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Elizabethan Beliefs

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Eaman Nasar

on 15 October 2012

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Transcript of Elizabethan Beliefs

Elizabethan Beliefs Great Chain
of Being Order of Great Things Crime and Punishment Elizabethan Beliefs Superstitions Depiction of a man being hung,
drawn, and quartered. Theft could land you in the pillory The law during the Elizabethan Era was extremely harsh. What is considered an inhumane sentence today, was performed often back then. Crimes and punishments were different depending on the convict's class... By Wajiha Lower Class There were two classes: (Everyday commoners, were generally poor) Common crimes were often misdemeanors, and examples include: Theft
Fraud
Begging
Being drunk in public
Cheating a customer
Gossiping/Being Over-Talkative Upper Class (The wealthy and noble) When crimes were committed, they were usually felonies. Examples include: Murder
Rebellion
Treason
Witchcraft
Blasphemy Punishments: Punishments for the lower class include: Wearing The Drunkards Cloak- A heavy, large barrel that must be worn as a shirt Getting the stocks/pillory- A wooden frame with holes for the head, legs, or hands to be locked in. The Brank- A headpiece designed to injure the wearer's tongue if they spoke Hanging Whipping Burning Punishments: Punishments for the upper class include: Beheading: Getting the head decapitated, usually by an axe Burning to death: (Usually for those accused of witchcraft) "Everything in the universe has a specific place and rank in order of their precieved importance and "spiritual" nature" Many of Shakespeare's plays revolve around this belief. For example Romeo and Juliet
Hamlet
Macbeth Divine Right
of Kings "The concept that the right to rule derives from God and that Kings are answerable for their actions to God alone." By: Sameen Shahzad Structure of the society Sanguine The Four Humours Choleric Astrology in Elizabethan Lives Eaman Eaman Eaman Being hung, drawn, and quartered (For those guilty of high treason):
Being hanged until the person is almost dead
Then being dragged across the street tied to a horse's tail
Finally, having the body cut in four pieces. •Astrology was looked highly upon, and it was believed astrologers could predict the future, an individuals personality through different planets, and important days were predicted through horoscopes by an astrologers
•The day of Queen Elizabeth’s coronation was chosen through horoscope by John Dee
•Elizabethans thought of Astrology as somewhat mystical and very interesting
•If one was a astrologer they could become famous and rich
In Shakespeare's works, some characters were ruled by planets, such as Posthumous from Shakespeare's play Cymbeline, Posthumous was influenced by Jupiter Beliefs and Common Superstitions •Many superstitions based on traditions and beliefs from older ages
•Origin of superstitions are based on magic or chance
•When you sneeze the devil could enter your body
•An eclipse was an omen of evil agreeable lustful •People blame unexplainable events to the work of witches
•Witches were mostly women, poor, old, or ones who were single with no man
•Witches were able to fly, typically portrayed as a hag, living alone, had animals in their houses (such as cats, crows, frogs, bat, mice) and brewed magic potions over a cauldron JAIL By Teimur Works Cited Prone to anger During the Elizabethan Era, jail was not a considered a punishment, but simply a waiting area for a criminal until they received their trial. Shakespeare is critical of the King’s beliefs and reveals his opinions in very subtle ways in the play while seeking to remain in the king’s good favor The Element melancholy Plegmatic Courageous Air Characteristics that represented the sanguine humour The Element Fire Cheerful Season Spring Pride rasheness Season Summer The Element is earth irritable sleepless morose introspective The characteristics that represent someone who is melancholic are... The Element is water Season Winter The Characteristics that represent someone who is plegematic are dull pale in complection cowardly Season Autumn Shakespeare refers to the four humours in his poetry For example: Lady Mcbeth says: " Yet who would have thought little old man to have so much blood in him"
(v.144-45) This reference to blood implies Duncan's saguine personality of being kind and joyful Blood Yellow bile Black Bile Phlegmatic Black Death (Bubonic Plague) This plague killed nearly one third of the population Though there were many different diseases this was the most deadly and The Diese was spread by fleas that lived in the fur on animals like rodents and cows. Which meant that farmers were more like The disease was spread by fleas that lived in the fur on animals like rodents and cows. Which meant that farmers were more likely to catch the plague The Elizabethan era doctors This is what the doctors of the Elizabethan Era looked like. Just like doctors today who wear a mask to protect themselves and the patients from bacteria The doctors didn't look scary for no reason, the mask was made to prevent the doctors from catching the plague from the sick patients. If one of these fluids became imbalanced, having more or less fluid than the other three, the person was believed to be ill. To relieve an earache, doctors would put roasted onions in the patient’s ear. A fever is a common sickness we know today, that was believed to be created by an unbalanced humour. To cure these patients, doctors would reduce the amount of blood or bile in the body. For a stye, a person was told to rub the eye with a tail of a cat. For a mental patient transfusing of the blood with blood of a lamb was supposed to be healing. Prison conditions were
quite bad, and mice
and other rodents would often be
present in the cell. Honour and Dueling If there was a disagreement between two men, and one "challenged" or "questioned" the other's honour, the two men could
agree to duel. Dueling was not legal, meaning
these men had to do it somewhere
discreet or maybe even leave
the country. Different weapons could be used for dueling, such as axes, daggers or swords. The rapier is skinny sword designed for dueling, however it was mostly used in fencing for practicing self defense.
Beyer, Ashely, and Valerie Passerini. "Crime and Punishment." Templateeliz. Web. 11 Oct. 2012. <http://www2.springfield.k12.il.us/schools/springfield/eliz/crimeandpunishment.html>.
"CRIME AND PUNISHMENT." Tomecek.com. Web. 11 Oct. 2012.
"Dueling and Weapons." Dueling and Weapons. Web. 11 Oct. 2012. <http://www.palmbeach.k12.fl.us/johnileonardhs/courses/english/web_project/weapons.html>.
"Elizabethan Crime and Punishment." Elizabethan Crime and Punishment. Web. 11 Oct. 2012. <http://www.elizabethan-era.org.uk/elizabethan-crime-and-punishment.htm>.
"Elizabethan Executions." Elizabethan Executions. Web. 11 Oct. 2012. <http://www.elizabethan-era.org.uk/elizabethan-executions.htm>.
"Elizabethan Fencing." Elizabethan Fencing. Web. 11 Oct. 2012. <http://www.elizabethan-era.org.uk/elizabethan-fencing.htm>.
"Honor and Dueling." Life in Elizabethan England 26:. Web. 11 Oct. 2012. <http://www.elizabethan.org/compendium/26.html>.
"Table of Contents." The Arte of Defense. Web. 11 Oct. 2012. <http://jan.ucc.nau.edu/~wew/rapier.htm>.
http://english.learnub.com/lesson/4423-about-the-elizabethean-era-and-the-four-humours
http://www.elizabethan-era.org.uk/elizabethan-medicine-and-illnesses.htm
http:/www.2springfield.k.il.us/schools/springfield/eliz/elizabethanmedicine.htm/
Wajiha Wajiha Spotlight on
Mr. Shakespeare and Elizabethan era The End The structure was hierarchical and arranged like a pyramid, with the numberless mass of the peasantry and laboring class at the bottom, and the Queen at the top. monarch
nobility
gentry
merchants
laborers Monarch Nobility Gentry Merchants Yeomanry Eaman Eaman Eaman Eaman Eaman Eaman Eaman Eaman Fairies • Along with witches Elizabethans believed in fairies
• Fairies were to look like a common human, generally short in height
• Elizabethans thought fairies were beautiful and usually of a dark complexion
• In Midsummer Nights Dream a play by Shakespeare, fairies were adapted to have wings, and have association with nature Works Cited "Background Info on Elizabethan Belief in Fairies." Background Info on Elizabethan Belief in Fairies. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Oct. 2012. <http://shs.westport.k12.ct.us/radler/Shakespeare/background_info_on_elizabethan_b.htm>.

