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Lessons 9-14 A Long Walk to Water

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Nicole Green

on 15 September 2014

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Transcript of Lessons 9-14 A Long Walk to Water

Lessons 9-14
A Long Walk to Water

Lessons 11 & 12
Lessons 9 & 10
Lessons 13 & 14
Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face
Lesson 9
Learning Targets

I can analyze how Linda Sue Park develops and contrasts the points of view of Nya and Salva.
I can effectively engage in discussions with my classmates about our reading.
I can select ideas from my notes to support the analysis of the characters Nya and Salva.
Self-reflection
"I can cite several pieces of text-based evidence to support my analysis of Nya's and Salva's character."

Complete reflection paper
World Cafe Discussion
How do culture, time, and place influence the development of identity?

Get out your Gathering Evidence graphic organizers from Chapters 1-4, your Reader's Notes and your novels.

Get into groups of three.
Group Instructions
You will need a recorder.
Discuss and record responses about the question on your table card prompt.
Work for three minutes.
Switch - recorder stays put.

Recorder from Round 1 summarizes the conversation that happened at the table.
Choose a new Round II recorder.

Continue for three rounds.
Planning for Writing
Pre-writing Ideas graphic organizer
Use group charts to help you!

Examples:
Because Nya's story happens in 2008, she is not fleeing from a war but is able to stay home and help her family find water every day. (time)

Salva is unsure every time he meets new people, because he is a Dinka, and the Dinka are at war with the Nuer and in a Civil War with the government. (culture)
Closure
Collect pre-writing ideas
Revisit learning targets
Homework: Read from your outside reading books.
Lesson 10
Learning Targets

I can make connections from the text "Sudanese Tribes Confront Modern War" to the novel A Long Walk to Water.
I can annotate text to help me track important ideas in Excerpt 1 of "Sudanese Tribes Confront Modern War."
I can use context clues to determine word meanings.
Turn to page 33 and listen to Nya's story.

Why is Nya scared of the Dinka? Why is Salva scared of the Nuer?
"Sudanese Tribes Confront Modern War" - difficult vocabulary
Read Excerpt 1

Work to figure out challenging words in context

Share strategies
Rereading for the Gist
Read and pause after each paragraph to annotate the gist and answer questions on chart

What is Excerpt 1 mostly about? Annotate at top of paper!
Closure
HOMEWORK:
Reread Excerpt 1

Complete Gathering Evidence graphic organizer for Excerpt 1

**** Look at Column 3 - You are to digest the quote and say what is important about it
Bridge to Informational Text
Lesson 11
Learning Targets
I can make connections from the text "Sudanese Tribes Confront Modern War" to the novel A Long Walk to Water.

I can use context clues to determine word meaning.

I can cite several pieces of text-based evidence to support an analysis of excerpts from the article "Sudanese Tribes Confront Modern War."
Sharing Homework
Share responses to quotes

Respond in writing:
"In 1983, when the war 'entered its current phase,' who was fighting whom? What is the quote from the article that gives you this information?
Main idea of first three paragraphs
Copy this summary onto your article:

"The Dinka and Nuer both live in Southern Sudan and have been stealing each other's cattle for a long time. Until 1983, just a few warriors used to die in these raids. In 1983, they were on the same side of the war, and started to have guns."
How does this article help us understand Salva's point of view?
Read aloud Excerpt 2
Focus on vocabulary

Discuss and annotate words you figure out
fault line - division
topple - take down; overturn
coup - military uprising
spiritual pollution - personal unrest
guerrillas - rebel fighters
roughshod - without care, supervision or safety
dysfunction - problems
assault - military
Closure
Revisit learning targets

Add to "Things Close Reader's Do" chart
Use the text to answer questions
Pay attention to vocabulary
Determine vocabulary in context
Homework
Reread Excerpt 2 and annotate the text for gist
Lesson 12
Learning Targets
I can make connections from the text "Sudanese Tribes Confront Modern War" to the novel A Long Walk to Water.

I can use context clues to determine word meanings.

I can cite several pieces of text-based evidence to support an analysis of excerpts from the article "Sudanese Tribes Confront Modern War."
Go over homework
* Share text annotations

Gist statements:
The larger Sudanese war was also continuing.
In 1991, the rebel army started fighting among themselves, with the Dinka tribe fighting against the Nuer tribe.
The fighting between the tribes was much more violent than ever before because the two tribes were now using military guns against each other.
Go over questions E and F

Summary of Excerpt 2
"In 1991 the rebel army split, and the Dinka and Nuer started killing each other with guns. They didn't believe that killing each other with guns as a part of a government war was as bad as killing each other with spears like they did before."
Copy onto your article:
Reading for Gist- Excerpt 2
Reread Excerpt 2

Complete Gathering Evidence graphic organizer for Excerpt 2

Respond in writing:
"In 1991, when the war 'entered a new phase' and the Dinka and Nuer started fighting each other, what was different in how they fought? What is the quote from the article that gives you this information?

Collect responses
Salva's point of view in Chapters 1-5 takes place before this period of time.

