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Literary Terms

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by

Caroline Headley

on 10 September 2015

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Transcript of Literary Terms

Literary Terms
Day 3
Day 4
Day 2
Day 1
Why are they important?
Authors use literary devices to enhance readers' understanding and add a dramatic effect to their words.
Static Character
Dynamic Character
Flat Character
Round Character
Foil
Protagonist
Antagonist
Omniscient Point of View
First Person Point of View
Third-person-limited Point of View
Situational Irony
Verbal Irony
Dramatic Irony
Soliloquy
Monologue
Day 5
Mood
Tone
Connotation
Dialect
Imagery
Day 6
A character who does not change much in the course of the story.
A character who changes as a result of the story
A character who only has a few character traits and can be described in a few words
A character who is like a real person and has many different character traits
Character who is used as a contrast to another character; characters who are the opposite of one another
Main character in a work of fiction or drama
The character or force that blocks the protagonist
Alliteration
Onomatopoeia
Personification
Simile
Figure of speech that makes a comparison between two unlike things using a word such as like, as, resembles, or than.
"Ogres are like onions"
Metaphor
Repetition of the same or very similar consonant sounds usually at the beginning of words that are close together
Use of a word whose sounds imitates or suggests its meaning
"Boom" and "Pow"
Occurs when there is a contrast between what would seem appropriate and what really happens or when there is a contradiction between what we expect to happen and what really does take place.
When a writer/speaker says one thing but really means something completely different
Occurs when the audience, reader, or another character knows something important that a character in a play or story doesn't know.
Long speech in which a character alone on stage expresses his or her thoughts aloud
A long speech by one character to one or more other characters on stage
Kind of metaphor in which a non-human thing or quality is talked about as if it were human
Symbol
Myth
Hyperbole
Foreshadowing
Allusion
The point of view where the person telling the story knows everything there is to know about the characters and their thoughts
“Hansel walked ahead of Gretel; after all, he knew he belonged in the front because Gretel was just a girl. Gretel dropped breadcrumbs behind her as she went, knowing that her bumbling brother couldn’t be counted on to find his way home from the outhouse, let alone from the middle of the woods.

Ahead of them, an old witch waited, her stomach rumbling at the thought of what a delicious dinner the two plump children would make.”
The point of view where one character is telling the story using "I"
The point of view where the narrator, who plays no part in the story, zooms in on the thoughts and feelings of just one character
“Hansel walked ahead of Gretel. Gretel dropped breadcrumbs behind her as she went, knowing that her bumbling brother couldn’t be counted on to find his way home from the outhouse, let alone from the middle of the woods.”
“Hansel walked ahead of me. I made sure I dropped breadcrumbs behind me as I went, since my bumbling brother couldn’t be counted on to find his way home from the outhouse, let alone from the middle of the woods.”
Figure of speech that makes a comparison between two unlike things without the use of like or as.
"Take the bull by the horns"
"How could she marry a snake like that?"

"You are my sunshine"

Person, place, thing, or event that stands for itself and for something beyond itself as well
Traditional story from a culture, is basically religious, and usually serves to explain a belief, a ritual, or a mystery
Figure of speech that uses exaggeration to express strong emotion or to create a comic effect
The use of clues to hint at events that will occur later in a plot
Reference to a something well-known and understood by many
A story’s atmosphere or feeling
Attitude a writer takes toward a subject, a character, or the audience
All the meanings, associations, or emotions that have come to be attached to some words
Way of speaking that is characteristic of a particular region or particular group of people
Language that appeals to the senses
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