Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Speech 1318 chapter 7

No description
by

Connor Lyons

on 22 October 2012

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Speech 1318 chapter 7

Elements in the Listening Process Types of Listening Responses Hearing Attending Understanding Responding Remembering Prompting Questioning Paraphrasing Supporting Analyzing Advising Judging Prompting is the act of nudging the speaker back into speaking.

For example, by when the speaker looks for feedback you don't want to give, you can be silent or give brief encouraging statements to spur the speaker back into talking. Definition:The physiological dimension of listening Questioning is asking for clarification or additional information. Definition: psychological process of what we hear and what we dont.

For example, if your friend tells you about a movie he just saw, you will pay more attention if you plan on going to see it.

Attending doesn't only benefit the receiver. If you paid attention while your friend recounted the movie, studies show he will be able to recall more details about it. Benefits of questioning:
Fast way for the asker to gain information
Prompts the speaker to think critically about the subject
Encourages the speaker to use self-discovery Definition: when we make sense of a message.

Understanding is the amount of information we correctly decode.
Researchers use the term "Listening Fidelity" to describe the difference between what was understood and what the sender was trying to communicate. Definition: Giving observable feedback to a speaker.

Responding can be verbal and nonverbal. Some responses are:
Eye contact with speaker
Verbal feedback
Proper reaction with facial expressions Types of questions:
Sincere Questions- Questions that are aimed at understanding
Counterfeit Questions- Questions that aim to send a message, not receive one. Factors that influence hearing Background Noise-other noises at the same frequency we are trying to here.
Auditory Fatigue-temporary loss of hearing caused by continuous exposure to the same tone. Hearing: it is the process i which sound waves strike the eardrum and cause vibrations that ware transmitted to the brain. Listening: occurs when the brain reconstructs these electrochemical impulses into a representation of the original sound and gives them meaning. Hearing is not automatic. We Unconsciously block out annoying sounds and we also stop listening when we find a subject uninteresting or unimportant Paraphrasing is repeating information in your own words. This is done for clarification, as well as to assure the speaker that you are actively listening and understanding.

There are two types of paraphrasing.
Factual information: Paraphrasing factual information is done for clarification. If you don't understand something (i.e. directions) you can paraphrase the information given to you to make sure it's correct
Personal Information: Paraphrasing personal information is done to bring about a clear understanding of the issue or defuse an argument. Mindless listening occurs when when we react to others messages automatically Hearing VS Listening Mindless Listening Supporting is just that. Agreeing with and supporting the speaker. Oftentimes, support should be used to sympathize and lift up a crestfallen speaker.

There are several types of supportive feedback.
These are Empathy, Agreement, Praise, Reassurance and offering to help. Mindful Listening Mindful listening involves careful and thoughtful attention and responses to the messages we receive. Analyzing is synthesizing and interpreting the information, then offering your conclusion.

Problems with analyzing
Analysis may be incorrect
Analysis, even though it may be true, could offend the speaker.
Solutions
Offer analysis tentatively, rather than as fact.
Make sure speaker will be receptive before offering your interpretation
Be sure your analysis is constructive Advising sharing knowledge and experience with the speaker on a particular subject. However, studies have shown that advising is harmful as often as it's helpful.

When and how should you give advise?

Be sure the advise is asked for. Unsolicited advise can discredit what you have to say, even if it's true.

Make sure it's advice on a subject in which are you familiar with. By giving counsel on something that you aren't 100% on, you run the risk of making things worse.

Are you sensitive towards their situation? Nobody likes being told what to do. You don't want to seem inconsiderate or belittling. Judging is giving input on an action or opinion. It can be both good or bad.

For example, "Good idea" and "That's not going to get you anywhere" are both examples of judging.

Judgements will have a higher chance of being received if they conform to these two criteria:
The person you are passing judgement on requested it
The intent of the judgement is purely constructive Choosing a Listening Response The best response varies from situation to situation.

