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HAY INFUSION

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by

Kristine Alanna

on 3 October 2013

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Transcript of HAY INFUSION

Introduction
What is a
community
? What is a
hay

infusion
?

Objectives
To identify the
roles of the organisms
observed in a hay infusion
Primary Materials
Around 2 cups full of fresh and dry hay
Procedures
First, we laid out all the materials and placed 2 cups full of dry hay in the beaker filled with 200 ml tap water.
Succession in a Community
HAY INFUSION

October
To determine how
biotic and abiotic factors
provide for the needs of organisms
To describe
populations of microorganisms
in a micro-ecosystem's ecological succession
To
apply concepts
in the ecolo-gical succession of a micro-ecosystem to a larger one
Microscope
Hot Plates
Glass Slides and Cover Slips
Beaker
What is
ecological

succession
? What is its
importance
?

Ecological Succession
Then we heated the beaker until it boiled, stirred and let it simmer for 10 minutes then left it to cool.
We cut the green hay into 2-3mm long pieces, filled about 1/3 of the bottle and poured the 200ml dried hay infusion.
After that, we let Mang Eugene put 2mL creek water and covered the bottle with cheesecloth.
Bottles
We labeled the bottle and observed our hay infusion for 2 weeks (2x/week).
We used the microscope to observe and we shook the bottle after we observed.
Questions
Conclusion
What
changes
did you notice each day in the hay infusion project?
Why did we
boil
the water first and why did we
add
creek water?
Results
Week 2
Week 1
Questions
1.) During the
1st

week
, why were the microorganisms
dead
?
2.) Why did microorganisms start to
grow
when creek water was
added
?
3.) Why did the organisms
die
during the
final

days
of the experiment?
4.) Did other
conditions
(abiotic factors)
aid
in helping the microorganisms grow?
Points to Ponder:

A hay infusion is a great way to produce a variety of microbes during any time of the year.

The sugars in the dried grass provide food for the bacteria and other microbes.

During the first week of the hay infusion, a scum may form on the top of the water.
In weeks four and five, flagellates, ciliates, and diatoms should be present in the hay infusion.
The hay infusion should produce amoebas and more flagellates in weeks nine and ten.
The flagellates will be on the top of the water and the amoebas will probably be on the bottom of the hay infusion.
Bacteria may produce a somewhat unpleasant smell in the hay infusion that you will have to endure.
Which water sample
produced
the most microbes?
Which lens magnification made the microbes appear to be the
clearest
?
10x objective
40x objective
Ecological succession is the changing sequence of communities that live in an ecosystem during a given time period. The sugar in the hay serves as food for bacteria and when bacteria start to appear, they serve as food for protozoa. If the bacteria grow quickly so the protozoa will also grow quickly.
Abiotic factors and biotic factors interact with each other. For instance, in this experiment, abiotic factors such as the creek water (pH and temp), and the light provide the needs and help biotic factors like protozoa and bacteria survive. The biotic factors could also rely on each other as well.
In our hay infusion, microorganisms like cocci, bacilli, nematodes, and amoeba were present. Only few nematodes and protozoa appeared while there was a moderate amount of bacteria.
Ecological succession is important because it helps us determine which species are thriving and which ones are dying like the bacteria were dying while the protozoa were thriving. It's just like in the real world. The community begins with a relatively few pioneering plants and animals and develops through increasing complexity until it becomes stable as a climax community.
many
bacteria
few
protozoa
few
nematodes
no
rotifers
moderate
bacteria
no
protozoa
no
nematodes
no
rotifers
*SMELL: is bad and grows worse each day
*SMELL: is the worst
Ecological succession is the observed process of change in the species structure of an ecological community over time.
Full transcript