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Foreign Instruments

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by

Judy Pirnia

on 18 April 2017

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Transcript of Foreign Instruments

SCOTLAND
(UNITED KINGDOM)
Bagpipes
Sound credit:
https://www.freesound.org/people/vinjatovix/sounds/178470/
WEST AFRICA
DJEMBE
Sound Credit:
https://www.freesound.org/people/Owl/sounds/187651/
AUSTRAILIA
DIGERIDOO
Image Source:
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Didgeridoo_street_player-2.jpg
CC BY
INDIA
SITAR
Image Credit:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ustaad_Prof._Kirpal_Singh_Jandu_playing_sitar_at_there_MusicInstitution.jpg
CC BY-SA
Image altered to focus on instrument
JAPAN
Sound Source:
https://www.freesound.org/people/zagi2/sounds/331734/
KOTO
Instruments from Abroad
compiled and organized by Judy Pirnia
background image: https://pixabay.com/en/galaxy-world-map-map-of-the-world-2150186/
CC0
The Scottish bagpipe is thought to have developed from a Roman instrument used for outdoor communication, much like a town crier.
There are many myths about historical use and persecution of pipers.
Source: www.bagpipehistory.info
The koto was brought to Japan from China, but developed into a unique instrument over time.
The koto was an exclusive imperial instrument for an extended time.
Source: Wanczura, D. (n.d.) The Japanese koto. retrieved from www.artelino.com
The djembe originated in West Africa and has become widely used in West African countries like Mali, Senegal, and Guinea.
The djembe can produce different sounds by striking it with different parts of the hand or on different parts of the drum head.
Source: http://www.drumafrica.co.uk/
Sound Credit:
https://www.freesound.org/people/Kaiho/sounds/37715/
The sitar is an ancient instrument whose origin has been lost to history.
There are three types of sitar that differ in number of strings. The most common is the kharaj pancham with nine strings total.
Source: Banerjee, I. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.carbonsitars.com/
Sound Source
https://www.freesound.org/people/vinjatovix/sounds/109263/
CC BY
The digeridoo is an instrument of the native, or aboriginal people of Australia.
Today the digeridoo is sometimes played for fun, but traditionally is a ceremonial instrument or used to communicate over long distances.
Source: www.newworldencyclopedia.org
Creative Commons information:
https://creativecommons.org/
Public Domain
Attribution
Attribution,
NonCommercial
Attribution,
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