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TLSC French Revolution AOS2

Learning Intentions and Success Criteria
by

Bryce Denny

on 25 October 2012

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Transcript of TLSC French Revolution AOS2

French Revolution
AOS2 - Explain what the DORMAC was

- Identify which groups in French society benefited from the DORMAC

- Identify the inefficiencies in the Old Regime the DORMAC sought to reform

- Explain the benefits it sought to bring to the people

- Identify which groups were ignored by the new legislation

- Explain the role of the Monarchy after August 4 1789 LEARNING INTENTION: Understand the ideas and significance of the Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen (27 August 1789) - Outline why the women marched of Versailles

- Understand what occurred during the women’s march on Versailles

- Explain the role played by Lafayette and the National Guard in this event

- Describe the impact the Women’s march to Versailles had on the royal family and the National Assembly LEARNING INTENTION: Understand the causes, characteristics and consequences of the Women’s March of Versailles (5 October 1789) - Understand why and how the National Assembly decentralized political power in France

- Describe what ‘active’ and ‘passive’ citizens were and why this concept was controversial

- Make reference to the reforms to the legal and judicial system

- Make reference to the reforms to the taxation system

- Make reference to the reforms to the economic system

- Analyse the extent to which these reforms benefited the broader French population LEARNING INTENTION: Explain the National Assembly’s reforms to the economy, taxation and the judicial system - Provide a description of the characteristics of people who participated in revolutionary behaviour

- Describe why political clubs formed

- Identify when the Cordeliers and the Jacobins formed, and understand how they sought to represent the revolutionary crowd

- Identify prominent figures in the Cordeliers and Jacobin clubs LEARNING INTENTION : Understand who made up revolutionary 'crowd' and outline why political clubs were formed - Explain what ‘The Civil Constitution of the Clergy’ was and what it intended to do

- Desscribe what the Clerical Oath was

- Explain why reforms made to the church were unpopular for some

- Explain what is meant by term ‘refractory priests’

- Outline how the National Assembly unintentionally created a group of counter-revolutionaries LEARNING INTENTION: Understand why the reforms to the Church were significant - Identify the new position of the King

- Understand the significance of the King’s suspensive veto

- Understand why the active/passive citizen divide was controversial LEARNING INTENTION: Understand the ideas and significance of the Constitution of 1791 LEARNING INTENTION: Explain the causes, characteristics and consequences of the King’s Flight to Varennes (20 – 21 June 1791) - Explain why the royal family fled to Varennes

-Describe what happened when the royal family fled to Varennes

- Explain what happened to the royal family as a result of the King’s flight to Varennes - Explain the reactions to the King’s flight to Varennes

- Describe the political divisions that occurred as a result of the King’s Flight to Varennes

- Explain the new revolution that had begun in 1791

- Explain what happened at the Champ de Mars on July 17 1791

- Explain the significance of the Champs de Mars massacre LEARNING INTENTION: Understand the causes, characteristics and consequences of the Champ de Mars Massacre (17 July 1791) LEARNING INTENTION: Identify the characteristics of the Legislative Assembly (1 October 1791) - Understand the key points of the 1791 Constitution (done this already!)

- Identify the three dominant groups in the Legislative Assembly

- Explain the challenges faced by the Legislative Assembly

- Identify why the Jacobins gained support during this time - Explain how major European powers viewed the Revolution

- Explain why the Legislative Assembly choose to go to war

- Explain why France were initially unsuccessful

- Describe how failure at war radicalized the Revolution

- Explain how the Legislative Assembly reacted to radical Parisian crowd LEARNING INTENTION: Explain why France went to war (20 April 1792)and how this radicalized the Revolution - Describe why the Insurrectionary Commune stormed the Tuileries

- Explain why the Insurrectionary Commune were successful in storming the Tuilieries

- Explain why the National Convention came to govern France

- Explain the consequences for Louis XVI LEARNING INTENTION: Understand why the Invasion of the Tuileries (10 August 1792) occurred and why this was so significant - Understand the role of war and the press in influencing the September Massacres

