Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Soil's Soul

No description
by

TJ Shaffer

on 19 February 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Soil's Soul

Soil's Soul
soil's nutrition
soil is alive!
soil structure
do
work!
sand particles
clay particles
silt particles
loam
if you were a root...
Tilth is the general ability of soil to support root growth.
Soil with good tilth has the ability to hold large amounts of water and has many spaces for roots to grow through.
Naturally there are a few ways to add tilth to soil:
By presenting a friendly environment for worms and other organisms we can ensure they will live in our environment and contribute to the soil health.
what helps our plants
grow?
nutrients
and are
absorbed
through the roots
H O
2
N
macro
nutrients
micro
nutrients
N
N
N
N
P
P
P
P
P
K
K
K
K
K
Ca
S
Mg
Ca
Ca
Ca
Ca
S
S
S
S
S
Mg
Mg
Mg
how can
elements
stay in soil?
N
itrogen
P
hosphorous
(K)
Potassium
nitrogen is a
gas
nitrogen helps with plant tissue and keeps it green
phosphorus
becomes available from minerals and decomposing organic matter
it helps with root & shoot growth
potassium helps with flowering and fruiting
bacteria!!
bacteria exist mostly in the
rhizosphere
,
where roots are
they make nutrients
available
to plants
bacteria
captures

N
itrogen from the atmosphere, and makes it available to plants
microorganisms
fungi
fungi initiate the
decomposition
process
many plants develop a
symbiotic relationship
with fungi -- they
share
nutrients
earthworms
worms are important for
fertility
and
aeration
of the soil
worms eat
decomposing
material
worm casting
(worm poop) is highly nutritious for plants
bacteria
that live in the worm's
digestive system
break down organic matter
organisms in soil are
respiring
an entire field can be viewed as
"breathing"
soil has three textures:
O
humus or organic matter
made up of decomposing material
A
E
B
C
R
topsoil
mostly minerals
roots reach this horizon
eluviated horizon
clay, minerals, organic matter
subsoil
minerals that leached from above layers
parent material
deposit at Earth's surface from which the soil developed
bedrock
soil profile
soil's tilth
good tilth allows soil to exchange gases with the atmosphere
next time that you're in China, Brazil or Canada, grab a sample of the soil!
pH
plays a role in soil nutrients!
Andre Voisin
Almost a half-century ago, André Voisin had already grasped the importance of elements of the soil and their effects on plants, and ultimately, animal and human life. He saw the hidden danger in the gross oversimplification of fertilization practices that use harsh chemicals and ignore the delicate balance of trace minerals and nutrients in the soil. In this volume Voisin issues a call to stand up and acknowledge our responsibilities for public health and protective medicine ż part of a concerted attempt to remove the causes of ill health, disease and, in particular, cancer.
$500 -$1,200 on Amazon
One prominent academic study compared nutrient levels in 43 garden crops in 1999 with levels documented in benchmark nutrient studies conducted by USDA in 1950. The scientists found declines in median concentrations of six important nutrients: protein –6%, calcium –16%, phosphorus –9%, iron –15%, riboflavin –38%, and vitamin C –2%.[ii] Another study published in the Journal of Applied Nutrition in 1993 showed nutritional deficiencies for conventional foods relative to organic foods.[iii] Organically grown apples, potatoes, pears, wheat, and sweet corn, purchased over a two-year period, averaged 63% higher in calcium, 73% higher in iron, 118% higher in magnesium, 91% higher in phosphorus, 125% higher in potassium, and 60% higher in zinc than conventional foods purchased at the same time.
Full transcript