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Adele Varens and Jane Eyre, Contrast and Comparison

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Adriana D'Arpino

on 4 April 2016

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Transcript of Adele Varens and Jane Eyre, Contrast and Comparison

"...
If [Jane] were a nice, pretty child, one might compassionate her forlorness; but one really cannot care for such a little toad at that
" (Bronte 25).
Appearances
Childhood
Mrs. Reed feels obliged to care for Jane in respect to her late husband, Mr. Reed:
".
..in [Mr. Reed's] last moments he had required a promise of Mrs. Reed that she would rear and maintain me as one of her own children
" (Bronte 15).
Childhood
"
I have little experience with [presents]..
." (Bronte 123).
Personality
Young Jane Eyre is reserved and perfers to keep to herself, her aunt Mrs. Reed contributes to these traits by excluding her from the family and treating Jane as second class from her other children.
Adriana D'Arpino
Adele Varens and Jane Eyre, Contrast and Comparison
"...pale, small-featured face, and a redundancy of hair falling in curls to [Adele's] waist" (Bronte 102).
Mr. Rochester feels obligated to take care of Adele after her mother dies.
"
Miss Eyre you are not so unsophisticated as Adele: she demands a 'cadeau', clamorously, the moment she sees me...
" (Bronte 123).
Childhood
Much like Jane's attendance at Lowood, Rochester sends Adele to a arduous boarding school:
"
[Adele] looked pale and thin, she said she was not happy. I found the rules of the establishment were too strict, its course of study too severe, for a child of her age...
" (Bronte 458).
Adele's school life improves thanks to the intervention of Jane:
"
During these eight years my life was uniform: but not unhappy...I had the means of an excellent education placed within my reach; a fondness for some of my studies...with a great delight in pleasing my teachers, especially such as I loved, urged me on...In time I rose to be the first girl of the first class
" (Bronte 85).
"
...when she left school, I found her a pleasing and obliging companion: docile, good-temperered, and well-principled
" (Bronte 458).
Childhood
The most obvious differences between Adele and Jane are their social classes. Adele is rich, Jane is poor. However both appear to have the same view on poverty:
"
...[Children] have not much idea of industrious, working, respectable poverty; they think of the word only as connected with ragged clothes, scanty food, fireless grates, rude manners, and debasing vices: poverty for me was synonymous with the degradation
" (Bronte 24).
"
I think [Madame Frederic] is poor, for she had not so fine a house as mama
" (Bronte 104-105).
On the other hand, Adele loves to show off, encouraged by her mother and Mr. Rochester every time he gives her a gift:
"
Mama used to teach me how to dance and sing, and to say verses. A great many gentlemen and ladies came to see mama and I used to dance before them, or to sit on their knees and sing to them: I liked it. Shall I let you hear me sing now?
" (Bronte 104).
Personality
"
I am glad you are no relation of mine: I will never call you aunt again as long as I live. I will never come to see you when I am grown up; and if any one asks me how I liked you, and how you treated me, I will say the very thought of you makes me sick, and that you treated me with miserable cruelty
" (Bronte 36).
Adele is much more forgiving of Mr. Rochester.
Works Cited
Bronte, Charlotte. Jane Eyre. New York: Penguin Group, 2008. Print.
Jane Eyre. Dir. Cary Fukunaga. Perf. Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender. Universal, 2011. DVD.
Full transcript