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The Grimke Sisters

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by

Angelina and Sarah Grimke

on 18 March 2013

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Transcript of The Grimke Sisters

The Brothers Grimm by Katie and Faith Sisters Grimke Who were the sisters? The Grimke sisters, Angelina and Sarah, were two white southern women who came from a slaveholding family in South Carolina. They had the courage to move to Philadelphia because they did not agree with their parent's practice of slavery. What did Angelina and Sarah do? Angelina wrote a pamphlet that encouraged the southern women to convince the southern men of the wrongs of slavery. Angelina was also the first woman to speak before an American legislature. In 1838, Sarah published a pamphlet arguing for equal rights for women called "Letters on the Equality of the Genders and the Condition of Women". Angelina and Sarah were the first women to speak before male and female audiences of the Anti-Slavery Society!!! In 1839, the sisters wrote "American Slavery As It Is", which was one of the most important abolitionist writings of the time. All in all, the Grimke sisters were very important to women's rights and to convincing people how terrible slavery was! Vote for Angelina and Sarah Grimke, "the Grimke sisters": the most important reformers! Sarah Grimke also argued for women's rights, calling for equal pay for equal work and pointing out laws that negatively affected women. Not only did they move, but they also became well-known antislavery activists! Hey! I'm Sarah! Yo! The name's Angelina!
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