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World Geography: Common Assessment Follow-Up

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Steve Simpson

on 28 January 2013

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Transcript of World Geography: Common Assessment Follow-Up

Double click anywhere & add an idea H. Lynn Erickson World geography:
Common Assessment Follow-Up Tuesday, November 30, 2010 Introductions: Steve Simpson Please tell us your name, your campus, and one thing that you enjoy about teaching World Geography. World geography today's agenda Welcome / Introductions
Common Assessment Data Analysis
Academic Vocabulary Strategies
Student Interaction
Teaching to Concepts
Test Taking Strategies Erickson's Pyramid:
The Structure of Knowledge our organizational chart "Unless teachers consciously identify (enduring) understandings, they focus on the fact-based content as the endpoint of instruction, and the conceptual level of understanding is usually not addressed." A concept is an organizing idea that is:
Timeless
Universal
Abstract
Represented by one or two words
Examples share common atrributes Examples include:
Culture
Migration
Interdependence
Diffusion Generalizations (a.k.a. enduring understandings) are summaries of thought that involve two or more concepts in a relationship.

They develop deeper student understanding. H. Lynn Erickson "When we teach to the levels of concepts and generalizations we are teaching for deep understanding and the transfer of knowledge." H. Lynn Erickson Critical reminders The World Geography End of Course Exam becomes very real for teachers and students in just a matter of months. As a result, we continue to prepare . . . This year, Common Assessments are intended to prepare TEACHERS, not students, for what is coming. Common Assessment questions are based directly off material available to every teacher in the AISD World Geography curriculum document. Preparing for EOC is difficult for all the parties involved (students, teachers, curriculum staff, etc.) why? If knowledge is power, we're working to restore
power as quickly as possible . . .
TEA has still not released all relevant and necessary EOC information
Many questions remained unanswered by TEA and the Education Commissioner

Additionally, this is unfamiliar territory for many World Geography teachers who have not faced state assessment expectations & pressures in the past.

