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REAL PREZI FOR NORTH KOREAN GENOCIDE

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by

Abrar Khatri

on 13 June 2014

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Transcript of REAL PREZI FOR NORTH KOREAN GENOCIDE

8 Stages of Genocide
IN
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9
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2
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4
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c
Economic Events
Religion

Christians were prosecuted for their beliefs they would be publicly executed or forcibly transferred to concentration camps.
Kim II Sung as god, Kim Jong II (son) as the son of God
Kim Il-Sung (Background)
- Acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnic, racial, or religious group, For instance:
North Korea
Works Cited
BBC News: Asia-Pacific. BBC News, 12 Dec. 2012. Web. 6 Jan. 2013. <http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-15278612>.
Chalk, Frank, and Kurt Jonassohn. "Genocide: Origins of a Concept." The History and Sociology of Genocide. New Haven: Yale UP, 1990. 8-12. Print.
Cross. MicErnest. N.p., 15 Dec. 2012. Web. 6 Jan. 2013. <http://micernest.com/while-christianity-may-be-declining-in-britain-it-is-increasing-in-india/>.
"Kim Il-sung." Wikipedia. Wikipedia, 4 Jan. 2013. Web. 6 Jan. 2013. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kim_Il-sung>.
Korean Girl with Her Brother in Front of a Tank. 9 June 1951. Korean War Records. National Archives. National Archives. Web. 6 Jan. 2013. <http://www.archives.gov/research/military/korean-war/>.
"North Korea." Genocide Watch: The International Alliance to End Genocide. N.p., n.d. Web. 6 Jan. 2013. <http://www.genocidewatch.org/northkorea.html>.
North Korean Flag. The Gleaner. Rutgers University, 15 Apr. 2012. Web. 6 Jan. 2013. <http://gleaner.rutgers.edu/2012/04/18/in-the-news-week-of-4152012/north-korea-flag/>.
North Korean Troops. World Policy Blog. World Policy Institute, 6 Feb. 2012. Web. 6 Jan. 2013. <http://www.worldpolicy.org/blog/2012/02/06/genocide-north-korea>.
Oppression in North Korea. Research Topics. Blogger, 19 Jan. 2011. Web. 6 Jan. 2013. <http://jeresearchtopics.blogspot.com/2011/01/oppression-in-north-korea.html>.
Park, Robert. "North Korea and the Genocide Movement." Harvard International Review. Harvard University, 27 Sept. 2011. Web. 6 Jan. 2013. <http://hir.harvard.edu/north-korea-and-the-genocide-movement>.
- - -. "Time to End North Korea 'Genocide'." The Diplomat. N.p., 2 Feb. 2012. Web. 6 Jan. 2013. <http://thediplomat.com/2012/02/02/time-to-end-north-korea-genocide/>.
"Photographs: Mass-Starvations in North Korea." North Korea Now. N.p., n.d. Web. 6 Jan. 2013. <http://www.northkoreanow.org/film-photo/photographs-mass-starvations-in-north-korea/>. United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. N.p., n.d. Web. 6 Jan. 2013. <http://www.ushmm.org/>.
United to End Genocide. N.p., n.d. Web. 6 Jan. 2013. <http://www.endgenocide.net>. United to End Genocide is a great public awareness website that allows people to learn about genocide. There is a page dedicated to countries currently at risk of genocide, as well as a page dedicated to recent news about those countries, and others that are recovering from genocide. United to End Genocide also allows people to give monetary donations that will go to relief funds for people who have been affected by genocide. I used this site to learn about genocide in general and, specifically, the genocide in North Korea. I also found a video titled "Who We Are" that I was able to incorporate into my project (http://endgenocide.org/who-we-are/).
Human Rights Case Study:
North Korea(mid 1990s)

Statistics
Genocide is...
Classification
Communists and Anti-Communists
Christians were targeted
Symbolization
Extermination
peak claims lives of 2,000+ people
Executes Koreans 3.5 million lives were lost
The different types of genocide used in North Korea:
Politicide
killing people
Infanticide
killing children and babies
Denial
Dehumanization
mass starvation
public executions
forced labor and abortions
rape
inhuman torture
infanticide
Organization
North Korea becomes partners with China
China gets involved
Military Help
China helps North Korea wipe out the Anti-Communists
Polarization
Us blamed for deaths in Korean war
Kim-II Sung felt eliminating South Korea was his duty
Because of North Korea's strict policies, very little information about the genocide has made its way out of the country.
Here's what we know:
Estimated number of innocents murdered: between
710,000
and
3,500,000

Hundreds of thousands fled to China
Of these thousands,
80%
of the women were sex-trafficked or sold into forced marriages
1,600,000
Middle estimate of
1,600,000
Human Rights Abuse
Social Events
Crimes Against Humanity:

Freedom of expression does not exist
Detention, torture, executions, & enforced disappearance
State Security Department, the Ministry of People’s Security, and the Korean People’s Army Military Security Command would plan arrests and detentions
Widespread, and systematic discrimination due to social class, gender, and disability
L
I
N
K

www.libertyinnorthkorea.org
- april 15th 1912
-mangyondae, near
pyongyang, Korea
-fought beside the
Soviet Army during WWII
-freedom fighter
-changed birth name to
Kim II-Sung
- elected president
in 1972
Timelines
1945 - Conflict between North and South of Korea, after WWII

1946 - Start of North Korea's communist party

1948 - North Korea is made

1950 - South Korea declares independence

1953 - Korean war ends

1960-1990 - Genocide (carries on) in North Korea
- Discrimination against Christians
- Many fled to China
(80% of women who fled were either sex trafficked or sold into forced marriages)


1991 - Both (North & South) Korea join the United Nation

1994 - Kim II- Sung dies
- His son Kim Jong- II is the new leader
- Genocide ends but the killing continues
- Similar to the ones of the Holocaust

- Thousands of people have died in the camps

- sent due to their religious and political beliefs

- Forced to work, they were starved and beaten to death

- Hundreds died every single day

Concentration Camps/Labor Camps
Preparation
no sign of religion or attire should be revealed
North Koreans categorically labeled as 'illegal'
Anti-Communists or Christians with 3+ generations should be killed
Pregnant women were killed more than any men or women
Kim Jong II and Kim Jong denies the allegations of sending people to labor camps for “not mourning enough”
Industrialized and saw economic growth through the 1950's and 60's
Kim II sung began a series of economic reforms
North Korean famine (1995)
Soviet union collapsed (1991)
North Korean economy collapsed
No positive impact on the countries dire human rights record
200,000 North Koreans imprisoned in camps
government orders a shoot-on-sight to border guards
no independent media, religious freedom or functioning civil society
Punished if found with mobile media ex. DVDs or computers
All media, publications are state controlled
unauthorized access to non-state radio or TV broadcasts are also punished
Punished if found communicating with people outside of North Korea
Political
- Kim Sung II
- Kim Jong II
- Kim Jong Un
commission finds complete denial of the right to freedom
North Korea claim it to be a state where all citizens are equal
Little freedom of movement and defectors are harshly punished
state would control where people live and work
Quiz Time!
1. Who are the 3 communist
leaders of North Korea
2. What does DPRK mean?
3. True or False? 300000
North Koreans were
imprisoned in camps
4. What happened to the women
that fled to China?
5. North Korean famine occured
in what year?
iberty

N

orth


orea
Full transcript