Some factors include
Gender
People involved
Person
Personality Listening Defined Definition: Ability to recall information.

Remembering and information is essential. Studies suggest that we only remember 50% of what we hear right after hearing it. After 8 hours that number drops to 35%, and after 2 months 25%.

Attending and understanding are key in remembering information. Chapter 7

Listening: More than meets the ear

Brandon Bledsoe
Connor Lyons
Lonny Masterson
Henry McQuilling Listening Defined
Elements of the Listening Process
Challenges of Listening
Types of Listening Responses Topics For Today The Challenge of Listening Hearing baleeted
Responding The Challenge of Listening Definition:The physiological dimension of listening Definition: psychological process of what we hear and what we dont.

For example, if your friend tells you about a movie he just saw, you will pay more attention if you plan on going to see it.

Attending doesn't only benefit the receiver. If you paid attention while your friend recounted the movie, studies show he will be able to recall more details about it. Now we know some different ways to listen ineffectively, what causes people to listen poorly?

1. Message Overload
2. Preoccupation
3. Rapid Thought
4. Effort
5. External Noise
6. Faulty Assumptions
7. Lack of apparent advantages
8. Lack of Training
9. Hearing Problems Definition: a message consists of giving observable feedback.

Responding can be verbal and nonverbal. Some responses are:
Eye contact with speaker
Verbal feedback
Proper reaction with facial expressions Factors that influence hearing Background Noise-other noises at the same frequency we are trying to here.
Auditory Fatigue-temporary loss of hearing caused by continuous exposure to the same tone.






Even if the message is relayed perfectly, it can still fail to be communicated if the receiver is listening poorly

Different kinds of communication challenges


Why do we listen poorly?


How we can improve our listening 1. Pseudolistening is an imitation of listening, giving the appearance to the speaker that you are paying attention. Even though it may appear the listener is engaged in the conversation, they aren't even trying to process the information
1. Pseudolistening Stage-Hogging is where the listener tries to shift the focus of the conversation to another topic. Frequent interruptions are common with stage-hogs. 2. Stage-Hogging Selective listeners only pay attention when they hear something in a conversation that interests them. This can result in a lot of miscommunication. 3. Selective Listening Instead of only paying attention when they hear something that interests them, Insulated listeners will simply stop listening if they don't want to deal with a topic 4. Insulated Listening Defensive listening is when the listener takes remarks as personal attacks, or otherwise becomes offended by a message. When a listener is offended they can't listen very well. 5. Defensive Listeners Ambushing is a form of listening in which the listener is thinking about how they can disprove or refute you. This is very distracting to the listener and will not allow them to understand the message well 6. Ambushing Insensitive listening occurs when the speaker is trying to convey a deeper message, but the listener misinterprets it to have a more superficial meaning. 5. Insensitive Listening Why don't we listen better? It can be very difficult for a listener to understand important messages if they are overwhelmed by trivial ones. 1. Message Overload If the listener is focused on something else, they will not be able to effectively listen. 2. Preoccupation If a listener gets bored during a conversation, they tend to start thinking about something else, not related to the conversation at hand. 3. Rapid Thought 4. Effort Listening can be very difficult, and if the listener is exhausted, the message might not be able to be communicated well. It may be very difficult to listen to a speaker if you're in a loud, or otherwise uncomfortable environment. 5. External noise This can happen when the listener thinks he already knows what the speaker is saying, and doesn't feel the need to listen. 6. Faulty Assumptions When the listener doesn't see the value in listening to the speaker. This can be because they think they have a better idea, they think they know what they're going to say, ect. 7. Lack of Apparent Advantages Sometimes the listener is doing their best, but they simply don't know good listening practices. Many assume that listening is not something they need to learn, when in fact it would benefit them greatly. 8. Lack of Training Other times, the problems in communication can be caused by the listener physically being impaired. If they are having trouble even hearing what you are saying it can be difficult to relay a message. 9. Hearing Problems Needs Wants Desires
Interests Bad Listener Good Listener
Full transcript