Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

The Progressive Era: Part 1

No description
by

Frank McKee

on 31 March 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of The Progressive Era: Part 1

Urbanization
By 1920 more than
one-half
of the population lived in urban setting

the shift changed Americans' culture and the quality of their lives

As
Jefferson
feared, urbanization brought with it
increased crime
,
political corruption
and a
clash of classes

Photojournalists like
Jacob Riis
exposed the nation to the overcrowded and squalid conditions of life in urban tenements
Industrialization
Immigrants:
mines, steel mills, factories & slaughterhouses
60% of workers in Swift & Armour meatpacking plants
16,000 of 23,000 workers in Homestead steel in Pa.
Frederick Taylor
Scientific Management
"All possible brainwork should be removed from the shop . . . not only what is to be done but how it is to be done & the exact time allowed for doing it."
Social Diversity in the Progressve Era
Traditional & Progressive
Educations
Traditional: teach elements of knowledge through an academic curriculem
Immigration
Historical Immigration: (1866-1870)
98%
of immigrants from
northern & western Europe
--England, Scotland, Wales, Ireland, Scandanavia, & Germany

New Immigration: (1906-1910)
4.5 million
, almost
80%
of whom were from
southern and eastern Europe
--Itgaly, Greece, Russia, Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, & Lithuania
The Urbanization of America
1870
Urban Population = 26%
1880
Urban Population = 28%
1890
Urban Population = 35%
1900
Urban Population = 40%
1910
Urban Population = 46%
1920
Urban Population = 51%
Progressive: knowledge + physical, mental, and social training requiring an "
enriched
" curriculum that includes, in addition to academics, community activities, recreation, shop work and household arts.
Content
Methods
Shifts focus from
discipline
to modern
psychology
,
ethics& social philosophy
Restricting Immigration
1882: Chinese Exclusion Act: based on racist belief of Chinese inferiority.
"The Chinese are inferior to any race God ever made . . . [they] have no souls to save, & if they have, they are not worth saving."
Emma Lazarus
"The New Collosus" (1886)

"Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to be free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore,
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me;
I lift my lamp beside the golden door
Certain racial groups were more evolved than others.
Would America restrict immigration to those "British, German, & Scandinavian stock, historically free, energetic, progressive?"
"Or by Slav, Latin, & Asiatic races, historically downtrodden, atavistic, and stagnant"?"
Madison Grant (1916)
"The Passing of the Great Race"
"The new immigration . . . contained a large number of the weak, the broken, and the mentally crippled of all races drawn from the lowest stratum of the Mediterranean basin & the Balkans, together with the hoardes of the wretched, submerged populations of the Polish ghettos."
Restricting Immigration
1921: Immigration restrictions based on nationality.

1924 & 1929: Stronger national quotas; as much as 99% below earlier peak years
1870

1920
50% Agrarian
25% Agrarian
Industry creates business: trade, finance, & real estate jobs increased X 6
Age of Industry
succeeds
Age of Agriculture
Mass-production & Technology
From 1870 to 1920 major new inventions appeared in the U.S. about every 15 months on average
Typewriters
Telephones
Phonographs
Light bulbs
Aluminum
Vulcanized rubber
Wireless radio
Electric washing machines
Airplanes
Women's Work?
1900
1920
Domestics = 39%

Manufacturing = 25%

Agriculture = 18%

Professionals = 8%
Office Work = 25.6%

Manufacturing = 23.8%

Domestic = 18.2%

Agriculture = 12.8%
American Workers & Industry
"[The machinist] has got no chance whatever to learn anything else because he is kept constantly at that particular thing and his intellect is narrowed by it. In fact he becomes almost a part of the machinery."

(John Morrison: Congressional testimony)
Immigrant populations in 5 major cities
Chicago
New York
MIlwaukee
San Francisco
Atlanta
Total Populations

Foreign Born White

Native White
Foreign Parents
Native White
Mixed Parents
Black

Asian

At least 1 foreign born parent (1910)
2,185,000 4,767,000 374,000 417.000 155,000
781,000 1,928,000 111,000 131,000 4,000
705,000 1,445,000 375,000 107,000 4,000
208,000 375,000 47,000 46,000 3,000
44,000 92,000 1,000 2,000 100
2,000 6,000 100 15,000 100
78% 79% 78% 68% 7%
Major Immigrant Groups
Percentage of total foreign born population in 1920 in parenthesis
Chicago
New York
Milwaukee
San Francisco
Atlanta
Poland (17)

Germany (14)

Russia (13)

Italy (07)

Sweden (07)

Ireland (07)

Chech (07)
Russia (25)

Italy (20)

Ireland (10)

Germany (10)

Austria (06)

England (04)

Hungary (03)
Germany (36)

Poland (21)

Russia (06)

Austria (05)

Hungary (05)
Italy (17)

Germany (14)

Ireland (13)

England (07)

France (06)

Canada (05)

Sweden (04)
None
Progressives & The Gilded Age
Theodore Roosevelt
Progressive Party
American Trusts
"Square Deal"
Full transcript