Of course, the stakes are highest for the students themselves. Ten Thematic Strands in Social Studies Culture Cultures are systems of beliefs, knowledge, values and traditions that are dynamic and ever-changing. UNIVERSAL
GENERALIZATIONS TIME, CONTINUITY, AND CHANGE Historical perspective allows humans to identify how the world has changed in the past and how it might change in the future. PEOPLE, PLACES, AND ENVIRONMENTS Human behavior is shaped by physical and cultural environments. individual development and identity Identity and behavior are shaped by culture, groups, and institutions. individuals, groups, and institutions Institutions change over time, promote social conformity, and influence culture. power, authority, and governance Various political systems have been developed over time to manage conflict and establish order. production, distribution, and consumption Because there are limited economic resources to satisfy unlimited human wants, economic systems are created to manage the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services. science, technology, and society Technological and scientific advances often improve human's standard of living, but also raise complex questions related to human values and behavior. global connections Humans inhabit societies that are increasingly shaped by global interdependence and interaction. civic ideals and practices A citizen's full participation in a democratic society requires an understanding of civic ideals and practices of citizenship. Based upon the new TEKS, Course Generalizations have been written that fall under the Universal Generalizations. Where these generalizations come together in the classroom is in the topical generalizations that connect the concepts and details of a topic to the larger course and UNIVERSAL generalizations it is at this level that CONNECTIONS ARE MADE FOR THE STUDENTS SITTING IN AISD CLASSROOMS / THIS IS WHERE RELEVANCE, PRIOR KNOWLEDGE, AND CROSS-COURSE CONNECTIONS MUST BE MADE Unit 4: Europe,
TOPic 3:
Changing poltical
boundaries tOPICAL GENERALIZATIONS EXIST WHERE THEY MOST EFFECTIVELY AND APPROPRIATELY SUPPORT COURSE AND UNIVERSAL GENERALIZATIONS Historical perspective allows humans
to identify how the world
has changed in the past and how
it might change in the future. Historically, people, places, and environments change over time. As a result of political, ethnic, and/or religious conflict, many European
political borders changed over the course of the 20th century. what about concepts? UNIVERSAL generalization course generalization topical generalization concepts:
Balkanization
Ethnic Cleansing
formal region
perceptual region what about topics? War World I Changing political boundaries and, of course, the facts . . . In the 1990s, Yugoslavia was broken apart by ethnic and religious conflict
Four countries emerged out of what had been Yugoslavia
Currently, the status of Kosovo and its claim to independence from Serbia is still a matter of debate . . . the balkan conflict if a student only learns these facts,
we have not done our job very well however, if students learn such facts in the context of understanding why Political boundaries have shifted in the past (and how they will likely shift in the future), it is significant, relevant, meaningful, and is much more likely to be retained over time So, how do these elements appear in the curriculum document? ITEM ANALYSIS With your shoulder partner,
you're going to use copies of
Common Asssessments 1 & 2
and the District Item Analysis
data retrieved from Polaris
to identify needs / gaps in our
collective instruction. With your partner, please identify the following:
Most challenging questions
Possible reasons that the questions were answered incorrectly
Categories or patterns of concern General Observations:
Students struggled with questions related to the technical, academic language of the course
Students have a surface understanding of demography & key indicators Most Challenging Questions? categories of concern: Vocabulary acquisition MARZANO FRAYER FOUR
CORNERS WORD
WALL Six Step Process:
Provide a description, explanation, and/or example of the new term
Students restate the definition in their own words
Students construct a picture, symbol, or graphic that represents the term
Build
Review
Play Student writes:
The term
The definition
Characteristics
Examples
Non-examples Student writes:
The term
The definition
A sentence
An illustration A collection of academic vocabulary terms
(paired with illustrations)
posted in a classroom and organized by topic Which to choose? Why not take the best
components of each and synthesize them together into a new method? Students must construct their own meaning
Students are visual learners
Students need the opportunity to collaborate Keys to consider: A Stark Reality Copying a definition from a book, or doing a definition-matching worksheet, does little to engage or prepare students for End of Course Take the Best Definition in student's words
Examples / Non-examples
Illustration
Share & Discuss
Word Wall Leave the Rest Rote memorization
Copying definition word for word
No discussion
No application
No recall Acculturation WINDOW PANE pROCESSING TERM DEFINITION IN STUDENT'S OWN WORDS aCCULTURATION IS WHEN A COUNTRY'S CULTURE CHANGES AS A RESULT OF OUTSIDE INFLUENCES EXAMPLES / NON-EXAMPLES cOCA cOLA CONSUMED AROUND THE WORLD
PREDOMINANCE OF SPOKEN ENGLISH
"WESTERN" CLOTHING
gLOBAL RELIGIONS NON-EXAMPLES: dISTINCT NATIONAL IDENTITIES, DESPITE ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL UNION (EU)
RELIGIOUS BACKLASH AGAINST OUTSIDE / NON-TRADITIONAL INFLUENCES (TALIBAN)
Euro Disney controversy ILLUSTRATION A Shift in Teaching and Learning Teaching Practices to Decrease Teaching Practices to Increase With a partner, sort the cards located in the envelope at your table into the "increase" column or the "Decrease" column most importantly Students need to discuss and explain their processing with their classmates
good illustrations should be celebrated and shared
word wall contests should be held
quality examples should be referred to repeatedly sorting debrief: What patterns emerge from this activity?
How could the "Increase" items impact World Geography instruction?
Other comments / observations? while it's not always
pleasant, we must remember: learning is noisy,
death is quiet. students make meaning
by discussing concepts
with their peers facts topics concepts generalizations our
OBJECTIVES Participants will analyze
common assessment data
with a partner, specifically looking for patterns and trends and assessing students' strengths and weaknesses Discuss and determine the
most effective method for
teaching academic vocabulary
and make a window pane
for "acculturation" With a partner,
discuss and sort characteristics
of effective teaching, emphasizing the importance of student collaboration Distinguish between
facts, topics, concepts,
and generalizations,
and summarize the significance of teaching to concepts & generalizations In order to better understand EOC-style questions,
create an EOC question
with a partner
using a provided visual aide. universal generalization course generalization Topical generalization Historical perspective allows humans
to identify how the world
has changed in the past and how
it might change in the future. Historically, people, places, and environments change over time. As a result of political, ethnic, and/or religious conflict, many European
political borders changed over the course of the 20th century. War World II The Balkan Conflict European union ? are there other
reasons to teach
to concepts and
generalizations? Generalizations are ideal for
triggering student prior knowledge Generalizations are well suited
for content review understanding generalizations requires many of the same
higher order thinking skills
(think bloom's taxonomy)
required for success
on end of course exams i.e. rather than asking students to list causes of the Balkan Conflict, students are asked to explain how the Balkan Conflict is an example of how places change over time TEST TAKING STRATEGIES WITH A DIFFERENT PARTNER,
SUMMARIZE WHAT YOU FEEL
ARE THE GREATEST BENEFITS
OF CONCEPT-BASED INSTRUCTION

QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER:

HOW DOES THIS LOOK IN A CLASSROOM?
WHAT ARE THE POTENTIAL BENEFITS?
WHAT PITFALLS / PROBLEMS DO YOU ANTICIPATE?
WHAT RESOURCES EXIST TO HELP ME? world geography common assessment
follow up November 30, 2010 Evaluate the effectiveness
of this professional development session on the AISD evaluation form. Obviously, reviewing common assessment questions with students is one way to teach test taking strategies. However, like in so many other contexts, students learn best by collaboratively "doing," rather than passively listening. One example of how to effectively engage students in their own test taking preparation is to have them write sample questions:
If they can write a question and explain it to the class, that's higher order thinking related to the content. Based upon what you have learned about Europe, write an EOC question with a partner. Your question should be related
to the visual stimulus provided to you.

Keep in mind that EOC questions often do the following: Require an inference from stimulus - the answer is not in the visual Provide lengthy answer choices Include complex distractors Dual coding: content and skill Mental maps Cluster questions Negative questions Demanding and lengthy
reading passages Application of vocabulary Be prepared to share your question with the group by projecting it with the document camera and by explaining it. Questions? Comments? Concerns?
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