- Identify who was massacred and under whose authority

- Explain why the September Massacres occurred

- Explain how France managed to repel the Austrians and Prussians LEARNING INTENTION: Explain the causes and characteristics of the September Massacres (2 - 6 September 1792) - Explain why the National Convention came into existence

- List the three dominant groups in the National Convention

- Explain the differences in policy between the Girondins and La Montagne

- Explain the role of La Marais LEARNING INTENTION: Understand the composition of the National Convention (21 September 1792) and the challenges the National Assembly faced - Describe why Louis XVI was trialed for treason

- Outline the different perspectives held by members of the National Convention toward the execution of Louis XVI

- Describe how the execution of Louis XVI caused further divisions in the National Convention

- Understand the consequences of Louis XVI’s execution in regard to other European countries LEARNING INTENTION: Explain the trial and execution of the Louis XVI (21 January 1793) - Outline the characteristics of the Jacobin constitution of 1793

- Explain why and how the Jacobins changed the calendar and metric system

- Understand Robespierre’s notion of terror and virtue, and explain how these two seemingly contradictory ideas relied on one-another LEARNING INTENTION: Explain the ways in which the Jacobins sought to create a new society - Explain the challenges brought about by international war

- Explain the challenges brought about by civil war

- Understand the economic and financial challenges faced

- Explain the political challenges brought about the by federalist revolt

- Explain the psychological challenges experienced La Montagne LEARNING INTENTION: Identify the challenges faced by the National Convention between 1792 and 1794, and explain their responses - Understand the role of the Committee for Public Safety

- Define the term ‘terror’ in your own words

- Identify when the terror occurred

- Explain how terror was used as a response to the federalist revolt and civil war

- Explain how terror was used as a response to economic and financial challenges

- Explain how terror was used as a response to the financial challenges of the National Convention LEARNING INTENTION: Understand what is meant by the term ‘the terror’ and explain why it occurred LEARNING INTENTION: Explain how the terror had the ‘seeds of its own destruction' - Explain the ‘Law of Frimaire’

- Describe why the Hébertists were killed

- Explain the reasons why Danton and Desmoulins was guillotined

- Explain the significance of the Cult of the Supreme Being

- Describe the 'Law of 22 Priarial' and explain why it was Robespierre’s great mistake - Explain why the need for the terror had diminished

- Outline the reasons why Robespierre had gradually come to be seen as a dictator by many

- Explain why the National Convention had Robespierre arrested

- Outline the events on 27 and 28 July 1794 LEARNING INTENTION: Explain the causes and characteristics of the execution of Robespierre (28 July 1794) - Explain how the Sans Cullote were suppressed

- Describe how ‘right wing’ forces were suppressed

- Outline how the terror was removed

-Identify characteristics of the Year III (1795) Constitution LEARNING INTENTION: Describe the ‘Thermidorian Reaction’ and the events that lead to the return of the Girondins LEARNING INTENTION: Understand the significant role played by Danton in the French Revolution - Outline Danton's role in the Paris and Insurrectionary Communes

- Outline Danton's role in the National Convention, Committee of Public Safety and the terror

- Explain why Danton and Robespierre came into disagreement, and explain why he was killed

- Outline what is meant by his phrase 'the Revolution is devouring its own'

See Leading Edge document on Dropbox for support - Explain importance of Marat's paper L'ami du Peuple

- Explain the role of Marat in the execution of Louis Capet

- Outline his role in the aftermath of the Champs de Mars Massacre

- Describe his role in the September Massacres

- Explain why Marat was murder and by whom

- Make refer to the aftermath of Marat's death

(See Leading Edge document on Dropbox for support) LEARNING INTENTION: Understand the significant role played by Marat in the French Revolution - Understand why Robespierre urged a centralised government

- Explain his role in the Committee of Public Safety

- Explain Robespierre's link with the popular movement

- Explain why Robespierre developed and, for some time, maintained popularity with the people

- Explain why Robespierre fell from favour with the people of Paris and the National Convention Learning intention: Understand the significant role played by Robespierre in the French Revolution End of AOS2
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