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Storytelling: Teaching and Learning

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Maggie Bunce

on 31 October 2013

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Transcript of Storytelling: Teaching and Learning

Storytelling: Teaching & Learning
Angel, Amanda, Robin, Olimpia and Maggie
Introducing Jo-Ann Archibald PhD.
Presentation Overview
1. Introducing Jo-Ann Archibald
2. The Speaker and the Listener
3. Story Meanings
4. Misrepresentation of Story in Western culture
5. Oral Traditions and Written Word
6. Valuing Storytelling
7. Lesson Plan Critique
8. Talking Circle
The Speaker and The Listener

- Member of the Sto:lo Nation, grew up on the Soowhalie Reserve near Cultus Lake
- elementary school teacher in Chilliwack
- professor at UBC in Vancouver
- director of Native Indian Teacher Education Program
- director of First Nations House of Learning
-Associate Dean for Indigenous Education in the Faculty
of Education
- much of her academic work focuses on Indigenous storywork and bringing Indigenous ways of knowing into academia

“Stories have the power to make our hearts, minds, bodies, and spirits work together.” (p. 12)
- Listen with the heart & "let[ting] our emotions surface"
- The listener has an active role
- Connection to the speaker
- Speaker and listener harmony
Lesson Plan Critique
Rationale: The story "The Rough-Face Girl" was selected because of its cross-curricular applications regarding Canadian First Nations culture and oral traditons. The story also illustrates to students that emotions are universal and are not determined by culture as demonstrated in the similarities between the Euro-Western Cinderella and this story.
What are the issues that could arise within this objective?

References
Valuing the Art of Storytelling
teaches awareness of how retelling stories can change them
part of culture- passes down beliefs and values
reveal beliefs in creative and interpretive way
enhances understanding through gestures, tone, rhythm
speaker’s personality alters certain aspects of the story

“Words are not objects to be wasted. They represent the accumulated knowledge, cultural values, the vision of an entire people of peoples.” (p. 26)
“Indian elders often remind young people to live the myths by saying, ‘These stories, this language, these ways, and this land are the only valuables we can give you- but life is in them for those who know how to ask and how to learn.” (p. 17)
Story Meanings
Stories can be heard repeatedly so they become embedded in memory.
The meaning of stories, like teaching, is a reciprocal process between the teacher and the student.
It's a spiral that adds a little with new meaning in each turn of the spiral.
Jo-Ann
The Coyote - connections to personal experiences.
Conclusions: Oral Traditions and Written Word
Oral Tradition and Written Word
"Oral tradition still lives, and the written tradition is growing within it, not exempt from it. The one will never replace the other." (p. 14)
Written stories do not challenge the listener to remember
Western literacy violates the stories integrity and is another act of colonization
Causes the storytellers tone, gestures, and personalities to be lost
The learner/listener greatly impacts what and how stories are told
Written discourse is sometimes a way of having Aboriginal voices heard
A way of ensuring stories will be passed down
Translation of Stories
Translation of stories to English can also pose challenges
The framework of English is very different than many Aboriginal languages and dilects
Important for the reader to know the "core" of the story
Intrductory ethographic information can provide contextual information
May still not be enough
Cultural intiation may be necessary
Conclusion: Oral Tradition and Written Word
Whenever possible, invite Elders and/or storytellers into the classroom
When this is not possible, ensure authenticity by considering the following:
Find written work that stays true to the culture and context of the story
Ensure the text is not explicity
Elders/storytellers have been allowed to write about what they feel is relevant
Misrepresentation of Stories in Western Culture
"The insistence on reading Native literature by way of Western literary theory clearly violates its integrity and performs a new act of colonization and conquest." (p. 17)
Stories vs. Storytelling- What are Western ideas of story?
Little Wagon and his grandson
Values in "White Schooling"
good vs. evil instead of balance and harmony
fiction vs. non-fiction
moral lessons
Little Red Riding Hood
The Ugly Duckling
Cinderella
“Stories have the power to make our hearts, minds, bodies, and spirits work together.” (p. 12)

“Indian elders often remind young people to live the myths by saying, ‘These stories, this language, these ways, and this land are the only valuables we can give you- but life is in them for those who know how to ask and how to learn.” (p. 17)

"The insistence on reading Native literature by way of Western literary theory clearly violates its integrity and performs a new act of colonization and conquest." (p. 17)

"Oral tradition still lives, and the written tradition is growing within it, not exempt from it. The one will never replace the other." (p. 14)

“Words are not objects to be wasted. They represent the accumulated knowledge, cultural values, the vision of an entire people of peoples.” (p. 26)
Archibald, J. (2008). The journey begins. In Indigenous storywork: Educating the heart, mind, body, and spirit. Vancouver, BC: UBC Press. (p. 1- 34)

Paul, C. (n.d.) (Aboriginal Education Logo). Retrieved from http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/abed/logo_description.htm

Stong Nations Web Site (n.d.). Retrieved on October 30, 2013, from
http://www.strongnations.com/
Full transcript