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TEACHING CLIL USING

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on 18 October 2014

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Transcript of TEACHING CLIL USING

1. Bilingualism And Bilingual Education
1.1. Different Perceptions Of Bilingual Education
2. Content And Language Integrated Learning (Clil)
2.1. An Approach To The Acronym And The Concept
2.2. A Definition Of Clil
2.3. Clil Variants
2.4. Clil And Current Practice
3. Clil Essentials
3.1. Clil Foundation Pieces
3.2. Clil Core Features
3.3. Clil, Content, Communication, Community And Cognition
3.4. Language Learning In The Clil Classroom
3.5. Creative And Critical Thinking In The Clil Classroom
3.6. Learning Styles
4. Clil Implementation
4.1. Reasons For Clil Implementation
4.2. Clil Implementation In Europe
5. Clil Impact On Efl
6. Reflecting On Learning
7. Clil Dimensions
7.1. The Language Dimension
7.1.1 Improve Overall Target Competence
7.1.2 Develop Oral Communication Skills
7.1.3 Deepen Awareness Of Both Mother Tongue & Target Language
7.1.4 Develop Plurilingual Interests And Attitudes
7.1.5 Introduce A Target Language


TEACHING CLIL
METHODOLOGY
USING
CLIL METHODOLOGY

narrator
,
nickname
,
nightmare
,
nobility
,
nod
,
noise
,
What words start with the letter 'n'?
nation
,
native
,
necklace
,
needle
,
neighbor
,
nephew
,
nest
,
neutrality
,
newlywed
,
newspaper
,
name
,
nap
,
napkin
,
nucleus
,
nudge
,
nudist
,
nuisance
,
number
,
nurse
,
nursery
,
nurture
,
nut
,
nutrition
,
nutshell
.

nonconformist
,
north
,
novel
,
nowhere
,
nozzle
,
nuance
What has many circles...
.
...a nucleus made up of dots..
.
.
..actually, there are dots everywhere..
.
So...let's put it all together...
CLIL Core Features:
Multiple Focus
Safe and Enriching Learning Environment
Authenticity
Active Learning
Scaffolding
Co-operation
supporting language learning in content classes
supporting content learning in language classes
integrating several subjects
organizing learning through cross-curricular themes and projects
supporting reflection on the learning process (cognition)

using routine activities and discourse
displaying language and content throughout the classroom
building student confidence to experiment with language and content
using classroom learning centres (such as the maths corner, the science corner...)
guiding access to authentic learning materials and environments
increasing student language awareness

letting the students ask for the language help they need
maximizing the accommodation of student interests ( e.g. in the selection of the topics, tasks...)
making a regular connection between learning and the students' lives (e.g. personalizing the tasks)
connecting with other speakers of the CLIL language(e.g. participating in Comenius projects which include mathematical tasks)
using current materials from the media and other sources ( coins, dices, on-line games, etc.)

students communicating more than the teacher (verbalization of procedures)
students help set content, language and learning skills outcomes
students evaluate progress in achieving learning outcomes
favouring peer co-operative work( pair work, group work, whole class)
negotiating the meaning of language and content with students
teachers acting as facilitators

building on a student's existing knowledge, skills, attitudes, interests and experience
repackaging information in user-friendly ways (use of graphics, manipulatives,etc)
responding to different learning styles (visual, kinesthetic, verbal...)
fostering creative and critical thinking (e.g. in problem solving)
challenging students to take another step forward and not just to coast in comfort (e.g. thinking of a different way of solving a problem)

planning courses/lessons/themes in co-operation with CLIL and non-CLIL teachers. (e.g. through a Comenius project)
involving parents in learning about CLIL and how to support students (e.g. with meaningful homework)
involving the local community, authorities and employers (e.g. with a project studying geometry in public buildings)

