Feminism

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Emily Phillips

on 19 May 2014

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Transcript of Feminism

Feminism
mood
Feminine Mistique
famous feminists
feminism
expectations
reality
Maids and Black Women
opportunities
Betty Friedan
Reasons for Writing It
summary
impacts
Ella Baker
Amelia Bloomer
Robin Morgan
Gloria Steinem
enlightenment
response
Opposition
results
feminist advertisements
World War II
Post World War II
nursing
teaching
social work
stenography
typing
29% of the work force
education = higher wages
women in the 60's were not happy with their lives
why?
women's struggles
Many women dropped out of school to find a husband
housewives did not find satisfaction from their housework
women wanted to do more with their lives
comparing during and post WWII
Sigmund Freud
originally believed in the roll of the housewife
changed to believe that women can do whatever they want
first woman to write a newspaper
The Lily
she had very little education
started in 1849 in Seneca Falls, New York
Elizabeth Cady Stanton
included recipes as well as moralist tracts
Women realized how few rights they were given
women wanted the same rights and opportunities as men, especially the right to vote
housewives knew that they had to do something, they could not stand for this oppression
many women noticed their lack of rights by reading feminist newspapers and books such as feminine mystique
feminist rallies/protests
Miss America protest
150 feminist women came to protest the way the Miss America Pageant portrayed women
Bra Burnings
many women did not actually burn their bras, this was just symbolic.
instead of burning them many feminists would not wear bras in public in order to show their independence.
"We are not beautiful, we are not ugly, we are angry"
"The costume of women should be suited to her wants and necessities. It should conduce at once to her health, comfort, and usefulness; and, while it should not fail also to conduce to her personal adornment, it should make that end of secondary importance."
-Amelia Bloomer
"When you find a burden in belief or apparel, cast it off."
-Amelia Bloomer
Sources
The End
Lowest rung of economic ladder
Received the lowest wages
Low salary was main source of income for their families
Many worked jobs such as a maid and nanny for white households
Maids took care of white children
Men went off to fight in war, so many jobs were open and needed to be done.
Women filled these jobs that were previously considered men's jobs
Men came back from the war and jobs were taken away from the women and given back to men.
Women were only able to obtain low-paying positions; higher positons were given to men
Women's focus was put back on family life.
• "60's All-American Ads - Feminism and Ads." 60's All-American Ads - Feminism and Ads. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Dec. 2013.
• "Betty Friedan Biography." Bio.com. A&E Networks Television, n.d. Web. 16 Dec. 2013.
• "Effects of the Women's Suffrage Movement - Women's Suffrage Movement vs. Women's Rights Movement in the 1800s." Women's Suffrage Movement vs. Women's Rights Movement in the 1800s. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Dec. 2013.
• "Ella Baker." Americans Who Tell the Truth. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2013.
• "Gloria Steinem Biography." Bio.com. A&E Networks Television, n.d. Web. 16 Dec. 2013.
• "Gloria Steinem Biography." Bio.com. A&E Networks Television, n.d. Web. 16 Dec. 2013.
• "Goodbye to All That", 1970 in Going Too Far: The Personal Chronicle of a Feminist, p 123.

• "Lesbianism and Feminism: Synonyms or Contradictions?” in Going Too Far: The Personal Chronicle of a Feminist, p 178.
• "Lesbianism and Feminism: Synonyms or Contradictions?” in Going Too Far: The Personal Chronicle of a Feminist, p 178.
• "Liz Urbic." Liz Urbic. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Dec. 2013.
• "SNCC-People: Ella Baker." SNCC-People: Ella Baker. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Dec. 2013.
• "Women Had Key Roles in Civil Rights Movement." Msnbc.com. NBC News, 29 Oct. 2005. Web. 16 Dec. 2013.
• N.p., n.d. Web. <http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/19/books/50-years-of-reassessing-the-feminine-mystique.html?_r=0>.
• YouTube. YouTube, n.d. Web. 15 Dec. 2013. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded>.

 Stay at home moms
 Worked hard to maintain household
 Couldn’t vote
"I've tried everything—hobbies, gardening, pickling, canning, being very social with my neighbors, joining committees, running PTA teas. I can do it all, and I like it, but it doesn’t leave you anything to think about—any feeling of who you are. I never had any career ambitions. All I wanted was to get married and have four children. I love kids and Bob and my home. There’s no problem you can put a name to. But I’m desperate. I begin to feel I have no personality. I’m a server of food and a putter-on of pants and a bed-maker, somebody who can be called on when you need something. But who am I?”
At that point, feminism was seen as an outdated idea.
She urged women to “stop giving lip service to the idea that there are no battles left to be fought for women in America.”
Women were giving up on rights
She wanted to restart the movement
Believed that women should develop their own talents and potentials
She had an uncommon upbringing where she did not attend a regular school until she was 11 when her parents divorced. She then had to care for her mother who suffered from a mental illness.
She attended Smith’s College where she studied government and uncommon choice for women of the time.

