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Low HDI country

Devin Rafferty

on 21 April 2010

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Transcript of Mali

MALI Government Economy President: Amadou Toumani Touré Mali is one of the poorest countries in the world. The average worker's annual salary is approximately US$1,500 Mali's key industry is agriculture. Cotton is the country's largest crop export and is exported west throughout Senegal and the Ivory Coast. During 2002, 620,000 tons of cotton were produced in Mali but cotton prices declined significantly in 2003. Seasonal variations lead to regular temporary unemployment of agricultural workers. Mali is a constitutional democracy governed by the constitution of January 12, 1992, which was amended in 1999. The constitution provides for a separation of powers among the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government. The system of government can be described as "semi-presidential." Demographics Mali has one of the world's highest rates of infant mortality, with 106 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2007. The birth rate in 2007 was 49.6 births per 1,000, and the total fertility rate was 7.4 children per woman. The death rate in 2007 was 16.5 deaths per 1,000. Life expectancy at birth was 49.5 years total (47.6 for males and 51.5 for females). Health and Education Mali's health and development indicators rank among the worst in the world In 2000, only 62–65 percent of the population was estimated to have access to safe drinking water and only 69 percent to sanitation services of some kind. Medical facilities in Mali are very limited, and medicines are in short supply. Malaria and other arthropod-borne diseases are prevalent in Mali, as are a number of infectious diseases such as cholera and tuberculosis. Mali’s population also suffers from a high rate of child malnutrition and a low rate of immunization. Public education in Mali is in principle provided free of charge and is compulsory for nine years between the ages of seven and 16 However, Mali’s actual primary school enrollment rate is low,
in large part because families are unable to cover the cost
of uniforms, books, supplies, and other fees required to attend
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