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Decompression

Aircraft decompression and cabin crew responsibilities
by

katie wood

on 22 October 2012

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Transcript of Decompression

Recap
Any Q’s  In your designated groups-collect your cards with statements on them (this links to the topic next week when we will be searching for BOMBS!!!).
In your colour group, put together a presentation to show the rest of the group about your subject-use any resources available.
Please ask me for any assistance  Activity….. What is the Earth’s atmosphere?
It's a thin layer of gases surrounding our planet
The word "atmosphere" (from the Greek "atmos," or breath, and "sphaira," ball) refers to the gas that surrounds any planet or star. Earth's atmosphere, which is held in place by Earth's gravity, is made up of nitrogen, oxygen, argon, carbon dioxide, small amounts of other gases, and a little bit of water vapor—in other words, what we call "air." Our atmosphere gives us with a barrier from the sun's ultraviolet radiation and a cushion against the changing extremes of temperature day to day. Aviation Geography Combining the diagram you completed yesterday and what you have learned today, produce an explanatory leaflet for new cabin crew including the following points…
The atmosphere
Pressurisation
Decompression-rapid and slow
Actions taken by the flight crew and cabin crew

PLEASE BRING TO OUR NEXT LESSON ON WEDNESDAY, thank you  In our IT session next… Get on O2
Sit down/fasten seatbelt
Tell pax to do same
Wedge cart between seats
When safe altitude reached monkey swing to nearest portable oxygen-get one for your friend!!
Check pax, colleagues, no smoking, toilets, galleys
Report to alert station for briefing-there will be an emergency landing
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_QL08dNGCKo Decompression drill for cabin crew Aircraft fly between 29-42,000 ft (Tropopause)
Outside temp is minus 56 degrees C
Less oxygen so A/C is pressurised to the equivalent of 7000ft after take off
A/C is also heated.
Loss of oxygen is real danger. Flying at altitude http://k9keystrokes.hubpages.com/hub/The-Air-Childrens-Education-on-Earths-Surrounding-Layers-of-Air Only cure is oxygen!!!
Full recovery can be made very quickly


Can you remember who is more susceptible? Signs and symptoms-
Extremities turn blue
Confusion
Feeling ok/euphoric
Unconciousness
Death 


TIME OF USEFUL CONSCIOUSNESS!! Recap-Hypoxia State why A/C are pressurised
Define what is a rapid or slow decompression and be able to state a minimum of 4 signs of each that would occur in the cabin
Recall a minimum of 5 points from the decompression drill and explain the importance of these actions
Understand how 2 different oxygen supplies work To understand why aircraft are pressurised and what stages of flight this happens
Look at different types of decompression on board an aircraft-rapid and slow
How do cabin crew and flight crew respond to these situations
Gain an understanding of the different types of supplementary oxygen systems
Gain knowledge about time of useful consciousness Aims and objectives This lesson will contain some loud BANGS!! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7NFcSpIDcxI What is the atmosphere made of? Aviation Geography http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/usa/8423168/Plane-makes-emergency-landing-after-roof-falls-in.html Examples All A/C flying over 13,000 ft need to be pressurised and heated


This happens just after T/O, and the A/C is depressurised prior to landing Pressurisation Caused by air conditioning failure or faulty door seal
No obvious signs-may get stomach/ear ache
O2 masks will drop Caused by structural damage/terrorism
Signs-loud bang
Rush of air
Mist/temperature drops
Pain in ears/stomach
Paper/objects flying towards hole
Liquids will bubble over
O2 masks will drop
A/C will go into sharp descent Slow decompression Rapid decompression Decompression Gaseous-oxygen bottles
Can be switched off Chemically generated
Always extra above seats/galleys
2 masks in the toilets Flight deck Cabin Oxygen systems What is the Earth’s atmosphere?
It's a thin layer of gases surrounding our planet
The word "atmosphere" (from the Greek "atmos," or breath, and "sphaira," ball) refers to the gas that surrounds any planet or star. Earth's atmosphere, which is held in place by Earth's gravity, is made up of nitrogen, oxygen, argon, carbon dioxide, small amounts of other gases, and a little bit of water vapor—in other words, what we call "air." Our atmosphere gives us with a barrier from the sun's ultraviolet radiation and a cushion against the changing extremes of temperature day to day. Aviation Geography http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7NFcSpIDcxI What is the atmosphere made of? Aircraft fly between 29-42,000 ft (Tropopause)
Outside temp is minus 56 degrees C
Less oxygen so A/C is pressurised to the equivalent of 7000ft after take off
A/C is also heated.
Loss of oxygen is real danger. Flying at altitude This lesson will contain some loud BANGS!! State why A/C are pressurised
Define what is a rapid or slow decompression and be able to state a minimum of 4 signs of each that would occur in the cabin
Recall a minimum of 5 points from the decompression drill and explain the importance of these actions
Understand how 2 different oxygen supplies work To understand why aircraft are pressurised and what stages of flight this happens
Look at different types of decompression on board an aircraft-rapid and slow
How do cabin crew and flight crew respond to these situations
Gain an understanding of the different types of supplementary oxygen systems
Gain knowledge about time of useful consciousness Aims and objectives Only cure is oxygen!!!
Full recovery can be made very quickly


Can you remember who is more susceptible? Signs and symptoms-
Extremities turn blue
Confusion
Feeling ok/euphoric
Unconciousness
Death 


TIME OF USEFUL CONSCIOUSNESS!! Recap-Hypoxia All A/C flying over 13,000 ft need to be pressurised and heated


This happens just after T/O, and the A/C is depressurised prior to landing Pressurisation Gaseous-oxygen bottles
Can be switched off Chemically generated
Always extra above seats/galleys
2 masks in the toilets Flight deck Cabin Oxygen systems Caused by air conditioning failure or faulty door seal
No obvious signs-may get stomach/ear ache
O2 masks will drop Caused by structural damage/terrorism
Signs-loud bang
Rush of air
Mist/temperature drops
Pain in ears/stomach
Paper/objects flying towards hole
Liquids will bubble over
O2 masks will drop
A/C will go into sharp descent Slow decompression Rapid decompression Decompression http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/usa/8423168/Plane-makes-emergency-landing-after-roof-falls-in.html Examples 1:Get on O2
2:Sit down/fasten seatbelt
3:Tell pax to do same
4:Wedge cart between seats
5:When safe altitude reached monkey swing to nearest portable oxygen-get one for your friend!!
6:Check pax, colleagues, no smoking, toilets, galleys
7:Report to alert station for briefing-there will be an emergency landing Decompression drill for cabin crew Get on O2
Sit down/fasten seatbelt
Tell pax to do same
Wedge cart between seats
Pour liquids on the floor
When 'safe altitude' reached monkey swing to nearest portable oxygen-get one for your friend!!
Check pax, colleagues, no smoking, toilets, galleys
Report to alert station for briefing-there will be an emergency landing! Decompression drill for cabin crew
In your colour group, put together a presentation to show the rest of the group about your subject-use any resources available.
Please ask me for any assistance  Activity….. Combining the diagram you completed yesterday and what you have learned today, produce an explanatory leaflet for new cabin crew including the following points…
The atmosphere
Pressurisation
Decompression-rapid and slow
Actions taken by the flight crew and cabin crew

PLEASE BRING TO OUR NEXT LESSON ON TUESDAY, thank you :) In our IT session next… Recap
Any Q’s ?
Full transcript