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The Three Little Pigs And The big Bad Wolf

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by

Jack Wisniewski

on 3 March 2014

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Transcript of The Three Little Pigs And The big Bad Wolf

Old sow (Mother pig), Man with a bundle of straw, man with a bundle of furze, man with a load of bricks.
Setting
Background Information
The Theme
Minor Characters
James Orchard Halliwell-Phillipps
Plot
James Orchard Halliwell-Phillipps wrote the first version of, "The Three Little Pigs And The Big Bad Wolf". Printed versions of the classic story date back to the 1840s, however the story was thought to be much older. Joseph Jacobs, first published in 1890 and crediting Halliwell as his source.
The climax

The climax is when he confronts the third pig at his home, "So the man gave him the bricks, and he built his house with them. So the wolf came, as he did to the other little pigs, and said:
‘Little pig, little pig, let me come in.’" (Halliwell-Phillipps 2).

The falling action

It was the relief of the wolf not being able to blow up the third pig's house, "Well, he huffed, and he puffed, and he huffed and he puffed, and he puffed and huffed; but he could not get the house down." (Halliwell-Phillipps 2)

Resolution
The big bad wolf got what he deserved and got eaten by the third pig, "so the little pig put on the cover again in an instant, boiled him up, and ate him for supper." (Halliwell-Phillipps 5)

Written by: James Orchard Halliwell-Phillipps
By: Jack, Jake and Mukenge
Characters and Conflict
Literary Devices
Point of View
Conflict:
The conflict is Animals vs Animal, "Then the wolf was very angry indeed, and declared he would eat up the little pig, and that he would get down the chimney after him." (Halliwell-Phillipps 5)
Protagonist(s):
The protagonists in this case are The three little pigs, "There was an old sow with three little pigs, and as she had not enough to keep them, she sent them out to seek their fortune." (Halliwell Phillipps 1).
Antagonist:
The antagonist is The Big Bad Wolf, "So he huffed, and he puffed, and he blew his house in, and ate up the little pig." (Halliwell-Phillipps 1).

The Three Little Pigs And The Big Bad Wolf
The theme of the story is that hardwork and patience pays off in the end. The third pig showed rasilliance and that when you don't cut corners it pays off, "Well, he huffed, and he puffed, and he huffed and he puffed, and he puffed and huffed; but he could not get the house down." (Halliwell-Phillipps 2)
Introduction
In the introduction was when the pigs left their home to start a new life, "There was an old sow with three little pigs, and as she had not enough to keep them, she sent them out to seek their fortune." (Halliwell-Phillipps 1).

The rising action
It was when the wolf confronted the first two pigs and ate them up, "So he huffed, and he puffed, and he puffed, and he huffed, and at last he blew the house down, and he ate up the little pig." (Halliwell-Phillipps 2).
The story takes place in a small village in the country, where the pigs live.
The point of view of the story, "The Three Little Pigs And The Big Bad Wolf” is written in 3rd person. It shows it throughout the text, “'where’ says the pig."(Halliwell-Phillipps 1).
Dialogue: There is a lot of dialogue in this story, “'Then I’ll huff, and I’ll puff, and I’ll blow your house in.’” (Halliwell-Phillipps 3).

Nemesis: The nemesis in this story would be the big bad wolf. In the story the wolf was trying to eat the pigs, "So he huffed, and he puffed, and he puffed, and he huffed, and at last he blew the house down, and he ate up the little pig." (Halliwell-Phillipps 2)
Full transcript