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Composed Upon Westminster Bridge

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by

Casie Barnett

on 24 September 2013

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Transcript of Composed Upon Westminster Bridge

Composed Upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802
Composed Upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802
By: William Wordsworth
Earth has not anything to show more fair:
Dull would he be of soul who could pass by
A sight so touching in its majesty:
This City now doth, like a garment, wear
The beauty of the morning, silent, bare,
Ships, towers, domes, theatres, and temples lie
Open unto the fields, and to the sky;
All bright and glittering in the smokeless air.
Never did sun more beautifully steep
In his first spendour, valley, rock, or hill;
Ne'er saw I, never felt, a calm so deep!
The river glideth at his own sweet will:
Dear God! the very houses seem asleep;
And all that mighty heart is lying still!
Theme
Lines 9-11
Never did sun more beautifully steep
In his first spledour, valley, rock, or hill;
Ne'er saw I, never felt, a calm so deep!
The river glideth at his own sweet will:
Dear God! the very houses seem asleep;
And all that mighty heart is lying still!

Lines 12-14
personification
interjection
right before city rises
* awe and
amazement
* The speaker is
cativated
by the beauty of London
* His believes that whoever doesn't take the time to enjoy the view are just foolish,
"Dull"
* Enjoy the wonders of the world because they are
ephemeral

Speaker
- amazed by the city
Imagery
- morning lights creates
beauty that hasn't been seen before
Figurative Language
Metaphor- London to nature

Earth has not anything to show more fair:
Dull would he be of soul who could pass by
A sigh so touching in its majesty
This City now doth, like a garment, wear
The beauty of the morning, silent, bare
Hyperbole- world seems new. Wordsworth lived in Lake District
Contrast: Dull and majesty
"Dull" person can't appreciate the beauty of city
Paradox: touching is personal and majesty is public
Personification: city is wearing a garment
Irony of wordchoice: garment
Lines 1-5
Prezi by:
Casie, Izabella, Sam and Vanessa
The End
About the Author: William Wordsworth
Key figure in Romanticism, world was too busy and fast-paced
Invented new type of poetry- depicted nature and the common man
Lived in Lake District London
Emerson wrote "Wordsworth did more for the sanity of this generation than any other writer."
Written by:
William Wordsworth
Ships, towers, domes, theatres and temples lie
Open unto the fields, and to the sky;
All bright and glittering in the smokeless air.
Lines 6-8
Imagery- makes London seem almost heavenly
irony; cities are usually smoky from factory fumes, etc.
Man-made objects and structures can be beautiful
Normally have problem and solution, this sonnet is mainly observations and a realization of the beauty of London
We can assume the speaker is William Wordsworth due to the fact that he had been in London days before this was written and his journal of notes.
Full transcript