How does this article help us to understand Salva's point of view?
The tension between the DInka and Nuer is growing during Salva's journey, and this tension will result in fighting between the Dinka and Nuer by 1991.
Closure
Revisit learning targets
Selecting Evidence graphic organizer tomorrow!

Homework: Read from outside reading books.
Lesson 13
Learning Targets
I can select evidence from the article "Sudanese Tribes Confront Modern War" to support analysis of the perspectives of the Nuer and Dinka tribes of Southern Sudan.

I can annotate text to help me track important ideas.

I can use context clues to determine word meanings.
Lesson 14
Learning Targets
I can cite several pieces of text-based evidence to support an analysis of the article "Loss of Culturally Vital Cattle Leaves Dinka Tribe Adrift in Refugee camps."
I can select evidence from the article "Loss of Culturally Vital Cattle Leaves Dinka Tribe Adrift in Refugee Camps" to support analysis of the perspectives of the Dinka tribe of Southern Sudan.
Selecting Evidence graphic organizer
Complete the steps listed on the second half of the page.

**** Choose the best evidence that you want to write about

Hand it in!
"Loss of Culturally Vital Cattle Leaves Dinka Tribe Adrift in Refugee Camps"
Reread p. 2 of A Long Walk to Water

Why do you think there is so much talk about cattle in this novel? How is that important in terms of us understanding Salva's experience?
Loss of Culturally Vital Cattle Leaves Dinka Tribe Adrift in Refugee Camps
By Stephen Buckley
Washington Post Foreign Service
Sunday, August 24, 1997; Page A01

The dancing begins at 7:25 a.m. as the thump of a drum splits the cool morning air in the Mangalatore camp for the displaced. A bull's horn wails. A swell of song fills the air. Young men run and leap, legs splayed, Jordanesque, heads rising above the hopping, singing, chanting, ululating crowd.

Hundreds of Dinka tribesmen and women have gathered at the Duk-Fuel family compound for a traditional dowry celebration. But the occasion is marred by what is missing: There will be no cattle given to the Duk-Fuel family today, historically the central transaction at this ritual.

The Duk-Fuels must settle instead for cautious promises. The family whose boy wants to marry a Duk-Fuel girl vows to give plenty of cattle when the four-decade-old war in this, Africa's largest country, someday ends. "We will honor our agreement," the boy's uncle says.

For all its joy, the dowry ritual reminds these Dinka families that the war has robbed them of a symbol central to their identity and culture — cattle.

Mabil Duk-Fuel sits in the family compound next to his niece Nyandier Duk-Fuel, 17. Joining them are Mabil's brother Mayar and another niece, Agot. Both girls will marry soon, although the next day's dowry ceremony is primarily for Nyandier.

The men say the absence of cattle has transformed the dowry process. Negotiations used to be held in which the boy's family agreed to give cows, sometimes as many as 100, to the Dinka girl's relatives; several families would make such overtures toward a single girl, in a process akin to competitive bidding.
Nowadays the negotiations are still held, but they are about handshakes and pledges. There is no livestock available to change hands.

Holding the ceremony without cattle, Mabil says, reminds Dinkas that they have no property. "You cannot regain your land," he says through an interpreter. "That is the great loss. . .‚. We hope our leaders are working hard to get us back our land."

Before the war caused institutions to collapse in southern Sudan, the Dinka were not only farmers and cowherds, but also high court judges and civil administrators and doctors. They were the south's richest and proudest tribe.

The cow has always been the focus of their culture. Cattle stood at the heart of virtually every important tradition and ceremony in Dinka life. Myths rose up around the animal. The Dinka wrote songs about it. They created dances to honor it.

Dinka see the animal as the highest form of wealth. Today some Dinka retain their cattle, but many have lost their herds, which were killed in fighting or abandoned during the rush to camps for the displaced.

© Copyright 1997 The Washington Post Company


Important Words
ululating - howling

compound - housing for many people; a group of shelters or houses

dowry - (property or money) brought by a bride to her husband's family when they marry

primarily - mainly
Read Aloud and Annotate for Gist
Annotate one paragraph at a time and share annotations and gist
What words in paragraph 1 signaled to you that it was mostly about a celebration?
Paragraph 2: How do you know what the dowry is supposed to be?

Summarize - What is the main idea?
dancing, song, chanting, ululating
Copy this summary: "The Dinka use cattle as dowry to celebrate weddings, but since the Dinka have no land and have no cattle because of the war, they can only make promises to give cattle in the future."
Closure
Things Close Readers Do

Exit Ticket

Homework:
With the article "Loss of Culturally Vital Cattle Leaves Dinka Tribe Adrift in Refugee camps," reread Excerpt 1.

Then do a first read of Excerpt 2. Try to figure out any of the words in bold.
Distribute End of Unit Assessment: Gathering Evidence and Selecting Evidence graphic organizer
Now that we've read some articles about the Dinka and Nuer tribes in Southern Sudan, what is one image that stays in your mind about how time, culture, or place has affected the people of Sudan?

What is another image that stays in your mind?

If you could ask a member of the Dinka or Nuer tribe one question about his or her life, what would you ask? Why?
Full transcript