...the difference between things is the number and the combination of dots in the atoms!!!
Everything is made up of atoms...
...and is in EVERYTHING??????????!!!!!!!!!!!
What else do we do with circles?
YCFCIAGDF TLGHDVCEI CB IEV EIFO AEEL KEM ACKVTL BVGLTIVB, EM BVGLTIVB CI ACKVTL DIL VDFTIVTL ZMEAMDNNB, YGV DFBE AEEL KEM BVGLTIVB CI BZTHCDF TLGHDVCEI EM XCVS BZTHCDF TLGHDVCEIDF ITTLB, BCIHT YCFCIAGDF CILCPCLGDLB TI
J
EO HEAICVCPT DIL BEHCDF DLPDIVDATB EPTM NEIEFCIAGDFB: CI D NGFVCFCIAGDF XEMFL CV CB EYPCEGBFO NEMT TKKCHCTIV DIL MDVCEIDF VE YT ZFGMCFCIGDF VSDI IEV.
Bilingual education is not only good for gifted students, or students in gifted and talented programmes, but also good for students in special education or with special educational needs, since bilingual individuals enjoy cognitive and social advantages over monolinguals: In a multilingual world it is obviously more efficient and rational
to be plurilingual than not.
With a partner, decipher the code. Decide who is going to take which part of the paragraph, or how you're going to work together to finish the work quickly and efficiently.
In
The Education of Karl Witte
, Pastor Witte emphasizes the importance of not just working efficiently but working quickly. He insisted this was of great use to his son as it gave his mind an unusual quickness of perception and in the end Karl did things better and more thoroughly than others.
Which CLIL concepts do these projects represent?

Read: and discuss with your partner which one best fits which project.
https://narrable.com/app#narrables/v7ckck

With your partner read the five paragraphs and decide which concepts apply to the five projects we've just seen.
Read one of the paragraphs on pages 4-5 of your handouts with your partner and summarize it in one (1) sentence.
The small humans look very happy when they are hitting and catching the ball.
We understand that it is ‘good behaviour’ when they smile and say nice things to each other when they play, and encourage each other.

We would like to play when we
return to our planet.

End Report

Report 1 continued:
‘good behaviour’

The small humans get angry if one of the players misses the ball, but we have observed that the worst is when the other players laugh at the person who missed the ball, or when they say mean things to the people on the other tea, or to their own teamsmates. :



We understand that they call it ‘bad behaviour’ when they yell and scream at each other or when they laugh at the team who loses.

Report 1 continued:
‘bad behaviour’

We have been asked to go to Earth to describe some of the things these humans do.

Here is Report 1 to High Command about our observations…..




Our task:

Report title:
Strange behaviour observed
on Earth:
‘Volleyball’


REPORT TO HIGH COMMAND


This is an activity which we have seen in most countries on this planet, but we see it most popular in the following two countries:

Report 1 continued:
(countries)

Most of the time we see six people on each side of the net, but sometimes there are only two. As game with only two people on each side looks like this:

They must try to block the ball from going over the net. This is called ‘blocking.’ It looks like this:

Report 1 continued:
(movements 2)

When they jump up and hit the ball with one hand it is called a ‘serve’. It looks like this:

When they look up and push the ball with the fingers of both hands, it is called a ‘set’. It looks like this:

We have heard that when they put their hands and wrists together to hit the ball, it is called a ‘bump’. It looks like this:

The humans practice hitting the ball different ways.

Report 1 continued:
(movements 1)

On the ‘court’ there is a net that looks like this:

On this ‘court’, they play will balls that look like this:

We see humans playing together on a place that is called a ‘court’. This is what it looks like:

Report 1 to High Command: (equipment)


















3. MINIBOOKS!!!
So...what are some ways that we can teach all this information in fun and effective ways?

Let's go through some ideas...

1. DECIPHERING
2. ALIENS' OBSERVATIONS OF EARTH
4. DIGITAL STORYTELLING
5. WORDLESS BOOKS
What kinds of activities do we need to do
before
reading this story to help our students understand it?
So...how do we create a CLIL lesson? Instead of reading about it - let's all do it together...
Let's say that we're going to create a lesson for 11-12 year olds. While I'm reading this story, think about how we could help an 11 or 12 year old understand this story. What would we need to teach beforehand?
Thank you very much for your participation
!
Donna Lee Fields
Universidad Internacional de Valencia
delfinesplaya@gmail.com
The magnetic element in headphones is typically composed of ferrite or neodymium. Ferrite: helps to prevent high frequency electrical noise (radio frequency interference) from exiting or entering the equipment.
Language learning is included in content classes. This means repackaging information in a manner that facilitates understanding. Charts, diagrams, drawings, hands-on experiments and the drawing out of key concepts and terminology are all common CLIL strategies.
CLIL ESSENTIALS
Thinking drives the teaching learning process. The more powerful the thinking the greater the learning. CLIL supports holistic development of learners. Its ultimate goal is to guide students becoming more capable motivated bilingual or multilingual independent learners.

