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Comic Art

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by

Charlotte Mann

on 24 March 2014

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Transcript of Comic Art

IS ROY LICHTENSTEIN OR THE COMIC ARTIST THE REAL ARTIST? WHY?
To create Drowning Girl, Roy Lichtenstein appropriated imagery from this Tony Abruzzo panel from “Run For Love” in Secret Hearts, no. 83 (November 1962).
1962 issue of DC Comics' All-American Men of War
CAREERS
http://mcad.edu/considering-mcad/career-paths
http://www.ep.tc/mlk/index.html
BRIEF HISTORY OF COMICS
Victorian Age:
1646- 1896 Includes Benjamin Franklin's illustrations. These comics typically don't have speech or thought bubbles and are not sequential story telling.

Platinum Age:
1897-1938 With the introduction of "The Yellow Kid" The modern comic book developed. Speech bubbles and sequential story telling became common place.

Golden Age:
1938-1949 With the debut of Action comics #1 and Superman, superheros created a dramatic surge in comic popularity

Atom Age:
1949-1956 A dark time for comics, during tough social and economic times, comics reflected by being violent, graphic and extremely dark. Out of this time produced the Comics Code Authority, a form of self censorship and policing.

Silver Age:
1956-1970 The reintroduction of superheros. Superheros were modernized and most of the characters we know today became popular, iconic characters were reinvented, introduced with sidekicks and also underground comics gained momentum.

Bronze Age:
1970-1984 Comic book stores first started opening and promoting the comic industry through the idea of collector's and conventions.

Copper Age:
1984-1992 Independent comic printing was on the rise, thus some quality of comics were very low. Companies rose and fell quickly, but DC and Marvel upped their quality of storytelling and continued to reinvent their characters and history.

Modern Age:
1992- Present DC comics made a bold move and killed off Superman. This caused a hype and peak in sales, however consumers faded. Japanese comic books hit the states and also brought in a surprising amount of female fans. There are currently many controversies of this age surrounding copyright issues. Recently the movie and tv industry has been making many adaptations of comics and also having comics created based off of series, movies, games, etc.


1956
Roy Lichtenstein 1923-1997
ARTOON/IMADEFACE APP
20pts
1. Download and open either app. Borrow an iPad instead if you like.
2, Create a self-portrait comic. Use a mirror or from memory to create a comic self-portrait. you can scroll through right and left different options of facial features and scroll up and down for colors.
Make sure to change the background too!
3. When finished, hit share button all the way on bottom right and email your portrait with your name to Ms. Mann at charlotte.mann@isd624.org

Also in this email, provide your own critique/review of the app. Provide at least 3 criticisms or things you noticed.
Sequential Comic 100pts
Sequential Art
is a term used for art that tells a story or narrative through a sequence or series of images, so a form of art rather than a style. Graphic novels, comics, and cartoons are all sequential art.
1.
Brainstorm
the story you want to tell. Is your comic serious? Is it about something funny that happend to you?
2.
Envision
what you want your characters to look like, they don't have to be human.
3.
Sketch
out your thumbnails and characters.
4. On minimum one sheet of bristol board, plan out and
render
/draw your comic.
5.
REVISE!
Make sure there are no spelling errors and that your comic is sequential and makes sense.
6.
Ink
your comic and erase your pencil lines.
7. Optional is to
color
your comic, or scan in your comic and color with Photoshop.
We will have a comic reading/critique for the last day of the unit.
GRADING RUBRICS
Artoon:
Completed
and emailed 5pts
Likeness
, resembles student 5pts
Written reflection
about app in email 5pts
Being
respectful
and positive in class 5pts
Sequential Comic:
Completed
, inked and cleanly erased 20pts
Creative
use of story/sequential 30pts
Work ethic
, being on task during work time 20pts
Technique
, straight lines, interesting panel use, no spelling errors. 20pts
Respectful
and positive attitude towards self and others 10pts

Appropriation: Appropriation is the practice of creating new work by taking a preexisting image from another source—art history books, advertisements, the media—and transforming or combining it with new ones.
Lichtenstein was one of the first American Pop artists, his inspiration often came from the culture and little of the artist's individual feelings. Which was a change from the previous abstract expressionist movement. Lichtenstein was often accused of copying from comics, but his production methods emphasized mechanical reproduction. On large canvases he used stencils to paint Ben-Day dots, and made alterations to parody and emphasize his paintings. He often made work to challenge previous art ideas and notions and worked to bring a serious context to pop art.
http://www.npr.org/2012/10/15/162807890/one-dot-at-a-time-lichtenstein-made-art-pop

http://www.theartstory.org/artist-lichtenstein-roy.htm

http://www.daveybeauchamp.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/Ages-of-Comics-Davey-Beauchamp.pdf

RESOURCES
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