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Repairing Sentence Fragments

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by

Ricardo Mayén

on 7 July 2015

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Transcript of Repairing Sentence Fragments

1. It needs to begin with a capital letter.
Fragment With no
Subject and/or Verb
How to fix it:
1.Connecting the fragment.
Remove the period and the following capital letter.
Example-
A prize was awarded to Ed. The hardest worker in the class.
A Dependent Clause Fragment
A dependent clause starts with a word that makes it subordinate and dependent on another clause.
A Fragment With a Missing Subject After
and
,
but
, or
or
Remember that two separate sentences need two separate subjects.
Example-
Ed waited outside the classroom. And hoped the fire alarm would stop.
Intentional Fragments
Used in academic writing for...
Emphasizing the explanation of a question.
A point of transition.
Quiz!
Repairing Sentence Fragments
2. Revise the two sentences so that they both have a subject and a verb.
Example-
ED is trying to get a good grade. Is wise for him to avoid things that will distract him.
Dependent Words
after
although
as
because
before
even though
how
if, even if
in order that
since
that, so that
unless
until
what, whatever
when, whenever
where, wherever
whether
which, whichever
while
who, whoever
whose
2. Delete the subordinating conjunction.
Makes it a dependent clause.
Example-
Since the fire alarm rang.
1. Ed waited outside the classroom, and
hoped the fire alarm would stop.
1. My family and I live a simple life. on our farm in California.
2. Language classes are difficult. especially when taken in summer school.
3. Which kept me from finishing my journal entry.
4. On the desk between my computer and golfing trophy.
5. After an hour, the dancers changed partners. And easily adapted from rock and roll to the tango.
1. I know a guy named Ed.
How to fix a Dependent Clause
1. Connect it to an independent clause.
Before or after
Example-
While Ed wrote in his journal.
Sentence Examples
"Fragment With ..." Continued
"How to Fix..." Continued
Ed is trying to get a good grade. It
is wise for him to avoid things
that will distract him.
A prize was awarded to Ed, the hardest worker in the
class.
While Ed wrote in his journal, the fire alarm
rang.
The fire alarm rang.
What a Sentence Needs
2. It needs an independent (main) clause.
A subject and a complete verb
3. Has to have the right end punctuation.
Period, question mark, exclamation point, or semicolon
2. Ed goes to school with me.
3. Ed loves to go to school!
2. Ed waited outside the classroom. He
hoped the fire alarm would stop.
Examples of an Intentional Fragment in Academic Writing
Man is the only animal that blushes. Or needs to. -Mark Twain,
Following the Equator
He
[Dylan Thomas]
lived twenty-four years after he began to be a poet. Twenty-four years of poetry, dwindling rapidly in the last decade.-Donald Hall,
Remembering Poets
Example in
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