"Elizabethan Superstitions." Elizabethan Superstitions. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Oct. 2012. <http://www.elizabethan-era.org.uk/elizabethan-superstitions.htm>.

"Shakespeare's Astrology." Shakespeare's Astrology. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Oct. 2012. <http://starcats.com/anima/shakespeare.html>.

"Astrology in the Works of William Shakespeare." Astrology in the Works of William Shakespeare. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Oct. 2012. <http://www.astrodynamics.net/Articles/Miscellaneous/Shakespeare.htm>. Spartacus. "Right of Kings." Templateeliz. Web. 11 Oct. 2012. <http://www2.springfield.k12.il.us/schools/springfield/eliz/crimeandpunishment.html>.
"Right of Kings." Tomecek.com. Web. 11 Oct. 2012.
"Order of things-Cosmic Origins." Web. 11 Oct. 2012. <http://www.palmbeach.k12.fl.us/johnileonardhs/courses/english/web_project/weapons.html>.
"How it all worked." Elizabethan Archeology of Human Sciences. Web. 11 Oct. 2012. <http://www.elizabethan-era.org.uk/elizabethan-Socirty-people>.
"Elizabethan era" Elizabethan Michel Foucault. Web. 11 Oct. 2012. <http://www.elizabethan-era.org.uk/elizabethan-society-yeomanry.htm>.
"Elizabethan Fencing." Elizabethan Fencing. Web. 11 Oct. 2012. <http://www.elizabethan-era.org.uk/elizabethan-fencing.htm>.
"Order of Great Things." Life in Elizabethan England 26:. Web. 11 Oct. 2012. <http://www.elizabethan.org/compendium/26.html>.
"Table of Contents." The Chain of Being . Web. 11 Oct. 2012. <http://jan.ucc.nau.edu/~wew/rapier.htm>.
http://english.learnub.com/lesson/4423-about-the-elizabethean-era-and-the-four-humours
http://www.elizabethan-era.org.uk/elizabethan-medicine-and-illnesses.htm
http:/www.2springfield.k.il.us/schools/springfield/eliz/elizabethanmedicine.htm/ Work Cited
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