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EDKP 442 - Physical Literacy

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Ossie Long

on 2 October 2012

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Transcript of EDKP 442 - Physical Literacy

P H Y S I C A L The Concept of WHAT IS PHYISCAL LITERACY? Wall, J. & Murray, N. (1994). Children and movement: Physical education in the elementary school. Dubuque, Iowa: Wm C Brown Co. Publishers. “To be physically literate, one should be creative, imaginative, and clear in expressive movement, competent and efficient in utilitarian movement and inventive, versatile, and skillful in objective movement” George Morrison (1969) Canadian Sport Centres: Canadian Sport for Life (2012). Developing Physical Literacy. Retrieved from: http://canadiansportforlife.ca/sites/default/files/resources/Developing%20Physical%20Literacy.pdf Defines physical literacy as:

The development of fundamental movement skills and fundamental sport skills that permit a child to move confidently and with control, in a wide range of physical activity, rhythmic and sport situations

Being physically literate includes reacting appropriately to events and reading what is going on around them in an activity based setting Canadian Sport for Life Physical and Health Education Canada. 2011. Physical Literacy. Retrieved from
http://www.phecanada.ca/programs/physical-literacy/what-physical-literacy Those who are physically literate:

Move with competence and confidence

Regularly develop the motivation and ability to apply, communicate, understand, and analyze the different forms of movement

Can also demonstrate a variety of movements confidentially, creatively, competently and strategically (across a wide range of health-related physical activities)

With this variety of skills, individuals can make healthy and active choices (which are beneficial to and respectful of their whole self, others, and their environment). PHE Canada Supporters of Physical Literacy Whitehead, M. (2007). Physical literacy and its importance to every individual. Presentation at the National Disability Association Ireland, Dublin, Ireland. Retrieved from: http://www.physical-literacy.org.uk/dublin2007.php Margaret Whitehead (2007)
Characteristics of Physical Literacy Whitehead, M. (2007). Physical literacy and its importance to every individual. Presentation at the National Disability Association Ireland, Dublin, Ireland. Retrieved from: http://www.physical-literacy.org.uk/dublin2007.php “The motivation, confidence, physical competence, understanding and knowledge to maintain physical activity at an individually appropriate level, throughout life” Margaret Whitehead (2007) Whitehead, M. (2001). The concept of physical literacy. European Journal of Physical Education, 6, 127-138. “The physically literate individual, on perceiving the environment, through a range of senses, appreciates, via experience; the relevant components of the display e.g. shape size, weight, surface, speed, and movement of others. These attributes of the environment are immediately understood as meaningful, in that they resonate with embodied capacities, and the individual will know at once how to move, to relate effectively with the combined aspects of the environment in question. This knowledge of how to relate is the result of previous experience” Margaret Whitehead (2001) Whitehead, M. (2001). The concept of physical literacy. European Journal of Physical Education, 6, 127-138. Made her first attempt to discuss the topic, arguing that:

Physical literacy is essential to a complete experience of human life. Margaret Whitehead (1993) Mandigo, J., Francis, N., & Lodewyk, K. (2007). Physical Literacy Concept Paper. Canadian Sport for Life. Retrieved from: http://canadiansportforlife.ca/sites/default/files/resources/Physical%20Literacy%20Concept%20Paper.pdf Knowledge and Understanding
Thinking
Communication
Application Mandigo, Francis, & Lodewyk (2007) Browne, R., & Neal, A. (1991). The many tongues of literacy. Journal of Popular Culture, 25(1), 157-186. “Having the ability to understand and use the standard form of communication in a particular context and for a particular purpose” Browne & Neal (1991) An Interesting Response... Hi Dr. Morrison! Cultural awareness brought on a sense of immediate synchronicity not previously learned. Findings from on the Stage: Data was collected and explored through videotapes, observations, interviews, and reflections.

Hermeneutical approach to deciphering the message. Data Collection: Whitehead describes the concept of physical literacy, as a method of educating in a holistic manner geared toward involving both the body and mind in all aspects of learning. Definition of physical/movement literacy
applied in this study: -May help educators gain a baseline understanding of how cultural norms influence ability and understanding.

-How movement/physical literacy can be applied to other subject matter. Strengths: -Could a scientific approach be applied?

-Manipulating environments and/or equipment.

-Multicultural countries!

-Levels of industrialization.

-Observation bias? (examples of field notes!!!) Weaknesses: Understanding of unwritten rules, based on gender specific games and ability.

Kentel and Dobson describes this way of understanding as a way of knowing that engages the whole person. Findings from in the Courtyard: Fabrication of own equipment along with surrounding environment greatly improved the understanding of force production, motion, velocity, mass, acceleration;

Demonstration of a mind-body connection. Findings from on the Field: Children were observed in the field during:

- Unstructured play time (afterschool),

- In the courtyard (recess),

- On the stage, and

- At the desk. Areas Observed: - Qualitative.

- The aim of this design was to explain:

- Why children moved as they did?

- How their movement differed with respect to children in industrialized countries?

- In what way was their movements different? Research Design: Kenyan children from public and private schools.

Participants were chosen as culture in the form of dance and tradition were important toward movement development. Participants: To promote and describe the mind-body connection through movement understanding. (physical/movement literacy) Purpose: Jeanne Kentel
&
Teresa Dobson Beyond the Myopic Vision of Education:
Revisiting Movement Literacy. RESEARCH Let's Watch! Findings from at the Desk: Children were animated. Connecting Physical Literacy and Physical Education By: PHE Canada Physical Literacy and General Education Physical Literacy and Physcial Education PHE Canada (2012, September 4). Connecting Physical Literacy and Physical Education [Video file]. Retrieved from youtube.com/phecanada If a student shows an increase in self-confidence and self-esteem in physical activity settings there is a strong likelihood that they will increase their participation in physical activities. And what
does this mean? Development of:

- Self-realization

- Self-confidence

- Positive self-esteem Why?

PHE Canada (2012, September 4). Connecting Physical Literacy and Physical Education [Video file]. Retrieved from (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GU7LVXkvxAM&) Physical Literacy &
Long Term Athlete Development Who is pushing for
Physical Literacy? Whitehead, M. (2001). The concept of physical literacy. European Journal of Physical Education, 6, 127-138. “Physical Literacy plays a very significant part in the development
of self-realisation, self-confidence and positive self-esteem.”

-Margaret Whitehead Implications of Physical Literacy on Teaching Weaknesses Strengths - Yes!

- The push for Physical Literacy shows an increased understanding about various mechanical and physical properties and how this understanding may strengthen students understanding of other cross curricular subject matter.

- Information becomes more salient. Does Physical Literacy show progress in thoughts surrounding PHE? - Perhaps it is about adopting a new way of thinking about Physical Education.

- A way that is easy to buy into from all levels of the partnerships surrounding education

- This way we, as teachers, can ensure that Physical Education remains a valued part of the curriculum at the school and community level. So then why the push for Physical Literacy? - Lack of research on the topic.

- Lack of measurability.

- How does a teacher measure if a student is becoming more physically literate? Major Issues - No!

- We believe that quality Physical Education programs deliver the same outcomes as this relatively new term of ‘Physical Literacy’

- People fail to recognize this important achievement? Is Physical Literacy really something new? - Well presented.
- Persuasively informative.
- Concise.
- Seems to be credible. - Unsupported claims
- Where are the research findings?
- Measurable?
- Who are these people?
Whitehead, M. (2001). The concept of physical literacy. European Journal of Physical Education, 6, 127-138. THANK YOU!
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