She did not want to end up taking care of people like a typical housewife after she had cared for her mother.
She started a career as a free lance writer where she expressed her feminist views through her writing, some of which were included in the Show magazine

Involved in the creation of the
Ms
feminists magazine in 1971
"Any woman who chooses to behave like a full human being should be warned that the armies of the status quo will treat her as something of a dirty joke. That's their natural and first weapon. She will need her sisterhood."
-Gloria Steinem
FBI saw the feminist movement as "part of the enemy, a challenge to American values."
Believed that it could lead to violence.
Paid female informants across the whole country to infiltrate the women’s movement.
Some believed that women were not being discriminated against and were filling their part in society by conforming to the ideas for an ideal woman that were present in the 50s
Some women were satisfied being housewives.
"60's All-American Ads - Feminism and Ads." 60's All-American Ads - Feminism and Ads. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Dec. 2013.
"Liz Urbic." Liz Urbic. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Dec. 2013.
YouTube. YouTube, n.d. Web. 15 Dec. 2013. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded>.
N.p., n.d. Web. <http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/19/books/50-years-of-reassessing-the-feminine-mystique.html?_r=0>.
"Rosie the Riveter." Rosie the Riveter. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2013. <http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h1656.html>.
"Betty Friedan’s “The Feminine Mystique”: 50 Years of Impact." The McDonough County Voice. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Dec. 2013. <http://www.mcdonoughvoice.com/article/20130316/NEWS/130319309/?tag=2>.
• The overall idea that was portrayed throughout this era is the idea of typical housewives being considered as just someone who does the housework, takes care of the kids, and makes dinner.
• However, throughout the introduction of the feminist movement women all around the world began to take a stand and show that they can have careers outside of their everyday life, which most wives did have during WWII.

• As we look through the different advertisements on the “Perfect housewife” and many others, we can see how women in this time period were completely objectified as people whom were practically slaved by men
• Throughout this time period women began many rallies and other types of campaigns in which they could illustrate to the global and local communities those women should have the same equality as men because they can in fact “Do It.”

• “Over and over women heard the voice of tradition . . . that they could desire no greater destiny than to glory in their own femininity. . . . They learned that truly feminine women do not want careers, higher education, political rights---the independence and opportunities that the old-fashioned feminists had fought for.”
• The book essentially prompted women all around the world to become advocates of personal growth and achievement, beyond the ideals of mother or wife
• Many women after reading Friedan’s book stated: “The book changed my life!”
• The novel impacted the male community as the offensive and they quickly resented the loss of submissive, readily controllable females.

• However some women felt that the novel was too radical to an extent: “Anything beyond a life of service to husband and children seemed to contradict who they were. Hence, some felt that Friedan and other feminist’s denigrated homemakers.”
• “We stopped defining ourselves merely in sexual relation to men, as objects, mothers, wives, housewives, and we discovered a new joy in ourselves and in other women.” In short, women discovered that they were not dependent upon a man for their sense of identity.

• "I feel that "man-hating" is an honorable and viable political act, that the oppressed have a right to class-hatred against the class that is oppressing them."
• “In the long run, Women's Liberation will of course free men -- but in the short run it's going to COST men a lot of privilege, which no one gives up willingly or easily.”
• ” [A] legitimate revolution must be led by, made by those who have been most oppressed: black, brown, yellow, red, and white women —- with men relating to that the best they can.”
• “Sexism is NOT the fault of women -- kill your fathers, not your mothers.”
• ”We can't destroy the inequities between men and women until we destroy marriage.”

• Let's run it on down. White males are most responsible for the destruction of human life and environment on the planet today. Yet who is controlling the supposed revolution to change all that? White males (yes, yes, even with their pasty fingers back in black and brown pies again). It just could make one a bit uneasy. It seems obvious that a legitimate revolution must be led by, made by those who have been most oppressed: black, brown, and white women–with men relating to that as best they can. A genuine Left doesn't consider anyone's suffering irrelevant, or titillating; nor does it function as a microcosm of capitalist economy, with men competing for power and status at the top, and women doing all the work at the bottom (and functioning as objectified prizes or "coin" as well). Goodbye to all that.
o "Goodbye to All That", 1970 in Going Too Far: The Personal Chronicle of a Feminist, p 123.

• Robin Morgan was a poet, novelist, and radical feminist whom greatly viewed the housewives’ oppression as, obviously, completely repulsive
• She wrote fiction/non-fiction

• Child actress
• Editor of a magazine in 1990-1993

• The Rosie the Riveter ad campaign was the typical style of advertisement, grasping the hearts of millions and while doing so lighting the fire in women too pick themselves up from their everyday life and work in real jobs, and take a stand for their beliefs
• The “Rosie” image truly brought the sense of hope back into the lives of women especially in the U.S. and made women realize that there should be a true sense of male to female equality

• The Rosie the Riveter ad campaign was the typical style of advertisement, grasping the hearts of millions and while doing so lighting the fire in women too pick themselves up from their everyday life and work in real jobs, and take a stand for their beliefs
• The “Rosie” image truly brought the sense of hope back into the lives of women especially in the U.S. and made women realize that there should be a true sense of male to female equality

• Essentially the main take away from this particular campaign is the following: With this image the workforce increased by 50%, over half of the workforce consisted of women of all ages, and it essentially drove women of all ages to take a stand and fill in the old jobs that were left behind during WWII
Born February 4, 1921
Attended Smith College, University of California, and Berkeley
Got her bachelors in psychology in 1942
moved to New York in the mid 1940s to become a reporter
Married Carl Friedan in 1947
Had three children
Published Feminine Mystique in 1963.
Co-founded the NOW (National Organization for Women) in 1966.
Died on February 4, 2006 due to heart failure
Said to be one of the leading voices of the women's rights movement during the 20th century
Women now had higher expectations
Started to obtain different professions that were not just the "lousy" jobs. With this their salaries began to increase as well.
Gained a secure place in society
Became closer to complete equality
Born December 13, 1903
African American
Started slave revolts
Attended Shaw University in Raleigh, North Carolina
Graduated in 1927
After graduation moved to New York
1930- joined Young Negroes Cooperative League
1940- became NAAPCP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) field secretary then moved to director of branches. (Worked with NAAPCP 1943-1946)
1957- moved to Atlanta following Martin Luther King.
Helped to create SCLC (Southern Christian Leadership Conference)
Ran a voter registration campaign and also helped with the crusade for citizenship.
Died December 13, 1986 in New York City due to natural causes.
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