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Multiplication

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by

Jessica Coles

on 2 April 2014

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Transcript of Multiplication

Multiplication
Introduction
3 multiplied by 4
Repeated Addition
Repeated Addition is when you add the same number multiple times in order to find the answer to a multiplication problem, for example 5 x 3 = 3 + 3 + 3 + 3 + 3 = 15.
Arrays
Equal-Groups
3 times 4
3 fours
3 by 4
4 by 3
4 threes
3 'timesed by' 4
Arrays are used in multiplication as it shows a great visual to represent how multiplication can be shown as repeated addition. In maths an array refers to a set of numbers or objects that follow a specific pattern.
Usually the first method introduced to children when they start learning multiplication

Visual representation of repeated addition
Commutative Law/Property
In addition and multiplication you can swap the factors around and still get the same product
Number Line with Cuisenaire Rods
Jumps on a Number Line
Conclusion
3 x 4
4
8
12
4
4
4
http://www.topmarks.co.uk/Flash.aspx?f=Spinners
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2151403/The-iPad-generation-Pupils-young-taught-lessons-touchscreen.html
http://www.maththings.net/MultiplicationandDivision.htm
http://crabtreeyear2.blogspot.co.uk/2011_11_01_archive.html
3 x 4 = 12
Even
Odd
3 x 4
2 x 6
1 x 12
Exploring Factors
Full transcript