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Grammar Boot Camp #3, part 2: Preopisitions, Phrases, and Modifiers, Oh My!

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by

Kaley Keene

on 28 September 2016

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Transcript of Grammar Boot Camp #3, part 2: Preopisitions, Phrases, and Modifiers, Oh My!

Phrases
Unlinke clauses, phrases do not have subjects or verbs in them.

They tend to give more detail to a sentence; they breathe life into it.
Common Prepositions
About, Above, Across,
After
*, Among, Around,
As
*, At, Because of,
Before
*, Behind, Below, Beneath, Beside, Between, By, During, Except,
For
***, From, In, In spite of, Into,
Like
**, Near, Of, On, Onto, Over, Past,
Since
**, Through, Till, To, Toward, Under, Until*, Up, Upon, With, Without,


Examples
I fell
onto
the bed.

I haven't been feeling well
since
yesterday.

Between
you and me, that girl is weird.
Verbal Phrase Examples
The dog,
peeing on your shoe
, is mine. - present participial phrase

Angered by her final grade
, she confronted the professor. - past participial phrase

To do
yoga in the morning is a great way to awaken the body. - infinitive phrase
Remember!
Verbal phrases do not contain verbs! They contain verbals.

example:
Saddened
after a terrible break up, the young girl
went
shopping with her friend in an effort to cheer herself up.
Grammar Boot Camp
#3, part 2
Prepositions, Phrases, and Modifiers, Oh My!

By SL. Kaley Keene
Bold= preposition
"Saddened" is your verbal, and "went" is your verb. See the difference?
* These words are sometimes used as prepositions and sometimes as subordinating conjunctions.
** This word,
like
, can also be a verb as in "I really like you." When used as a preposition,
like
means similar to as in "She smells like roses."
*** This word,
for
, can also be used as a coordinating conjunction, which connects two clauses.
Full transcript