Long-term retention usually requires that we experience the application of new knowledge and the use of related skills in a meaningful context.
CLIL CONTENT, COMMUNICATION, COMMUNITY AND COGNITION
Where do we see dots?
Tantalum plays a large role in making personal electronic devices smaller, and it naturally fights corrosion.

Tantalum resources funded portions of the Second Congo War, the bloodiest conflict since World War II.
Components of a cell phone
C
H
What is at the center of a circle?
O
To review:
What circles do we have all around us?
Where else do we see circles?
What words begin with the letter 'n'?
nation
,
native
,
necklace
,
needle
,
neighbor
,
nephew
,
nest
,
Where do we see dots?
Let's put it all together...
8. Supporting Language Learning In Content Classes
8.1. Content-Compatible And Content-Obligatory Language
8.2. Essential Elements In Supporting Language Learning In Content Classes
8.3. Giving Students Opportunities To Lead Conversations
8.4. Improving Clarity Of Speech
9. Methodological Considerations On Clil
9.1. The Clil Approach As Compared To Traditional Language And Content Teaching Approaches
9.2. Contribution Of Applied Linguistics
10. Language Acquisition And Language Learning
10.1. Conceptual Differences
10.2. Similarities Between First Language And Second Language Acquisition
10.3. Interlanguage
10.4. Learners’ Errors
10.5. Developmental Sequences
11. Bics And Calp
11.1. Origins Of The Bics/Calp Distinction
12. Defining And Developing Academic English Language
12.1. Academic Language
12.1.1 Explicit Teaching
12.1.2 Building Background Knowledge
12.1.3 Comprehensible Input
12.1.4 Opportunities For Practice
13. Classroom Discourse
13.1. Texts And Varieties
13.2. Registers And Genres In Academic Contexts


Minibook- Teaching History through Literature
Digital Storytelling - Teaching Culture through Songs
Narrable - Using wordless books
Report to High Command - Teaching Physical Education through imagination
By concentrating on solving problems that require critical thinking and co-operation with small groups of peers, students become more engaged and interested.
1. Bilingualism And Bilingual Education
1.1. Different Perceptions Of Bilingual Education
2. Content And Language Integrated Learning (Clil)
2.1. An Approach To The Acronym And The Concept
2.2. A Definition Of Clil
2.3. Clil Variants
2.4. Clil And Current Practice
3. Clil Essentials
3.1. Clil Foundation Pieces
3.2. Clil Core Features
3.3. Clil, Content, Communication, Community And Cognition
3.4. Language Learning In The Clil Classroom
3.5. Creative And Critical Thinking In The Clil Classroom
3.6. Learning Styles
4. Clil Implementation
4.1. Reasons For Clil Implementation
4.2. Clil Implementation In Europe
5. Clil Impact On Efl
6. Reflecting On Learning
7. Clil Dimensions
7.1. The Language Dimension
7.1.1 Improve Overall Target Competence
7.1.2 Develop Oral Communication Skills
7.1.3 Deepen Awareness Of Both Mother Tongue & Target Language
7.1.4 Develop Plurilingual Interests And Attitudes
7.1.5 Introduce A Target Language


8. Supporting Language Learning In Content Classes
8.1. Content-Compatible And Content-Obligatory Language
8.2. Essential Elements In Supporting Language Learning In Content Classes
8.3. Giving Students Opportunities To Lead Conversations
8.4. Improving Clarity Of Speech
9. Methodological Considerations On Clil
9.1. The Clil Approach As Compared To Traditional Language And Content Teaching Approaches
9.2. Contribution Of Applied Linguistics
10. Language Acquisition And Language Learning
10.1. Conceptual Differences
10.2. Similarities Between First Language And Second Language Acquisition
10.3. Interlanguage
10.4. Learners’ Errors
10.5. Developmental Sequences
11. Bics And Calp
11.1. Origins Of The Bics/Calp Distinction
12. Defining And Developing Academic English Language
12.1. Academic Language
12.1.1 Explicit Teaching
12.1.2 Building Background Knowledge
12.1.3 Comprehensible Input
12.1.4 Opportunities For Practice
13. Classroom Discourse
13.1. Texts And Varieties
13.2. Registers And Genres In Academic Contexts


thirty-two,
one thousand twenty-four,
two thousand forty-eight,...
A plethora of circles.

Gold
Au
Titanium
Ti
Hydrogen
Oxygen
Carbon
skin:
Na
Mg
Ca
K
Major elements:

Sodium
Magnesium
Calcium
Potassium
Wine
Which of the six (6) core features of CLIL have we already addressed in the lesson we just experienced?
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